8
votes
1answer
686 views

A better conceptual model for cooper pairs in a superconductor

The conceptual model I have been introduced to for cooper pairs in a bulk superconductor is what I would call the "wake" model, where one electron deforms the positively charged lattice, changing the ...
3
votes
0answers
128 views

Question about derivation of tensor in Di Francesco's CFT

This is a question for anyone who is familiar with Di Francesco's book on Conformal Field theory. In particular, on P.108 when he is deriving the general form of the 2-point Schwinger function in two ...
1
vote
3answers
85 views

What is the relationship between $V(t)$ and $V(x,y,z)$

I was recently asked this by a friend. He told me that coming from a physics background, he does not understand $V(t)$ and he believes it is purely theoretical construct made up by circuit ...
1
vote
1answer
281 views

Does the sun “drag the solar system through space”?

In this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jHsq36_NTU#t=55 at 0:55, it is claimed that "the sun is [...] dragging the planets in its wake". Is this true? My understanding is that the sun and ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

AC circuit analysis: Why does current have the same frequency as the voltage?

The above example we have a 50hz AC voltage source. Why is that when we solve for I, I must have frequency of 50 Hz? Is there any phyiscal (non-mathematical) reason to explain this? Thank you
10
votes
5answers
1k views

Is there a classical analog to quantum mechanical tunneling?

In comments to a Phys.SE question, it has been written: 'Tunneling' is perfectly real, even in classical physics. [...] For sufficiently large temperatures this can put the system above a hump in ...
148
votes
3answers
42k views

Surviving under water in air bubble

An incredible news story today is about a man who survived for two days at the bottom of the sea (~30 m deep) in a capsized boat, in an air bubble that formed in a corner of the boat. He was ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Doppler effect and acceleration's impact

Can anyone explain why they say Doppler effect does not depend on acceleration? Would having acceleration not affect the frequency? If the source emits the first circular wave, moving at 50 m/s ...
2
votes
2answers
442 views

A few questions on passive vs active Lorentz transformations

1.) How do we physically interpret an active Lorentz transformation? The passive transformation seems simple enough: you view a fixed object from the perspective of a new observer. When we actively ...
2
votes
2answers
169 views

How to recover units?

Theorists frequently use convenient units like $\hbar=1$ or $m=2$ or whatever is useful to simplify the notation in the problem. And after all the calculations are done the units are recovered based ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Data/signal from a black hole to observe a singularity

I wonder if a situation is possible where, we measure some signal/property concerning a black hole. Supposing the measurement we make with some telescope, gets us the Fourier transform coefficients of ...
0
votes
1answer
333 views

Finding resultant and direction of resultant

In this question- A motorboat is racing towards north at 25km/h and the water current in that region is 10km/hr in the direction of 60 degree east of south. Find the resultant velocity of the ...
10
votes
2answers
962 views

When blowing air through a tube, why does it act differently if I press the tube against my mouth, or hold it an inch away?

So I have a tube of wrapping paper. It's at least a couple of feet long and maybe two inches wide. If I press one end of the tube firmly against my mouth and blow, I barely feel warm air come out ...
1
vote
1answer
168 views

Creation and Annihilation Operators

Let $\widehat{a}^{+}_{i}$ and $\widehat{a}_{i}$ be the usual bosonic creation and annihilation operators. Consider $$\widehat{q}_{i} = \sqrt{\frac{\hbar}{2m_{i}w_{i}}}(\widehat{a}_{i}+ ...
0
votes
1answer
165 views

How do objects even move due to gravity?

I am an newbie general relativistic learner and I learnt that gravity is bending of space-time and since objects move in straight-lines but since its curved they follow curved movement through space ...
6
votes
3answers
572 views

Why are there no elementary charged, spin-zero particles?

In the spirit of a related inquiry, I would like to know if there's a basis for understanding why there aren't any elementary particles that have non-zero electric charge but zero spin? Can such a ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Characteristic length for the diffusion equation (temperature)

The background: I'm doing some simulation work involving the diffusion equation in 1D. Specifically I have some temperature profile, constant thermal conductivity and fixed temperature at each end of ...
4
votes
2answers
137 views

What is the physical structure of light?

Conceptually, I understand what light is, but I don't know what a photon would "look like" if it could be frozen in space/time. For instance, the notion of amplitude seems to be absent when discussing ...
35
votes
3answers
3k views

What is going on in front of and behind a fan?

Why is it that when you drop paper behind a fan, it drops, and is not blown/sucked into the fan, whereas if you drop paper in front of a fan, it is blown away?
0
votes
2answers
91 views

Does a random local unitary destroy entanglement

There is a massive debate raging about whether the wavefunction is an aspect of reality or just a way of handling the data you have about a system. This question is in that vein. A local unitary on ...
2
votes
1answer
134 views

Shallow water wave question from Acheson's book

I am learning Fluid mechanics by reading Acheson's book entitled "Elementary Fluid Dynamics". Below is from problem 3.1. Consider the Euler equation for an ideal fluid in the irrotational case. We ...
2
votes
0answers
64 views

Reference for the reflexion of sound in connection with boundary conditions of the wave equation

In 3D, the homogenous wave equation $$ -\Delta_x u(x,t) + \frac{1}{c^2} \frac{\partial^2 u}{\partial t^2} (x,t) \ = \ 0 \ \ \mathrm{in} \ \Omega \times (0, \infty) $$ can approximately describe ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

How is quantum tunneling possible?

How is quantum tunneling possible? According to quantum mechanics, each particle is represented by a probability density function. This function must be continuous, and therefore when we look at a ...
0
votes
1answer
376 views

Gauss's Law :To find the Electric Field for a Non-Conducting Sphere

While determining the electric field in a Non-Conducting Sphere using Gauss's law,why the positive charges are considered inside the surface,but in determining the electric field in a conducting ...
0
votes
0answers
171 views

Definition of transmission and reflection probability

This is a basic question, but it does not seem to be well defined anywhere. Generally, two terms are mixed somewhat randomly: transmission PROBABILITY and transmission coefficient. So to be clear, ...
1
vote
0answers
63 views

Charge distribution over a finite plate

Let's say we have a tube(simply a cylinder with no top or bottom) with charge $q_1$, radius $r_1$ and length $l_1$ made out of insulating material. There is also a finite conducting plate with sides' ...
1
vote
2answers
143 views

Does distance traveled by a vehicle after its engine has been switched off depend on its mass at all?

A vehicle moving with some velocity on a rough horizontal road finally comes to rest after its engine has been turned off. Intuitively, it seems a vehicle with greater mass would stop first because it ...
0
votes
2answers
93 views

Non-stationary capacitor

A common exercise in non-stationary electromagnetism is to find the electric and the magnetic field generated by a capacitor with round plates, if the potential difference between the plates varies in ...
2
votes
3answers
197 views

Virtual Work: How is the applied force related to the coordinates chosen?

I have a question after reading a section from Goldstein's Classical Mechanics. The question deals with equation 1.43 in the text (given below): $$ \tag{1.43} \sum\limits_{i} {\bf F}_i^{(a)}\cdot ...
2
votes
1answer
108 views

Electric charge of light? [duplicate]

Light (or any radiation as a matter of fact) is an electromagnetic wave so why doesn't it have a electric charge associated with it? As far as I know only static or flowing electric chargers can ...
2
votes
1answer
264 views

Tensor Product of a Bra and a Ket

What does one get if the take the tensor product of a bra and a ket, for instance, $\langle\uparrow \rvert \otimes \lvert \downarrow\rangle$? What I mean it, what is this object? What does it act on? ...
0
votes
3answers
4k views

How do I find the tension in additional strings in this problem? [closed]

A mass of 5.00 kg hangs attached to three strings as shown in the figure (see image below). Find the tension in each string. Hint: Consider the equilibrium of the point where the strings join. ...
3
votes
1answer
101 views

Sound pressure and velocity pressure concepts vs loudness

Here is my understanding and question: Atmospheric pressure is around 101325 Pa. Our ear drum is exposed to this pressure from both sides so total pressure is zero. But when we hear sound, ear drum ...
3
votes
2answers
816 views

Physical meaning of imaginary part of Electric field?

As far as I know (or I thought I knew), if we have an electric field $$\mathbf{E}=\mathbf{E_0}\cos(\omega t - kx),$$ we can define it as the real part of $$\mathbf{E}=Re(\mathbf{E_0}e^{i(\omega t - ...
2
votes
3answers
168 views

How to do linear stability analysis on this system of ODEs?

I was trying to do linear stability analysis of spring pendulum. I arrived at the differential equations which describe the system. But I am unable to proceed to linear stability analysis. Is it ...
3
votes
1answer
218 views

Graph Theory and Feynman Integrals

In Vladimir A. Smirnov's book Analytic Tools for Feynman Integrals, Section 2.3, the alpha representation of general Feynman integral takes the form $$ F_{\Gamma}(q_1,\ldots,q_n;d) = ...
0
votes
3answers
250 views

Does the magnitude of an electrical field change with frequency?

I am trying to model the frequency response of a force (dielectrophoresis) that is based on gradient of an electric field. One of the components is the CM factor which has a frequency component, but ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Quantum mechanics for macroscopic charges?

OK first off tell me if my understanding of the following is correct: In a Hydrogen atom, one would expect that the opposite charges (electron and nucleus) to attract each other, according to ...
4
votes
4answers
542 views

Quantum mechanics threshold

First of all I beg your forgiveness as I am not a physicist and the question I am going to ask may sound silly. I am aware that beyond a certain threshold in the hierarchy of building blocks of ...
20
votes
2answers
2k views

What exactly do we see on the famous neutrino image of the sun?

An answer to the question If we could build a neutrino telescope, what would we see? contains a link to a neutrino image of the sun by the Super-Kamiokande neutrino detector. There it says that ...
3
votes
1answer
290 views

Does the electron have spin in its own reference frame?

In our atomic physics class, we saw that the spin-orbit coupling term arises from the scalar product of the magnetic moment of the electron (proportional to its spin), and the magnetic field created ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

In real laser applications, how big is the complex parameter (i.e. <n>) of the corresponding coherent state of the field?

In quantum optics, the output from a laser is modelled using a coherent state; what are some orders-of-magnitude for the complex parameter (usually denoted $\alpha$) of the coherent state ...
2
votes
1answer
106 views

Faster spinning moon

Let's say we somehow speed up the moon's rotation. (I'm thinking about a big asteroid smashing into it, but I'm open to better ideas.) Here are some questions: How fast could we get the moon to spin ...
5
votes
6answers
29k views

Why are volume and pressure inversely proportional to each other?

It makes sense, that if you have a balloon and press it down with your hands, the volume will decrease and the pressure will increase. This confirms Boyle's Law, $ pV=k=nRT $. But what if the ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

How to calculate the buoyant force on a balloon at different altitudes [duplicate]

For a project into balloon simulation I'd like to know how the force on a balloon changes with altitude: I know that the Buoyant force on a balloon is: $F = (\rho_{air} - \rho_{helium})gV$ Using ...
0
votes
1answer
76 views

DO the condensed photon particles-waves-longitudinal-waves exist? [closed]

This is kind of hard to explain, because weird as it sounds, i have experienced a phenomenon that i would like to see if it exists and if i can explain it mathematically. The longitudinal waves of ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

How do you actually cool the atoms to create the Bose-Einstein Condensate?

What is the actual way you cool atoms to a low enough temperature that you can observe their quantum behavior at a macroscopic level, like in the Bose-Einstein Condensate? ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Change in momentum [duplicate]

A cube has a side length of 20 cm. An atom in the gas moves around the cube as shown. It continually bounces off the four lateral walls of the cube. The atom has a mass of 6.6×10−27 kg. Because of the ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Earth-Moon system

While learning about motion of centre of mass, I came across this statement online, It is also more accurate to say that the Earth and Moon together revolve about their common center of mass. ...
1
vote
1answer
789 views

How to use accelaration data of moving object to calculate distance?

I read couple of similar question on this forum and few blogs on web, though I am still confused,I am determined to calculate object displacement using accelerometer data. So, I tried using ...

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