2
votes
1answer
1k views

Drag force at high speeds [duplicate]

The drag force on a spherical body according to Stokes' law is given by $$F = 6π\mu rv$$ Where $\mu$ is the dynamic viscosity of the fluid, $r$ is the radius of the spherical object, and $v$ is its ...
0
votes
1answer
236 views

Isn't this wikipedia equation of navier-stokes actually wrong? [closed]

There is a wikipedia page about NS Existance and Smoothness It seems to me that the Navier Stokes equations is wrong? (because in one side of equal sign unit is $\frac {m}{s^2}$ but in other side it ...
8
votes
4answers
9k views

Direction of angular velocity

Angular velocity is the rate of angular displacement about an axis. Its direction is determined by right hand rule. According to right hand rule, if you hold the axis with your right hand and rotate ...
0
votes
1answer
481 views

What is Equilibrium Equivalent Concentration (EEC)?

Recently I am doing a research about radon measurement. During the process I met two concepts named Equilibrium Equivalent Concentration (EEC) and Potential Alpha Energy Concentration (PAEC), but ...
2
votes
1answer
375 views

Why is $\{Q, P\} = 1$ for a canonical transformation?

Why is $\{Q, P\} = 1$ for a canonical transformation? Given $P(p,q)$ and $Q(p,q)$.
1
vote
2answers
11k views

Relation between work, kinetic energy and potential energy

We derived two equations in class. The work done between two points $A$, $B$ is equal to the difference between the kinetic energy at the last point and the one at the first point. The work done ...
0
votes
1answer
205 views

Reflection of a Plane Wave at Oblique Incidence

I am still trying to prepare for my electromagnetics preliminary exam, but I find myself stuck on understanding the origins of Eqs. 10.105a, 10.105b, 10.106a, and 10.106b on page 453 of Elements of ...
0
votes
1answer
357 views

Wavefunction operators and the observable [closed]

So I got this from the exam I had yesterday. I couldn't really answer it other and it played on my mind through the night Show that if a wave function $\psi$ , is an eigenfunction of an operator [Q], ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Where does the Pauli Repulsive Force come from that counteracts the attraction between atoms and ions? [duplicate]

I'm learning about such things as ionic and covalent bonds, and the reason given for the ionic bonds is electrostatic attraction. However, if that were true, then the two ions would accelerate toward ...
0
votes
0answers
70 views

Same Plane Polarization of Light

When light impacts a surface, how does it know what direction to be polarized? I'd prefer a conceptual answer, there are randomly polarized photons impacting random molecules that can be randomly ...
7
votes
1answer
222 views

Sound Propagation using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) considering wind effects

I am trying to plot the propagation of sound from a fixed source in a 2D environment using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Method taking into account the effects of the wind velocity. I came ...
1
vote
1answer
105 views

vertical wind gradients in the atmospheric boundary layer

I'm reading the following paper: Intercomparison of Bulk Aerodynamic Algorithms for the Computation of Sea Surface Fluxes Using TOGA COARE and TAO Data and am having trouble working through ...
3
votes
1answer
853 views

Is a 3 LED flashlight brighter than a single LED one? (same LEDs, same power through each LED)

Say I have one LED in a flashlight, it produces some light. Now, if I have 3 of those LEDs in the same flashlight, each LED receiving the same amount of energy than the single LED was receiving in ...
-1
votes
2answers
320 views

What's a “noninertial frame”? [duplicate]

In some PSE questions or answers such as here (and comments below) there appears the notion of "accelerating frame" or (more or less equivalently) "noninertial frame". What's the definition of this ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

Writing wave functions with spin of a system of particles

Suppose I have 2 fermions in a potential $V(x)$. Both particles are moving in one dimension: the $x$ axis. Then, neglecting the interaction between the particles, the spatial wave function of the ...
11
votes
3answers
1k views

Can a magnet damage a compass?

I've heard the claim before that a magnet can ruin a compass, and was about to repeat it to my son when I realized it sounds like complete nonsense. Googling turned up such unsubstantiated and ...
3
votes
1answer
108 views

Mass loss in Red Giants via dusty-winds and chromosphere activity

I'm reading some literature on mass loss in the RGB/AGB branches and so far I'm getting a lot of information regarding mass loss via dusty-winds/pulsations but almost no explanation of mass loss by '...
4
votes
0answers
219 views

Angular momentum of particle in dipole magnetic field

Basically I'm just trying to find the expression for the angular momentum of a particle of mass $m$ and charge $q$ in a dipole magnetic field. In cylindrical coordinates, $\vec{v}=v_{\rho}\hat{\rho}+...
17
votes
3answers
1k views

Spontaneous symmetry breaking in classical mechanics, quantum mechanics and quantum field theory

I wondered if someone could help me understand spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) in classical mechanics, quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. Consider a Higgs-like potential, with a local ...
3
votes
1answer
323 views

How can “quantum particles have positive masses, even though the classical waves travel at the speed of light”?

Clay Mathematics Institute writes about the Yang-Mills and mass gap problem on this page http://www.claymath.org/millennium/Yang-Mills_Theory/: The successful use of Yang-Mills theory to describe ...
9
votes
1answer
5k views

Derivation of differential scattering cross-section

I'm trying to follow the derivation of the Boltzmann equation in my Theory of Heat script, but have a little trouble understanding the following: The cross-section $d\sigma$ is defined as: The amount ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Question regarding Drift velocity in general?

The derivation of drift velocity in case of electrons is equivalent to the case of an charged ionic gas and therefore all the arguments also apply there. Now for an ideal "ionic" gas which interacts ...
4
votes
0answers
151 views

The interaction picture doesn't exist? [duplicate]

I have recently encountered Haag's theorem and according to Wikipedia: Rudolf Haag postulated [1] that the interaction picture does not exist in an interacting, relativistic quantum field theory (...
-1
votes
1answer
76 views

Is the universe we know just shaped due to time? [closed]

Call me a daydreamer, but I could not stop myself for asking this question. I was idle when something ticked me and struck my head. I was thinking about universe, speed of light, and how time works. ...
6
votes
2answers
845 views

A kind of Noether's theorem for the Hamiltonian formalism

How can I (conveniently?) show that an invariance of the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian (i.e. the kinetic as well as the potential energy are independently invariant) will lead to a conservation law using ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

What physical sense has following transformation?

Let's have an interval expression for Friedmann Universe with 3-metric of a sphere, $$ ds^{2} = c^{2}dt^{2} - c^{2}\frac{ch^{2}(Ht)}{H^{2}}\left( d\rho^{2} + sin^{2}(\rho )(d\theta^{2} + sin^{2}(\...
1
vote
2answers
89 views

Aggregating daily readings with units of parts per million

I have a series of daily readings (NOx emissions) measured in parts per million. I need to aggregate the daily readings into a monthly measure. Clearly a sum operation will be incorrect (parts per ...
1
vote
0answers
90 views

Difference between $K_{\alpha}$, $K_{\beta}$ and binding energies

I'm having a small question regarding $K_{\alpha}$ and $K_{\beta}$ emissions. If I'm not mistaken this happens when there is a transition from the L shell to the K shell (Depending on the orbital), ...
2
votes
0answers
126 views

Derivation of impact free Boltzmann equation

When deriving the impact-free boltzmann equation ( $\frac{\partial f}{\partial t} + \vec{v} \cdot\frac{\partial f}{\partial \vec{x}} + \vec{a} \cdot \frac{\partial f}{\partial \vec{v}} = 0$) I have a ...
2
votes
1answer
94 views

Why is the Pegasus launched from a subsonic airplane?

Considering that the reason typically given for launching spacecraft from sea-level as opposed to mountains is that the limiting factor is velocity, not altitude, then why isn't the Pegasus rocket ...
26
votes
4answers
6k views

Is space “real”, or is it some sort of accepted postulate?

What is space? It seems to be everywhere in the equations of physics, as some sort of postulate or hidden hypothesis. We also have a direct experience of it, but is it "real"? The fact that we ...
1
vote
2answers
134 views

In which direction does the electron move during an electronic transition?

Let's imagine a molecule and put it in a 3D space. Let's also imagine an electronic transition for this molecule. I know how an electronic transition works, how to value if it is possible (using the ...
2
votes
1answer
219 views

Do the states forming an orthonormal basis have the same amount of entanglement?

If $\{|\psi_{i}\rangle\}$ is an orthonormal basis for a bipartite system, will $E(|\psi_i\rangle) = E(|\psi_j\rangle)$ for all $i, j$, where $E$ is some entanglement measure?
7
votes
3answers
836 views

Pauli principle for particles very far apart from each other

Can two electrons be in the same state, when they belong to two different atoms, which are "far enough" (whatever that means) apart from each other? With "same state" I mean that (as far as ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

What is the speed of push/waves?

When we push something it moves due to the disturbance in it's molecular arrangement causing waves. How do I calculate the speed of push/waves? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dnv-Pm4ehFs The push ...
0
votes
2answers
123 views

Reconciliation of a particle's rest frame and the uncertainty principle

When calculating in a rest frame, doesn't one assume both, definite velocity (zero) and position (origin)? Why is Heisenberg okay with that? Edit: E.g. For a decay we can do calculations in which we ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Performance of a thermos bottle relative to contents

I'm not a physicist but I majored it at high school (a long time ago) and I study university math. Me and my roommate discussed whether the performance of a Thermos bottle is influenced by how full ...
4
votes
3answers
5k views

Effective Refractive Index

Can some one please explain in simple words that what is effective refractive index? How it is different from the refractive index? And how we can calculate the effective refractive index?
-1
votes
1answer
261 views

Mass - Gravitational pull - centrifugal force

In relation to mass/gravitational/centrifugal force. Is the increased gravitational force due to the increase in mass of a planet (i.e. earth) from meteorites, etc.. directly proportional to the ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

Astronomical measurements and data

For the sub-nuclear physics there is a database of the Particle Data Group, I was wondering if there was a similar on-line collection for astrophysics, such as energy absorption and emission spectra ...
10
votes
3answers
1k views

Equation of motion of a photon in a given metric

I have this metric: $$ds^2=-dt^2+e^tdx^2$$ and I want to find the equation of motion (of x). for that i thought I have two options: using E.L. with the Lagrangian: $L=-\dot t ^2+e^t\dot x ^2 $. ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

How can I put a permanent current into a superconducting loop?

I know that you can use induction to create a current in a superconducting loop, but this only works as long as the coil that induces the field has a current flowing through it. And obviously, this ...
3
votes
1answer
260 views

Who aobserves length contraction?

I have a homework in our nuclear physics class. The question is "An astronaut whose height in the earth is exactly 6ft is lying parallel to the axis of a spacecraft moving at a 0.9C relative to the ...
0
votes
3answers
173 views

Clarity in Electric field Definition?

The electric field at a point is defined as q/$r^2$. How does this definition take the nature of source and test charge into consideration. If I bring any positive/negative charge around the source ...
0
votes
0answers
97 views

antiferromagnetic spin wave

I have a hamiltonian that is derived from a spin wave energy dispersion calculation for a nearest neighbor interacting cubic antiferromagnet. After a Holstein-Primakoff transformation and making a ...
1
vote
1answer
103 views

Is it possible to accelerate a mass indefinitely using gravitational field?

As a particle's velocity increases, its mass increases(gamma times). Therefore, if a particle is in a gravitational field, the gravitational force it experiences must also increase(gamma times). The ...
1
vote
1answer
658 views

Gravitational field strength and Horizon in Rindler coordinates

I came across the following statements in 't Hooft's black holes notes, but not being able to justify them. The metric in the Rindler coordinates $x=\tilde{x}, y=\tilde{y}, z= \rho \cosh{\tau}, t= \...
2
votes
1answer
168 views

Clarification on the Seebeck Effect

Alright, I've been interested in the Seebeck effect lately, so I've been trying to learn it. From what I understand, this is measured with the Seebeck Coefficient, which gives you the $\mu\textrm{V}$ (...
1
vote
0answers
153 views

Please correct my understanding of Clausius-Clapeyron and latent heat

As I work a problem set, I'm being asked to calculate the latent heat associated with a particular phase transition of $NH_3$ (solid -> liquid, liquid -> gas, solid -> gas). I'm being told to perform ...
2
votes
0answers
61 views

Spin Transition Energies

I am reading a paper: http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1305/1305.2445.pdf On p. 22, the following Hamiltonian is given: $$ H = \mu_B g \mathbf{B} \cdot \mathbf{S} + D(S_Z^2+\frac{1}{3}S(S+1)) + E(...

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