2
votes
0answers
46 views

Limits on stable charged particles

Are there generic model-independent limits on massive stable charged particles (say 10-500GeV)? I mean SU(2)/color singlets with just a hypercharge. For example the LEP search (CERN-EP/99-075) was ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

What happens when a ball stops bouncing?

If I were to drop a bouncy ball onto a surface, each successive bounce will be lower in height as energy is dissipated. Eventually, however, the ball will cease to bounce and will remain in contact ...
7
votes
0answers
183 views

What really are exotic supersymmetric black holes?

I have just read (in the black holes chapter 14 on p244 of this book Ref.1) that in string theory, when one adds an (electric?) charge $Q$ to a static black hole, one can arrive at an exotic ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Why we call the ground state of Kitaev model a Spin Liquid?

Now we always talk about the so-called Kitaev spin liquid. One important property of spin liquid is global spin rotation symmetry. Let $\Psi$ represents a spin ground state, if $\Psi$ has global spin ...
1
vote
1answer
224 views

Fitting a circuit scheme to a simpler model

I have to simulate the electric field within a gas filled discharge gap generated by a radio frequency voltage generator. The circuit, provided to me by the experimenters somewhat far away, is given ...
1
vote
1answer
185 views

Type I' String theory as M-theory compactified on a line segment?

I was considering the S-dual of the Type I' String theory (the solitonic Type I string theory). That is the same as the S-dual of the T-Dual of Type I String theory. Then, that means both length ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

Huge buildings affect Earth's rotation?

Does constructing huge buildings affect the rotation of the Earth, similar to skater whose angular rotation increases when her arms are closed comparatively than open?
2
votes
1answer
3k views

If time stops at the speed of light is a photon 'everywhere' at once? [duplicate]

I am not a physicist so excuse my question if it's paticularly stupid. As a particle gets closer to the speed of light time slows down as for that particle as compared to a reference from the ...
3
votes
1answer
238 views

Diagonalizing/eigenvalues of the infinite dimensional matrix of N harmonic oscillators on a ring

I have trying to show that the continuum limit of N quantum harmonic oscillators gives rise the the klein-gordon field. However, instead of a usual finite string, I want to do it on a ring. Hence, my ...
-1
votes
1answer
319 views

Question on friction [closed]

Please look at the figure carefully. The question is written, and one has to match the two columns 1 and 2 given under "choices and explanation". Please tell me if I am really wrong, i.e. would you ...
3
votes
2answers
7k views

Why is a degree Celsius exactly the same as a Kelvin?

How on earth is it possible that the difference between two temperatures in Celsius and Kelvin is exactly the same. Given the historical definition of Celsius, I find it hard to believe that this is ...
2
votes
1answer
267 views

How (why!?) does one introduce an UV cut-off in dimensional regularization?

This question is in reference to the confusing equation 3.7 (page 14) of this paper. One sees the 1-loop answers in their theory as given in their A.7 and A.8 on page 20. Each of the terms is a ...
2
votes
2answers
242 views

Was TP Singh right to say that a theory of quantum gravity necessitates the Copenhagen Interpretation?

http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/174/1/012024 In the above link we see TP Singh arguing that only Copenhagen will work for a theory of quantum gravity. Some of his key points are "quantum theory ...
6
votes
0answers
158 views

Quantization as a functor [duplicate]

Can anyone give an mathematical elaboration of the following statement: Quantization is a functor carrying the category of Hilbert space and linear maps to that of Symplectic manifolds satisfying ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

How to draw a ray diagram from focal length, object and image heights?

Q. An object of height 8 cm is placed in front of a lens. It's inverted image of height 4.8 cm is formed on the screen. If the focal length of the lens is 12 cm then by drawing at scale calculate the ...
5
votes
1answer
213 views

Quantum master equation in the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism

I am reading the Section 15.9 of Weinberg's book "The Quantum Theory of Fields, vol. 2". Under a shift $\delta\Psi[\chi]$ in $\Psi[\chi]$, we have $$ \begin{split} \delta ...
5
votes
2answers
456 views

Why do single particle states furnish a rep. of the inhomogeneous Lorentz group?

Following up on this question: Weinberg says In general, it may be possible by using suitable linear combinations of the $\psi_{p,\sigma}$ to choose the $\sigma$ labels in such a way that ...
1
vote
1answer
261 views

Physical Interpretation of Lorentz-transformed Single Particle states being linear

As in this question, let $\psi_{p,\sigma}$ be a single-particle 4-momentum eigenstate, with $\sigma$ being a discrete label of other degrees of freedom. Weinberg discusses the effect of a homogenous ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

Why are non-momentum DoFs of single-particle states discretely labeled?

Following the treatment of Weinberg, chapter 2, we consider $\psi_{p,\sigma}$ as single-particle eigenstates of the 4-momentum. Weinberg says that $\sigma$ labels all other degrees of freedom and we ...
8
votes
1answer
122 views

What is energy in $z \neq 1 $ theories?

In a critical theory with dynamical critical exponent $z \neq 1 $, which amongst frequency, $\omega$, and dispersion, $E(\vec{k})$, may be referred to as ''energy''? I'm confused about this since in ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

Is there a term for the argument of the sine function outside of geometry?

Are there similar terms in other areas for the idea the "angle" conveys in geometry? I find that functions for abstract things such as pressure, electrical currents (nothing geometric there) on AC ...
1
vote
1answer
719 views

How far to the 'edge' of the galaxy?

Wikipedia lists the average thickness of the milky-way to be about 1,000 LY - but where (roughly) within that is the sun currently? In asking this, I'm fully aware that there's no well-defined edge - ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Why are the magnetic moment and the angular moment related?

Why are the magnetic moment and the angular moment related? I've always read everywhere that they are related but found nowhere a satisfactory explanation of the cause
6
votes
1answer
760 views

What goes wrong when one tries to quantize a scalar field with Fermi statistics?

At the end of section 9 on page 49 of Dirac's 1966 "Lectures on Quantum Field Theory" he says that if we quantize a real scalar field according to Fermi statistics [i.e., if we impose Canonical ...
8
votes
2answers
45k views

Conceptually, what is negative work?

I'm having some trouble understanding the concept of negative work. For example, my book says that if I lower a box to the ground, the box does positive work on my hands and my hands do negative work ...
26
votes
4answers
7k views

Why do prisms work (why is refraction frequency dependent)?

It is well known that a prism can "split light" by separating different frequencies of light: Many sources state that the reason this happens is that the index of refraction is different for ...
3
votes
1answer
107 views

Can convection cells evolve in stably stratified fluid?

Assume stably stratified fluid but not in equilibrium, e.g. with non-constant temperature gradient for example. Can convection cells be present? Typical example of convection cells is Rayleigh–Bénard ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

How to calculate air resistance of penny dropped from Empire State Building?

If a penny is dropped from the Empire State Building, then its speed, without taking air resistance into consideration, is $\sqrt{\left(32\frac{\textrm{ft}}{\textrm{s}^2}\right)(1454\textrm{ ...
7
votes
2answers
7k views

Does a lightning rod prevent lightning strikes?

I was always under the impression that a Lightning rod worked to protect a building by being the tallest part of the building and having a low path of resistance to the ground, thus being a good ...
5
votes
1answer
167 views

Explicit form of $\gamma^\mu \partial_\mu$ in the Dirac equation

I'm in an introductory particle physics class, and in performing manipulations on the Dirac equation, my instructor expands the $\gamma^\mu \partial_\mu$ term as: $$\gamma^\mu \partial_\mu = \gamma^0 ...
1
vote
1answer
253 views

Anti-particle problem for Dirac sea

According to the Dirac hole theory we know that Dirac sea is completely filled with negative energy, called vacuum. We will need $2mc^2$ or greater to get electron and a positron by incident photon. ...
14
votes
3answers
1k views

Meaning of inner product $\langle \vec{r} | \psi(t)\rangle $

I have come across the equation which comes out of the nothing in Zettili's book Quantum mechanics concepts and applications p. 167: $$\psi(\vec{r},t) ~=~ \langle \vec{r} \,|\, \psi(t) \rangle.$$ ...
12
votes
1answer
1k views

Unitary quantum field theory

What do physicists mean when they refer to a quantum field theory being unitary? Does this mean that all the symmetry groups of the theory act via unitary representations? I would appreciate if one ...
0
votes
1answer
336 views

What is the wave length of the entire universe?

In quantum physics, particles are also waves. Larger particles have shorter wave lengths, and macroscopic objects have extremely short wave lengths so that the wave aspect can be ignored, and ...
5
votes
3answers
664 views

How can particles travel in a straight line?

A particle can be set off in a certain direction by giving them momentum. Momentum is a vector, so the particle heads off in a specific direction. But the wave function of the particle allows it to ...
15
votes
3answers
3k views

Origin of Ladder Operator methods

Ladder operators are found in various contexts (such as calculating the spectra of the harmonic oscillator and angular momentum) in almost all introductory Quantum Mechanics textbooks. And every book ...
2
votes
3answers
570 views

Magnetic B Field of Point Charge Not at Constant Velocity

I'm working on an N-body simulator for charged particles. I know that moving charged particles generate a magnetic field, and another moving charged particle could be effected by this magnetic field. ...
15
votes
1answer
564 views

Does the existence of Higgs imply the existence of Magnetic Monopoles?

I am aware that in theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking, Magnetic Monopoles can exist as topological solitons. Can the same be done with the Standard Model gauge group. I am familiar with the ...
1
vote
2answers
183 views

Expectation value - Zetilli vs Griffith

I know that an inner product between two vectors is defined like: $$\langle a | b\rangle = {a_1}^\dagger b_1+{a_2}^\dagger b_2+\dots$$ but because a transpose of a component for example $a_1$ is ...
-6
votes
3answers
341 views

Does one second exist? [closed]

Let us assume .5 second has passed. Now similarly let .9 seconds also passed.. Then let's say that .99 second has passed...we're still not done because 1 second hasn't passed. Then follows .999 ...
11
votes
1answer
528 views

What is the reason why anyons escape spin-statistic theorem?

I'm wondering about the exact reason why anyons escape the spin-statistic theorem (SST), see e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spin–statistics_theorem. I've read somewhere (the wikipedia page is ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

How much negative charge do I accumulate by touching the earth?

The Earth carries a negative electric charge of roughly 500 thousand Coulombs (according to different sources I've seen). If I touch the Earth I should therefore pick up some of this electric charge ...
11
votes
3answers
546 views

What's wrong with this application of Thomas Precession to circular motion velocity measurements?

If you happen to have the Third Edition of Classical Electrodynamics by John David Jackson, turn to section 11.8, as that's where I'm getting all this from. If not, you should still be able to follow ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

If $SU(2)_{L} \times U(1)_{Y}$ breaks to $U(1)_{em}$ when a non-zero mass for the Higgs boson is chosen, why do we still have weak interactions?

As I understand it, when we say that the $SU(2)_{L} \times U(1)_{Y}$ is broken via the Higgs mechanism, this is because the symmetry acts on the Higgs mass in a way that would change it's value. If we ...
3
votes
1answer
139 views

Observables - what are they?

I often read in books that an observable is represented by an Hermitean operator. But it is deceiving as operator isn't the observable. As far as I've read the observable is denoted like $\langle ...
3
votes
0answers
111 views

Evolution of black holes ensemble

Background: I’ve read many times that arrow of time can be explained from extremely low entropy of the Universe at the Big Bang (http://preposterousuniverse.com/eternitytohere/faq.html). The argument ...
5
votes
1answer
258 views

Ricci tensor of the orthogonal space

While reading this article I got stuck with Eq.$(54)$. I've been trying to derive it but I can't get their result. I believe my problem is in understanding their hints. They say that they get the ...
-1
votes
4answers
251 views

Short-duration forces

In circular motion, it is said that the centripetal force acts only for a very very short period of time, hence is able to only change the direction but not magnitude of the velocity. Similarly in a ...
17
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the difference between scale invariance and self-similarity?

I always thought that these two terms are some kind of synonyms, meaning that if you have a self-similar or scale invariant system, you can zoom in or out as you like and you will always see the same ...
1
vote
2answers
430 views

Wigner characteristic function

I came across the "representation of a Gaussian state by its Wigner characteristic function". I don't know what Wigner characteristic function is and google results are not precise enough. Neither ...

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