2
votes
7answers
266 views

Relativity of Simultaniety

In the first figure, A and B are two equidistant points from the observer O in S. In the second figure (reference frame S') the corresponding points are A'and B' such that A'O'=O'B', where O' is the ...
3
votes
1answer
138 views

paradoxical results in different applications of the 2nd law of thermodynamics

Assume two closed systems adjacent to each other together forming one adiabatic system. Both systems are assumed to have their volumes fixed and can therefore communicate with each other through heat ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Future of a universe with scalar field

Assume that $\phi=\phi_0\gg M_{Pl}$, what can you say about the future of a universe in a model with $V(\phi)=\frac{1}{2}m^2\phi^2+\epsilon \phi$, where $|\epsilon|\ll m^2M_{Pl}^2$, is a small ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Does the weight of fluid in a conical container act entirely on the base?

Scenario description Lets assume both containers have a capacity of 300 litres. One is a vertical tube as shown in pic 1 Other one is more or less a V shaped containers as shown in pic 2 Both are ...
8
votes
1answer
480 views

Could the phenomenon of vortex bursting be exploited to reduce wake turbulence?

One of the classic stories in the annals of aerospace engineering is the development (and subsequent redesign) of the F-18 and its Leading Edge Extensions (LEX) due to fatigue problems, problems that ...
5
votes
3answers
330 views

What was the density of the universe when it was only the size of our solar system?

What was the density of the universe when it was only the size of our solar system? Did it approach neutron star density? Is it physically correct to even ask such a question?
1
vote
1answer
340 views

Repulsion and attraction of electric currents

Now, I understand that when a an electron travels, it creates a magnetic field. If you put two wires with current traveling in the same direction they repel, and current traveling in opposite ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

On Thermodynamics of Spontaneity of the Reduction-Oxidation Chemical Reactions

According to the first and second law for a closed system containing different chemicals we have \begin{align} &\delta Q - \delta W = dU = T dS - p dV +\sum_i \mu_i d N_i\\ ...
1
vote
1answer
306 views

What kind of physical quantity is angular displacement?

Angular Displacement is neither a vector nor a scalar. What type of physical quantity it is? Are there any other examples of that physical quantity?
1
vote
1answer
258 views

Conservation of energy and momentum via the continuity equation in asymmetric time and space translation

I am confused about energy and momentum conservation, time and space translation symmetry, and the continuity equation. Suppose we have a mass $m$ in inertial space far from any gravitational ...
2
votes
3answers
78 views

Can we measure rates in real time?

I know what it means to say that my position is "X" at a particular moment in time. I can easily take a picture of my motion and observe my exact location at the instant the picture was taken. That is ...
17
votes
4answers
3k views

Trying to combine red, green and blue to produce white

I tried to mimic the mechanism of typical screens to produce white color out of red, green and blue. What I did is displayed the attached image on the screen, and moved far away as to let the ...
8
votes
2answers
306 views

Why does the Walecka model not include pions?

The Walecka or $\sigma$/$\omega$-model is an effective theory describing nucleon-nucleon interaction by an exchange of $\sigma$/$\omega$-mesons. Why does it not include interactions by pions?
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Is Coulomb's law accurate for moving charges?

Can we use Coulomb's law to calculate the force between two charges which are not at rest? If not, what formula should be used to calculate the force? I searched it, but I couldn't find a clear ...
2
votes
3answers
100 views

In an optical system with a single convex lens, where should the image area be placed in order to take pictures at infinite focus?

I'm trying to learn how camera lenses work, and have gotten stuck. Say that we have an optical system consisting of a single lens with focal length f, and we want to take pictures of objects which are ...
4
votes
2answers
191 views

How hot is aurora?

Has anyone done research on how hot aurora is? I mean if it is plasma it should be hot and since it is emitting mostly green light due to nitrogen (~78%) in the air, could it then be considered that ...
111
votes
3answers
28k views

Why doesn't matter pass through other matter if atoms are 99.999% empty space?

The ghostly passage of one body through another is obviously out of the question if the continuum assumption were valid, but we know that at the micro, nano, pico levels (and beyond) this is not even ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

how does a lizard walk on vertical walls? [duplicate]

One day I was observing a lizard walking on walls as easily as we walk on horizontal surfaces. I got curious to know the physics behind this but I couldn't get to any useful conclusion. I tried to ...
1
vote
1answer
235 views

Gauge pressure clarification

Is gauge pressure always zero-referenced against ambient air pressure? Or is it referenced against the sum of all pressures acting on a fluid, which usually just happens to be ambient air pressure? ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

When they say that the universe cooled after the big bang, where did the heat go?

Layman here, Stumbling through some physics stack posts and started reading the Wikipedia for the chronology of the big bang. In it, it states The very earliest universe was so hot, or energetic, ...
2
votes
1answer
507 views

Why can rolled up capacitors be modelled as flat parallel plates?

If you have two parallel plate of opposite charge with a dielectric in between, then Capacitance, $ C = \frac{A \epsilon_{0}}{d} K$, where $ K $ is the dielectric constant. This is used to calculate ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Does the Higgs boson give mass to ALL other particles? [duplicate]

The Higgs Field gave mass to other particles via spontaneous symmetry breaking; does this mean it gives mass to all particles that have mass - such as neutrinos, quarks or weak bosons and strong ...
3
votes
0answers
304 views

What does it mean to expand a Hamiltonian using perturbation theory?

On UC Davis chemwiki website, the Hamiltonian for quadrupolar coupling in NMR is analyzed. (The details of this aren't important.) It is said in the analysis that: The expansion of the ...
3
votes
1answer
90 views

Justification of discrete spectrum for V(x) unbounded at $\pm \infty$ in Pauling and Wilson

In Pauling and Wilson, Introduction to Quantum Mechanics, they offer the following intuitive reason for the discrete spectrum of a potential which is unbounded at $\pm \infty$: This is ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Is the expansion accelerating or decelerating? [duplicate]

I have already asked this on Astronomy.SE but I couldn't understand the answer there. According to Hubble's Law, the farther a galaxy is, the farther it is moving away. But do we take into account ...
3
votes
1answer
370 views

A question about the Thomson experiment

Recently, I was studying about Thomson's experiment with cathode rays. My textbook shows it like this. It says: When only electric field is applied, the electrons deviate from their path and ...
1
vote
2answers
293 views

Why isn't resistance proportional to distance squared

Here we have a wire. At both ends there is an equal and opposite field caused by a chemical reaction. So, if we decrease or increase the distance between the two points, the strength of the field ...
2
votes
1answer
314 views

Cooper instability

I have a question about the mechanism of Cooper instability. I know the naive picture with two interacting electrons and noninteracting fermi sea wchich leads to the bound state formation. However, if ...
6
votes
1answer
375 views

BBC radiation: What is it?

I'm reading articles about blazars, and in a discussion about models concerning Blazar SEDs (Spectral Energy Densities) there are mentions of different processes: Sychrotron scattering, inverse ...
18
votes
3answers
2k views

Would computers accelerated to high speeds compute “faster” from our point of view?

I woke up to this thought yesterday: Lets say Computers A and B have exactly the same specifications and at time T both are set to process an algorith that would normally take exactly 1 year and ...
2
votes
1answer
170 views

Thermal expansion coefficient times temperature: under which condition is it unity?

In Landau's Fluid Mechanics p. 8 (2nd edition) he writes for the thermal expansion coefficient $\beta = (1/V) (\partial V/\partial T)_P$: For a column of gas in equilibrium which can be taken as a ...
6
votes
5answers
6k views

Can an object reverse its direction of acceleration even though it continues to move in the same direction?

Can anyone please explain me on this matter along with day to day examples?
-1
votes
2answers
208 views

Is fission reaction considered natural or artificial? [closed]

As I learned, nuclear fission doesn't occur without the control of a human made nuclear reactor, by hitting a neutron to a fissile isotope. Thus, the fission reaction is considedred as a part of ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Dropping a ball in a fast moving train

If I drop a ball in a train moving at a constant speed, will it land on the spot I aimed it at or a little away as the train has moved while it was in air? If it lands away, will the observer not know ...
2
votes
0answers
252 views

Copper mean free path dependence on temperature

I'm doing simulations of copper, where the temperature can reach up to ~1300 K. Some calculations depend on the mean free path (MFP) of copper. The only value I've found for it is 39nm and it's ...
2
votes
3answers
152 views

I am learning Quantum Mechanics and I have some questions about some basic concept [closed]

What does a "STATE" exactly mean in quantum mechanics? What is the equivalence of "STATE" in classical mechanics? If we have a wave function $\Psi$ , its absolute square $|\Psi|^2$ is the ...
4
votes
1answer
201 views

Does electromagnetic field collapse the wave function of charged particles?

In an electron double slit experiment, let's put two charged plates behind the slits in an attempt to move the pattern up and down on the the screen. What will happen? Will it just shift the ...
3
votes
2answers
399 views

Most ideal Black-body! [duplicate]

According to the definition of Black-body, it absorbs all of the wavelength irradiates on it. A recent material absorbs 96.4% visible light rays. Therefore , can we say that it is the most closest ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Regarding luminosity monitor of particle collider

I am sorry if my question is completely wrong or foolish I would feel glad to be corrected On the wiki page for Bhabha Scattering, it is mentioned that it is used as luminosity monitor in many ...
0
votes
2answers
213 views

Electrical force between two objects

I tried to solve the following problem: There are 2 objects . The object m1 with charge q and the object m2 with charge q.(same charge).The object m2 is connected with a rope to the ceiling. at the ...
3
votes
1answer
248 views

Explanation of Dirac's proof of arbitrary ket being expressible with eigenkets of observable

In P.A.M. Dirac's The Principles of Quantum Mechanics, Chapter 10 (Observables), pp. 40, at the end of the chapter there is a proof that I don't understand at all. Here is a pdf link to the book ...
4
votes
2answers
178 views

Antipodes are mostly ocean - so what happens after digging that hole through earth?

Digging a hole through earth is a common thought experiment, often used to explain effects of gravity. But what would happen if someone finally dug the hole? Sure, he took care to stabilize and ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Day/night cycle in Greenland

I have heard that in Greenland there is day for 6 months and night for 6 months. Is this true? If so, how does it happen?
0
votes
3answers
182 views

The measurement of electricity

I'm a student trying to understand electricity. As I learned from school, electricity is the flow of electrons, but I'm confused about the measurement of electricity. As I learned, voltage is the ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Understanding velocity gradients in fluids

So I'm having trouble understanding velocity gradients conceptually, I have little physics training passed physics 101 (I'm a biologist), but I'm currently working in an endothelium research lab with ...
6
votes
6answers
1k views

How can molecule of a few angstroms absorb visible light of a few hundred nanometers?

I guess visible light is visible, because it has the right wavelength to be absorbed (or not) and emitted (or not) by many different molecules. Now visible light has a wavelength in the order of a few ...
1
vote
0answers
109 views

Maybe photon energy is constant as the Universe expands?

This is a question following on from my previous post Time-like Killing vector in FRW metric? For simplicity I take the spatially flat FRW metric in cartesian co-ordinates given by: $$ds^2 = -dt^2 + ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Difference between weight of water and pressure of water

(I didn't even have a basic formal education in physics. I'm learning through the internet out of my own interest, so if there are any silly mistakes, kindly bear with and guide me through.) ...
1
vote
0answers
78 views

Noncanonical commutation relation and noncanonical wave mechanics [closed]

Consider noncanonical operators $\hat{x}_1,\hat{x}_2,\hat{p}_1,\hat{p}_2$ satisying the following condition in the $q_1,q_2$ - basis ($\psi=\langle q_1,q_2|\Psi\rangle$)(similar to wave mechanics): ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Calculate electricity generation

A friend of mine stays near a water stream and wanted help to use its water. The height up to which the water could be raised using the water flow is 12ft. How much electricity can it produce? Is it ...

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