7
votes
1answer
229 views

Reference Request: Classical Mechanics with Symplectic Reduction

I am trying to find a supplement to appendix of Cushman & Bates' book on Global aspects of Classical Integrable Systems, that is less terse and explains mechanics with Lie groups (with dual of Lie ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Showing a fourth rank tensor in $\epsilon$'s reduces to one in the metric $g$

Consider the fourth rank tensor $$S_{\mu \nu \rho \sigma} = a(\epsilon_{\mu \sigma}\epsilon_{\nu \rho} + \epsilon_{\mu \rho}\epsilon_{\nu \sigma})f(x^2),$$ in 2D where $a$ is a constant and $f(x^2)$ ...
1
vote
2answers
71 views

Bloch theorem, Energy, Free electron

I'm trying to learn on my own a bit of solid physics to tackle semiconductors afterwards. I'm struggling with the Energy versus $k$ diagrams for a free electron which shows that for a single value of ...
1
vote
2answers
62 views

Airplane on a treadmill [duplicate]

I've heard conflicting answers, and would like to see the record set straight: An jet/propeller airplane is traveling on a giant treadmill at takeoff speed. Will the plane takeoff, or will it remain ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

What is the speed of light from a star moving towards a observer.? [duplicate]

We can say that in vacuum speed of light is constant. But if the star is moving with a certain velocity does it add that velocity to the velocity of photons emitted out of that star?
0
votes
1answer
18 views

hydraulic scissor jack lifting capacity

Can you please assist with a really simple question? I have a hydraulic scissor jack table with the following: 2 hydraulic cylinders, each with a cylinder stroke of 240mm, a cylinder bore of 50mm ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

calculating electrodynamic momentum of a dumbbell (consisting of two point charges) in longitudinal motion

I'm working through a paper on momentum in electrodynamics that requires the integration below and would greatly appreciate any help. I'm pretty sure it evaluates to $2/d$ but I can't quite figure ...
3
votes
0answers
48 views

What is the idea behind counting the number of excited states and the representation of a group ?

While reading Polchinski's Chapter 1, I encountered the following on page 24, "For example, the $(D-1)$ dimensional vector representation of $SO(D-1)$ breaks up into an invariant and a $(D-2)$-vector ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Which function denotes the energy of thermal motion within a system?

In thermodynamics, the heat $Q$ is defined as a type of energy in transfer, and is not a state function, which function denotes the energy of thermal motion within a system? 1) $TS$, (there is a ...
1
vote
1answer
73 views

What is the significance of the difference in the eigenvalue equations of Bloch functions for electrons vs photons?

any text on photonic crystals will highlight the almost perfect analogy between electrons in a periodic potential and photons in a periodic dielectric. The analogies are: $$V(\vec r + \vec R) = ...
2
votes
0answers
29 views

Partition function of classical quadrupole in an electric field

The partition function of a dipole in an electric field is a well-known problem, analytical solvable (nice integral, can be calculated with pen and paper), for example in the Langevin treatment of ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

How can sound waves propagate through air?

We know that the sound waves propagate through air, and it can't travel through vacuum. so the thing that help it doing that is the air's molecules pressure. So my question how can that happens? I ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Why are results of Bell's experiments considered to “break realism”?

Related to my previous question (Why would classical correlation in Bell's experiment be a linear function of angle?), as a newbie in quantum mechanics, I am also unable to find the reason to why ...
2
votes
0answers
40 views

Is the second law of thermodynamics a real law? [duplicate]

Everytime I ask people why the second law of thermodynamics is true, they say because the probability of entropy increasing is very large. This for some reason doesn't seem right for me. Just because ...
1
vote
1answer
73 views

A well-defined quantum probability in the beginning of the universe?

In mathematics or statistics, a well defined probability requires a large sample space. However, in the beginning of the universe, when the first quantum collapse happened, the sample space contains ...
1
vote
2answers
47 views

Who proposed the bulk-edge correspondence principle?

Who proposed the bulk-edge correspondence principle? The principle is often quoted in counting the number of zero energy states localized on the interface between two insulators with distinct band ...
3
votes
0answers
23 views

Bosons are either gapped or condensated, except physical principle protected cases (Goldstone boson, photon)?

Bosons are either gapped or condensated, except physical principle protected cases (Goldstone boson, photon, etc.)? I read this in a paper (version1 of http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.3728v1, 1st page 1st ...
0
votes
3answers
125 views

Measurement of quantum state

Consider a particle in a box system.Assume its state to be a superposition of the ground and the first excited energy states.Consider two observers A and B (rest of the world).A made the measurement ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

What does temperature look like at the subatomic level?

I am trying to get a better understanding of the definition of temperature at the subatomic level. I have a background in molecular biology with some college physics, but no deep quantum mechanics ...
0
votes
2answers
40 views

How to treat Dirac delta function of two variable?

We can treat one variable delta function as $$\delta(f(x)) = \sum_i\frac{1}{|\frac{df}{dx}|_{x=x_i}} \delta(x-x_i).$$ Then how do we treat two variable delta function, such as $\delta(f(x,y))$? ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

How to find the potential energy? [duplicate]

how to find the potential energy of a particle with variable mass and variable coordinate ? Data that is to compute, only the mass and Cartesian coordinate of the particle, like this: x;m ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

Is the resistance 0 in the ballistic regime?

Given that in the ballistic regime a particle (electron) can move freely without scattering (there are no impurities ), is the resistance through a ballistic sample zero?
1
vote
1answer
66 views
+50

Boundary Element Method or Boundary Integral Method Computational Aspects

I have to solve a Helmholtz equation inside a simply connected domain. I know that in general the boundary integral can be written as, $$\phi(x)=\int_V G(x,x') \rho(x')\ d^3x'+\int_S ...
2
votes
2answers
67 views

Explanation for $M{\ddot{r}}=-\nabla \phi$

Could someone please explain this equation $$M\bf {\ddot{r}}=-\nabla \phi$$ Where $\bf r$ is a position vector and $\phi$ is the potential function. Could someone brief explain the potential function ...
5
votes
1answer
125 views

Force problem related to adhesive and bonding

I have two PCBs (printed circuit board), and they are glued by adhesives, as show in the pictures. And the location of the adhesives are indicated on the picture (please notice that NO adhesive is ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Geometric Interpretation of Rotated basis of Hamiltonian and collective Dicke states

Suppose I start with a basis of states for a two spin-1/2 particle system, namely, $\{\left|\uparrow\uparrow\right\rangle, \left|\downarrow\downarrow\right\rangle, ...
4
votes
3answers
81 views

How can a detector distinguish between a photon and a gluon

Considering that both gluons and photons have no mass, no charge and spin 1, I was wondering how one can tell the difference, if they hit a detector after a collision at the LHC. I know that gluons ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Macroscopic Forces from QED

In QED the carrier for electromagnetic interaction is a photon, while macroscopic forces are due to electromagnetic interaction (by macroscopic forces I mean: normal force, object collision, friction ...
3
votes
2answers
59 views

Uniqueness of W,Z bosons

What is real reason for considering only ONE unique W and Z bosons, and not of 3 separate flavors, in the Standard Model?
12
votes
4answers
1k views

If I shine a bright light on a neutron star, what would it look like?

If there are no orbitting electrons in a neutron star's makeup to interact with EM, what happens to light that strikes it?
7
votes
1answer
101 views

Recommendation on mathematical physics book of Symplectic geometry

I want to learn the applications of symplectic geometry in physics. Which mathematical physics textbook will have a detailed and heuristic explanation of this aspect?
2
votes
1answer
808 views

How is Mechanical advantage of Wedge = length of slope/width

Mechanical advantage is defined as Force Output/Force Input For a symmetrical wedge with the length of the slopes being equal and the width being the distance between the end points, articles quote ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Heat flow in a hollow cylinder

Consider a hollow cylinder of different outer radius and inner radius and two different temperatures are maintained at the outer and inner surfaces such that inner temperature is higher. Because of ...
21
votes
5answers
6k views

Is this kids experiment a legitimate way to show that air has mass?

Consider the experiment in this link. The experiment includes using a ruler as a lever, with an inflated balloon on one side and a balloon which is not inflated on the other. The aim of the ...
3
votes
1answer
846 views

Relationship between slit size and wavelength in diffraction

Almost in every book on physics we can find a statement like "diffraction gets stronger when the size of the slit is comparable to the wavelength". Let's say we have a wall in a bathtub with a slit in ...
0
votes
1answer
667 views

Magnetic field inside and outside cylinder with varying current density

I am reading through Introduction to Electrodynamics by David J. Griffiths and came across the following problem: A steady current $I$ flows down a long cylindrical wire of radius $a$. Find the ...
3
votes
2answers
40 views

Why would classical correlation in Bell's experiment be a linear function of angle?

Sorry if it's a newbie question, but I have trouble understanding the following part in the Wikipedia's explanation for the Bell's theorem: With the measurements oriented at intermediate angles ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

Generalization of relation between charge and magnetic moment

In classical theory, for electrons or protons, charge and angular momentum combine to give the magnetic moment. Does a similar consequence hold for the generalization of charge to other forces, like ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Copper coils for nMRI

Given the lack of financial efficacy in the medical industry, I was wondering if nuclear magnetic resonance imaging would be possible with a copper/silver coil if the use is short 10 second imaging ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Does spin-0 or spin-2 describe massive or massless particles?

spin-0 is massive or massless? How does we separate the massive and massless degrees of freedom for spin-2? What is the partially massive?
2
votes
2answers
52 views

Can the magnetic fields of EM radiation be harnessed or measured?

We use the electric component of EM radiation to create the EM radiation and to detect it (antennas and Etc.), but does anyone know of a situation where the magnetic component of EM radiation is used? ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

F-mu-nu notation [on hold]

This is a really simple question that I cannot find an answer to, strangely enough. What do these (similar) notations stand for: $F^{\mu\nu}$ $F_{\mu}^{\nu}$ $F^{a\mu\nu}$ etc etc.
2
votes
2answers
37 views

Reference on electrodynamics with tempered distributions

Back in my undergrad I had a course on classical electrodynamics where the fields had values in the space of tempered distributions. In this way one could correctly treat self-interaction and ...
3
votes
5answers
1k views

Why aren't units with powers, like cm³, surrounded by parentheses?

Since $\renewcommand{\unit}[1]{\,\mathrm{#1}} 1\unit{dm} = 10^{-1}\unit{m}$, it follows that $1\unit{dm^3} = 10^{-1} \times 10^{-1} \times 10^{-1} \unit{m^3} = 10^{-3} \unit{m^3}$. However, in ...
0
votes
3answers
643 views

How to determine direction of forces in a static problem?

I am consistently getting this wrong. To me, in the picture below, it would make sense that the structure would be pulling downward, and the cable BD would be pulling upward - thus the system is in ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

parity invariance of Einstein, Maxwell and Dirac Lagrangians

How can we show that Einstein, Maxwell and Dirac Lagrangians are parity invariant?
3
votes
2answers
40 views

Why doesn't water in water barometer boil?

I have read that the pressure in a water barometer at the top of the water column is around 0.5 psi and at such low pressures water should boil at around ~26°C (Room temperature). [1] [2] How ...
3
votes
1answer
88 views
+200

Negative energy/mass bounds on de-Sitter spacetime

There exists a Positive Energy theorem for General Relativity in Anti-de Sitter and asymptotically flat spacetimes, but there is no equivalent theorem for de Sitter spacetimes Question: Is there ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Magnetic field of a stationary electron

As far as I know, a magnetic field can only be produced by a moving electric charge, or from a particle's spin (this is how a permanent magnet works, all the spins are in the same direction) What is ...
2
votes
1answer
76 views

Ground State Energy in Euclidean Spacetime

Calculating the transition amplitude in Euclidean spacetime is useful because from it we can extract the ground state energy and ground state wave-functions values. For example, let's assume we are ...

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