0
votes
2answers
69 views

Has anyone studied a statistical scaling law for the universe? [closed]

How do named objects in the universe scale? Is there a predictable curve for an ordered list, say {atom, animal, planet, solar system, galaxy, etc}? Can you then use the analysis to predict when the ...
3
votes
2answers
102 views

can we have a parallel earth made of dark matter?

In the sense that the two planets move together and has intelligent beings with their own forces and particles, but they just do not interact with (are invisible to) us?
1
vote
2answers
318 views

Geometrical interpretation of complex eigenvectors in a system of differential equations

Let's consider a system of differential equations in the form $$\dot{X} = M X$$ in two dimensions ($X = (x(t), y(t))$). In the case that $M$ has real values, it is easy to give a geometric ...
2
votes
1answer
346 views

Ricci identity/Riemann curvature tensor and covectors

Can somebody please explain to me how the following statement is true? The Riemann curvature tensor $R^c_{dab}$ is given by the Ricci identity $$(\nabla_a\nabla_b-\nabla_b\nabla_a)V^c\equiv ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Goldstein's Classical Mechanics exercises solutions [duplicate]

Does anyone know where I can find some (good) solution of Goldstein's book Classical Mechanics?
0
votes
1answer
158 views

Potential of a conductor depends on the size and shape of the conductor. How?

1) When a charge 'q' is given to an isolated conductor, its potential will change. 2) The change in potential depends on the size and shape of the conductor. I could understand the point no. 1. ...
6
votes
1answer
221 views

Noether's identities

I have some questions about the Noether's second theorem (generally not covered by field theory books): What is the most general Noether identity for (classical) field theories? Why are Noether ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

Gaussian surface in a charged infinite plance sheet

The following question arises on the use of Gauss law. In the charged finite sheet problem, we consider a Gaussian surface on only one side of the sheet. But, In the case of an infinite sheet, we ...
-6
votes
1answer
95 views

Energy flows in the core also responsible for another of the planet’s unique [closed]

Energy flows in the core also responsible for another of the planet’s unique features: a strong magnetic field. Scientists believe that the earth has had a magnetic field for at least 3.5 billion ...
5
votes
1answer
671 views

What does it mean to integrate out fields from a theory?

I've done a fair bit of reading on this subject and I'm still confused about the basic principle of integrating out fields in QFT. When we have a function of 2 fields a and b, f(a,b), and we integrate ...
1
vote
2answers
212 views

Does Earth produce metallic elements in its core?

Does Earth produce metallic elements in its core?
2
votes
1answer
955 views

What is Transverse Energy?

What is transverse energy? Why we use transverse total energy instead of energy and transverse momentum in place of Total momentum in the particle detectors?
5
votes
1answer
248 views

How did Newton find out force has something to do with acceleration?

Its about Newton's second law of motion, $$F=ma.$$ It says the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force and is inversely proportional to the object's mass. Yes I can ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Understanding Einstein's field equation

Einstein's field equation: $$G_{\mu\nu} = \frac{8\pi G}{c^4}T_{\mu\nu} - g_{\mu\nu}\Lambda$$ I'm trying to understand each of the terms in this equation intuitively, but I'm struggling. Basically, ...
1
vote
2answers
239 views

What is the most natural value of Heaviside step function at zero argument?

In many physical applications, the Heaviside step fuction is defined as $$H(x) = \left\{\begin{eqnarray} 1, \quad x>0 \\ 0, \quad x<0 \end{eqnarray}\right.$$ The value $H(0)$ is left undefined. ...
5
votes
3answers
243 views

We're all star dust?

OK so we've all heard of this from Carl Sagan, Lawrence Krauss and others and we know the argumentation, I don't refute that. There are other examples, for instance I once calculated (this was before ...
51
votes
9answers
5k views

What makes running so much less energy-efficient than bicycling?

Most people can ride 10 km on their bike. However, running 10 km is a lot harder to do. Why? According to the law of conservation of energy, bicycling should be more intensive because you have to ...
0
votes
3answers
208 views

Mass equals Moment of inertia when constant density?

I have found equation for moment of inertia $(J)$. I'm calculating $J$ for hemisphere, with rotational axis $Z$. $$ J = \iiint\limits_V r^2 \cdot \rho \cdot dV $$ But if $\rho$ is constant ...
1
vote
5answers
2k views

Workdone in an equipotential surface is zero?

An equipotential surface is one in which all the points are at the same electric potential. If a charge is to be moved between any two points (say from point A to point B) on an equipotential surface, ...
1
vote
2answers
287 views

Concerning the curvature of an airfoil (shape)

I am wondering about the reasons for the shape of a turbine blade airfoil, see here Do you know the reason for this shape? Usually, very large curvatures like this are to extract high lift from LOW ...
-1
votes
1answer
91 views

Determine KE of electron given momentum & mass [closed]

Some info: wavelength of electron: $2.78 \times 10^{-10}$ momentum of electron: $2.38 \times 10^{-24}$ Determine KE of electron. In a provided hint: $KE = \frac{p^2}{2m}$. So I have: $$KE = ...
5
votes
4answers
493 views

Physical Interpretation of the Integrand of the Feynman Path Integral

In quantum mechanics, we think of the Feynman Path Integral $\int{D[x] e^{\frac{i}{\hbar}S}}$ (where $S$ is the classical action) as a probability amplitude (propagator) for getting from $x_1$ to ...
0
votes
3answers
247 views

Is there absolute proof that an object cannot exceed the speed of light?

Have any known experiments ruled out travelling faster than the speed of light? Or is this just a widely accepted theory?
2
votes
3answers
251 views

What truly is mass, and is there a direct way to measure it?

We know a mass of an object of one kilogram as an object that weighs W = mg = 9.8 N and we reference it to that, (when it should as a fundamental parameter describe weight not the opposite). But if we ...
2
votes
2answers
615 views

Vector representation of wavefunction in quantum mechanics?

I am new to quantum mechanics, and I just studied some parts of "wave mechanics" version of quantum mechanics. But I heard that wavefunction can be represented as vector in Hilbert space. In my eye, ...
3
votes
3answers
146 views

Does a cross really have a smaller area moment of inertia than a square of the same area?

I need to calculate the area moment of inertia of a cross for a homework assignment. The cross is a symmetric plus sign: _ | | |== ==| | | - ...
2
votes
1answer
76 views

Probability Current in a time-varying scalar potential

I know that a vector potential has to be taken into account for the schrödinger probability current: $$\vec{j}=\frac{1}{2m} \left[ \Psi^*\hat{\vec{p}}\Psi-\Psi\hat{\vec{p}}\Psi^* - 2q\vec{A} |\Psi|^2 ...
5
votes
4answers
860 views

Does entanglement not immediately contradict the theory of special relativity?

Does entanglement not immediately contradict the theory of special relativity? Why are people still so convinced nothing can travel faster than light when we are perfectly aware of something that ...
1
vote
2answers
120 views

Heating and Recooling of an Object

Consider a piece of metal of length $L$ and linear thermal expansion coefficient $\alpha$. We eat the metal $\Delta T$ degrees, causing the metal to increase to length $$ L' = L + L \alpha \Delta T$$ ...
1
vote
1answer
919 views

Uncertainty Principle and Energy range for an electron in an atom

I have the following exercise: Use Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and the relation $\Delta u = \sqrt{\langle u^2 \rangle - \langle u \rangle^2}$ to find the range of energy an electron has in an ...
5
votes
0answers
131 views

Looking for modern results in semiclassical physics and relevant references

What are some important approximations, especially those that are state-of-the-art, used to approximate the many-body dynamics of atoms and molecules in the semiclassical regime? To be clear, I'm not ...
23
votes
1answer
499 views

Overcharging a black hole

Hubeny's 1998 paper got a lot of people interested in determining whether cosmic censorship can be violated by dropping too much charge onto a black hole. It suggested that you might be able to get a ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

How much refraction occurs as a fraction of all reflection and refraction?

When light reaches a boundary between materials below the critical angle, some of it refracts and some of it reflects. For example, glass acts as a partial mirror with a dark background. Assuming ...
1
vote
2answers
335 views

Semi-major axis and ellipticity of a binary system?

In the image below (source at bottom), it seems to be suggesting that \begin{equation} a = a_{1} + a_{2}, \hspace{8cm}(1) \end{equation} where $a_{1}$ and $a_{2}$ are the semi-major axis of the ...
1
vote
1answer
172 views

Quantum graph theory: complex spectra

In quantum graph theory, what are the properties of a given graph to own complex conjugated complex eigenvalues, either finite or infinite? Spectral graph theory is as far as I know a not completely ...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

Spectral properties of CFT

What are the general spectral properties of CFT? I mean what is the "spectrum"/eigenvalues of CFT in 2d and d>2 spacetime dimensions? I understand the "spectrum" and "Fock space" realization of Dirac ...
4
votes
1answer
158 views

What happens at the interface between two universes with opposite thermodynamic arrows of time? [closed]

I was trying to think but cannot figure it out. For instance, if the interaction is small, for instance limited to a windows, the observers in each universe will see that the other goes in reverse. ...
4
votes
0answers
100 views

Relation of the Bloch-Siegert shift to the rotating pot lid

I see in Wikipedia that the Bloch-Siegert shift is analogies to the rotating pot lid, could you explain that analogy? The Bloch-Siegert shift is a phenomenon in quantum physics that becomes ...
3
votes
1answer
573 views

How does a star ignite?

I remember reading that X-Rays are generated by 'braking' electrons in a Coolidge tube. Is it fundamentally a matter that the extreme gravity immediately before a star ignites is so strong that it ...
6
votes
2answers
629 views

Could some design of a propeller be used in both air and water?

Propellers in water are smaller in diameter. They also move more slowly. On the other hand, aircraft propellers are larger in diameter, have narrower blades and operate at very high speeds. An ...
2
votes
0answers
169 views

Analytical solution of two level system driving by a sinusoidal potential beyond rotating wave approximation

A quantum mechanical two-level system driving by a constant sinusoidal external potential is very useful in varies areas of physics. Although the wildly used rotating-wave approximation(RWA) is very ...
3
votes
2answers
363 views

Photon as the carrier of the electromagnetic force

My physics background goes as "far" as reading popsci books on QM, Particle Physics, and Cosmology so pardon my ignorance in the below questions. I've read that the photon is the particle (quanta in ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

A sphere, a simple object?

In this video, the woman says that a sphere is a pretty simple object. What intrigues me is the use of a sphere for such a calculation. First of all, the sphere wouldn't be perfect as a perfect sphere ...
6
votes
1answer
323 views

English translation of Helmholtz' paper: “On the Physical Significance of the Principle of Least Action”

I am asking about an English translation of a Helmholtz paper: Ueber die physikalische Bedeutung des Princips der kleinsten Wirkung. Journal für die reine und angewandte Mathematik (Crelle's ...
-1
votes
1answer
103 views

How do we know that light is massless? [duplicate]

Almost everybody knows that light is massless. But where this come from and how it can be proven (experimentally or theoretically)? I actually found this article which explains and calculates the mass ...
2
votes
1answer
357 views

Simple harmonic oscillator system and changes in its total energy

Suppose I have a body of mass $M$ connected to a spring (which is connected to a vertical wall) with a stiffness coefficient of $k$ on some frictionless surface. The body oscillates from point $C$ to ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Can virtual image be photographed

Is there any instrument that can photograph a virtal image? How would such a device work?
1
vote
2answers
129 views

Can acceleration feel like constant gravity for indefinitely long?

So here's the setup: I'm in a spaceship, without windows as always, and the ship is accelerating upwards at a constant rate of $1\,\text{g}$. So inside the spaceship it feels like I'm being pulled ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

Why the direction of dipole moment is from negative charge to positive charge?

An electric dipole moment is defined as $p = q\times 2d$. How to understand it physically? Why the direction of the electric dipole moment is from negative charge to positive charge?
3
votes
2answers
920 views

Is there any example where electric and magnetic fields are not perpendicular?

Perpendicular electric and magnetic field creates light or other electromagnetic waves. Is it a necessary property to have a perpendicular fields? If not what would happen when the fields are not ...

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