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1answer
74 views

How can enzyme/substrate reactions that adhere (largely) to quantum theory also require 'Newtonian' consideration of gravity?

I'd just like to ask for a little clarification here due to confusion from interdisciplinary studies. I'm currently reading the 1976 paper related to the recent 2013 Nobel Prize for Chemistry, by 2 ...
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2answers
836 views

Water doesn't flow above the rim, one reason is surface tension. Is another reason viscosity?

According to Surface tension, water molecule don't get the force from outside and get little bit outward. Is one reason viscosity? Let's look at the water in a fully filled glass. No part is outside ...
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3answers
122 views

Behavior of gasses, ideal and otherwise

I'm trying to help a child research a science project on refrigeration. Refreshing my incredibly rusty thermodynamics skills.... The ideal gas law: $PV=nRT$. Let's take air at STP: $P = 101\,kPa$ $V ...
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1answer
391 views

Negligible Mass String

I've recently been working through a lot of physics problems and a lot of them say to assume that the mass of the string used in a problem involving a pulley, for example, is negligible. Why is this ...
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1answer
228 views

Stress-energy tensor. Why this general form?

How is the stress energy tensor obtained? In most textbooks, it's simply stated as $$T^\mu{}_\nu=(\rho+P)U^\mu U_\nu-P\delta^\mu{}_\nu$$ I can see why this makes sense for a comoving observer at ...
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2answers
654 views

Force acting on an object?

You have a bar of metal in an environment with no gravity. A force is applied on one end of it. How does it rotate? There is a non-zero torque on any random point selected on the bar. For example, ...
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3answers
2k views

Why gravity decreases as we go under ground? [duplicate]

We all know that gravity decreases as we go upward, we also know that gravity decreases as we go inside the earth? I don't know why gravity decreases as we go downward or inside the Earth? Please ...
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2answers
1k views

relationship between kinematics and area under curve

My teacher is giving us an honors pre-calc/calculus introduction to physics and the kinematics learning target he has given us is to understand the "relationship between area under a curve and the ...
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1answer
78 views

Gradient of the potential originated from two similar magnetic vector potentials is not the same

The magnetic vector potential $\textbf{A}$ can be defined up to a gradient of a field. Adding or subtracting such gradient should not change the physics of the problem. The same reasoning is applied ...
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4answers
2k views

“Weight” of moving object in a car collision

From time to time I see safety warning about keeping loose items in your car. The last warning used a 2kg object, and claimed that if a collision occurred at $50{km\over h}$ it would have a weight ...
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1answer
2k views

How does concave bowl amplifies the sound?

I recently came across an article / answer in Quora see here that mentioned that if we place the iPhone in a bowl and play music, the volume is amplified. What is the physics principle behind this?
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1answer
469 views

What makes the quarks stay inside the proton?

Inside a single proton for example, what is the force(s) that keeps the quarks together? Why don't they leave the proton? If they do, how does that even happen? And maybe an additional sub question: ...
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1answer
720 views

Conservation of mass-energy and nuclear transmutation

This may just be beyond the grasp of the everyman, but I'm trying, and failing, to grasp how conservation of mass-energy works in cases of beta decay and electron capture. A neutron has a mass of one ...
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1answer
314 views

Maxwell's equations as the particular case of massive vector field equation

There was a discussion (please look to the comments on my answer) about getting Maxwell's equations for free spin-1 field by using massive spin-1 representation's equations. I'll start from the ...
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1answer
193 views

How does Hawking radiation grow as a black hole evaporates?

The temperature of Hawking radiation is inversely proportional to the mass of a black hole, $T_{\rm H}\propto M_{\rm BH}^{-1}$, and so as the black hole shrinks the temperature of the radiation should ...
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2answers
835 views

Does the heat produced in an inductor affected by the total current in the resistance in the circuit?

The energy stored in an inductor depends on the inductance of the inductor and the current flowing through it. But, assume that the switch is opened. Then, does the heat generated in the inductor ...
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3answers
863 views

Relationship between Stoke's law of sound attenuation and the inverse square law

In attempting to find a reference for explaining sound propagation, I came across this article in Wikipedia: Stokes law(sound attenuation) What I learnt in high school is that sound is propagated by ...
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1answer
51 views

Is there a heuristic argument for the expression $ \textbf{g} = \frac {\mathbf{S}}{c^2}$?

Electromagnetic momentum density and the Poynting vector are related by the simple expression: $$ \textbf{g} = \frac {\mathbf{S}}{c^2}$$ It can be rigorously derived from Maxwell's equations, but is ...
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3answers
180 views

Can the vacuum be filled with virtual micro-black holes?

Since the vacuum is thought to be virtual particles, is it possible that there might be virtual micro-black holes with virtual horizons and virtual hawking radiation which form and evaporate at a rate ...
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1answer
207 views

Paper in physics - calculations; rounding or not?

I'm currently a high schooler, and I'm writing my first scientific paper. The result is fairly simple, and it is nothing too special, but I see it as a nice way to prepare myself for the academic ...
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2answers
1k views

$\gamma$ in Newton's Second Law of Motion in Differential Form

I am teaching myself Differential Equations from a website. In the website I am up to Direction Fields and an example of a differential equation is Newton's Second Law of Motion. It is written on the ...
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2answers
344 views

Light in fibre optic cables

Imagine a fibre optic cable stretching from London to New York (5571 km) carrying a data signal This data signal is split into two parts, red and blue light Both signals start travelling down the ...
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2answers
249 views

Stern-Gerlach and Hund's second rule

According to Hund's second rule, the spin tends to be maximal. That would, in my understanding, imply that, regarding the Stern-Gerlach experiment, the important electron in a silver atom has spin 1/...
1
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1answer
134 views

Depletion region

In a semiconductor diode. There is a depletion region formed, it is formed when electrons from n type side migrate to p type side, now which electrons transfer? Valence band ones present at the ...
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3answers
789 views

Determine resultant velocity of an elastic particle-particle collision in 3d space

So I have two particles that have collided in 3 dimensional space. I want the particles to rebound off of each other in an elastic manner. How do I determine the resultant velocity vector if I know: ...
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1answer
1k views

Why the electric force does no work on the charge when perpendicular to the field?

I was reading my physics textbook and came across this sentence: When a charge moves in an electric field, unless its displacement is always perpendicular to the field, the electric force does ...
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3answers
5k views

Average Energy of the Quantum Harmonic Oscillator

In Griffiths, the average potential energy for the quantum harmonic oscillator is given as $$\langle V\rangle~=~\frac{1}{2}\hbar \omega(n+\frac{1}{2}).$$ Is the potential energy of the quantum ...
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1answer
209 views

Chemistry from a physical perspective [duplicate]

I'm currently learning chemistry for the first time, and loving it. I have a reasonably good physics and maths background and it's great to see things like spherical harmonics in quantum mechanics "...
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1answer
409 views

Wavefunction's inner product

When two wavefunctions are orthogonal we can write that $$\langle\Psi_n|\Psi_m\rangle=\delta_{mn}$$ This means that $$\langle\Psi_1|\Psi_2\rangle=\langle\Psi_2|\Psi_1\rangle=0$$ But if the two ...
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1answer
213 views

Motion in insulating fluid under high voltage

I observed the following phenomenon in an experiment (I'm not a student of physics, just an amateur) and was hoping for an explanation. A metal pan is electrically grounded and a layer of ...
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2answers
299 views

Frames of reference: Inertial and accelerated - and jerked, snapped, crackled and popped?

There are inertial frames of reference and the accelerated frames of reference, but are there any frames of references w.r.t. higher order derivatives of velocity? [1] [2] For example, jerked frames ...
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2answers
708 views

Wave function decomposition

Problem: Given the wave function $\Psi_0=A\sin^2(\theta)$ along with the Hamiltonian operator of a physical system: $H=\frac{L^2}{2I}+g B L_z$, find the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of $\hat{H}$ ...
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1answer
151 views

determining orbit parameters (eccentricity, length and angle of major axis)

I'm trying to make an orbit simulator, and I want to draw the orbit of a satellite given its position and velocity vectors in a 2-D plane. I found this other question which tells how to calculate ...
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1answer
450 views

Why is kinetic energy only “often $(1/2)mv^2$”?

I am reading the first few pages of Nakahara and refreshing my memory on physics I learned a while ago as a physics math undergrad. Nakahara defines a field $F$ to be conservative if it's the gradient ...
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2answers
2k views

What is the highest useful magnification todays largest telescopes can offer?

I know that the maximum (useful) magnification is limited by the diffraction limit, but I was not able to find numbers for the highest useful magnification factors using modern large telescopes. How ...
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1answer
303 views

How would a very nearby supernova shockwave and remnants affect the earth?

I've been reading about supernovae for a while, and I noticed how incredibly fast their shockwave and remnants travel shortly after the explosion. So I thought about how this would affect the earth if ...
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1answer
2k views

Energy and probability for the particle in a box

The question statement: we have a particle of mass m in a box of length a. The wavefunction is given as $$\psi(x)=x\sin \left(\frac{\pi x}{a}\right)$$ It asks to normalize the wave function and find ...
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2answers
470 views

Complex Versus Real Wave Velocities in Quantum Mechanics

There's a fantastic quote in Schrodinger's second 1926 paper1 that apparently provides some motivation for the discrete energy levels (I think) that I'm having trouble interpreting: I would not ...
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2answers
813 views

Deriving the Lorentz force from velocity dependent potential

We can achieve a simplified version of the Lorentz force by $$F=q\bigg[-\nabla(\phi-\mathbf{A}\cdot\mathbf{v})-\frac{d\mathbf{A}}{dt}\bigg],$$ where $\mathbf{A}$ is the magnetic vector potential and ...
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1answer
202 views

Extremizing a Hamilton-Jacobi Equation

How can one make sense of the idea of extremizing a Hamilton-Jacobi equation? In Schrödinger's paper "Quantisation as a Problem of Proper Values I" (Annalen der Physik (4), vol. 79, 1926, p. 1, ...
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2answers
420 views

Energy transfer using quantum entanglement

Can we transfer energy from one place to another separated by arbitrarily large distances without any time lag? For instance, if Alice and Bob are two observers making measurements having a singlet ...
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3answers
13k views

What is the Units for Thermal conductivity?

What are the units for thermal conductivity and why?
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1answer
134 views

S. Weinberg, “The Quantum theory of fields: Foundations” (1995), Eq. 2.4.8

Unfortunately I'm struggling to understand how do we get eq. (2.4.8) from eq. (2.4.7), p. 60; namely how $(\Lambda \omega \Lambda^{-1} a)_\mu P^\mu$ is transformed into $\Lambda_\mu^{\;\rho}\Lambda_\...
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1answer
75 views

Glass properties

This is a question about the properties and strength of glass. I know that glass is an amorphous solid but I am not sure if that is relevant to my question. My question is that if there's no physical ...
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1answer
711 views

Calculating expectation value

I am trying to calculate the expectation value of an infinite quantum well in one dimension (L). Given: $$\phi_n = \sqrt{\frac{2}{L}}\sin\left(\frac{n\pi}{L}x\right)$$ and $$E_n=\left[\frac{\hbar^2\...
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2answers
420 views

Calculate the polarization vector on reflection or refraction from a dielectric interface

I am interested in ray-tracing polarized photons. I have code that works very well for unpolarized light. When a ray hits a dielectric interface the photon is either reflected or refracted by ...
1
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1answer
1k views

Resonance Experiment

Today in high school physics class, we performed an experiment on the resonance of sound, with a set up like this... To put it simply, the sound waves are supposed to rebound with the surface of ...
1
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1answer
523 views

Local gauge invariance and fields

I have one question about local gauge invariance of the spinor and scalar theories. For the scalar complex field with lagrangian $L_{0}$ requirement of local gauge invariance leads us to the ...
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1answer
319 views

Voltage reading between hand and 3.3V source is only 0.1mV. Why?

I held one multimeter probe to a 3.3V source, the other probe I held in my hand. The voltage measured between these 2 points was around ...
1
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1answer
374 views

A question from a Physics 2 exam: About electron cloud an a constant external field:

I am trying to prepare for my exam in Physics $2$, the following is a question from an old exam (the question also have a detailed answer to it, but I don't really understand it). An acceptable ...

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