The product of the force on an object and the displacement the object undergoes along the direction of the force.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
3answers
16 views

Dealing with negative work

Dumb question, I'm working with vector fields right now, and one question on here tells me to assume an object can take on three paths from a to b. (paths not listed here) for times in [0,1] Now ...
-1
votes
0answers
23 views

work and energy with air rifle [on hold]

A $4 \text{ g}$ air-rifle pellet is fired into a target block attached to a glider. The total mass of the block and glider is $0.5 \text{ kg}$. The target slides along the track $1.455 \text{ m}$. The ...
1
vote
4answers
49 views

The amount of potential energy at the height of h [duplicate]

When we lift an object upwards with a constant velocity for a distance of $ h $ the work that we've done is $mgh$ and the work done by the force of gravity is $-mgh$. So the net work on the object is ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Rigid body: internal work null?

I am following an elementary physics course book, namely W.E. Gettys, F.J. Keller and M.J. Skove's Physics (in an Italian translation). In exercises where no non-conservative force acts on a rigid ...
1
vote
1answer
123 views

Potential Energy of Springs and Gravity, and Work of a force

I am currently really stuck on this problem and I am not sure how to actually solve it, I think I can reason it out logically but I do not know how to show it. Here it is and under I will show what I ...
2
votes
2answers
45 views

Work done by frictional force on a sliding block

A block slides across a table horizontally with an initial velocity $V$. The frictional force $F$ brings it to rest after its Centre of Mass covers distance $S$. What is the work done by the ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Finding maximum speed in a work-energy problem [closed]

I have the following problem: The Royal Gorge bridge over the Arkansas River is $310\text{ m}$ above the river. A $57\text{ kg}$ bungee jumper has an elastic cord with an unstressed length of ...
1
vote
3answers
67 views

Work-Energy conservation with friction

I didn't go to the lesson of work-energy theorem, so I miss something about this subject. I know the formulas, but I can't figure it out. This question has many quantities. Here is the problem, ...
4
votes
5answers
2k views

Is there work being done if no displacement occurs?

So the definition of work is $W = \vec{F}\cdot\vec{s}$. Say I have a point mass which is being pushed on both sides by equal forces and therefore does not move. Does this mean that no work is being ...
1
vote
1answer
22 views

Deriving the equation for the speed of a block down an incline using work - keep getting the wrong constant

So the question is: There is a block of mass $m$ travelling along an incline that makes an angle $\theta$ with the horizontal. If the block is pushed up the incline with an initial velocity $v_o$, ...
0
votes
2answers
526 views

How to calculate work when a block is moving with constant velocity?

How to calculate work when a block is moving with constant velocity? As we know $f=ma$, and for constant velocity $a=0$, so $f=0$ and $w=fs=0$? Can anybody make it clear?
0
votes
3answers
37 views

When moving from one position to another at a constant velocity, how does the conservation of energy hold?

I know that this might be a duplicate question, but I have not found any satisfactory answers that clear up my lack of understanding. Here is my question. Say a sloth hangs on a tree in the middle of ...
2
votes
2answers
13k views

What is the relationship between Force and Kinetic Energy?

I am an Middle-School (Grade 8) student, who is self-learning classical mechanics. I saw this equation from Classical Mechanics: $\vec F=m \vec a$, the following equation is pretty straight forward ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Normal force, work and conservativity

I have searched very much on line, both in this site and elsewhere, but found no proof of whether the normal force is conservative or is not, in general. Clearly, if the force is orthogonal to the ...
0
votes
3answers
49 views

How much work do I need to convert 300ml of water from 25°C to 3°C? [closed]

A question on how to apply thermodynamics principles to figure out how much work is needed to hold 300ml water in room temperature at 3°C. So far I have: 1Cal for each degree per g of water. We have ...
2
votes
2answers
66 views

Lack of rigour in usual derivation of Work-Energy Theorem

The derivation of the Work-Energy theorem usually goes as follows: You define the work done on a particle under net force $\vec{F}$ as $$W=\int\limits_C \vec{F}\cdot\mathrm{d}\vec{r}$$ And then you ...
0
votes
3answers
36 views

Work and energy

when a ball of mass m is brought with uniform velocity from infinity into the g field of the earth at a distance r from it, the potential energy of the ball earth system decreases from 0 to -GMm/r. ...
3
votes
3answers
18k views

Why work is a scalar and not a vector?

Work (in physics) is a scalar, but why? And why not a vector?
0
votes
2answers
98 views

Work and Free Body Diagrams

I am a bit confused with how to find work when there is a free body diagram. I am trying to work out this problem, and in it a box is being pulled at a constant speed by a rope at a constant angle ...
2
votes
5answers
201 views

How can static friction do work?

By definition, the work done by a force is $W = F\cdot d$, so how can static friction do work? Can this force move the body a distance of $75~\text{m}$?
2
votes
1answer
147 views

How did Feynman prove that energy cannot be extracted from electric field?

In the Feynman Lectures, vol. II, chapter 4, Feynman discusses electric potential and says: If we carry a charge from point $a \to b$, $$W = -\int_{a}^{b} \mathbf{F} \cdot ds.$$ Now, in general, ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Help calculating work done by stretching a wire [closed]

A wire of length 0.89 m and cross-sectional area 1.7 cm2 is stretched elastically by an amount 1.2 cm. By Hooke’s law, the restoring force is $−k\Delta L$. Calculate the work done in ...
0
votes
2answers
160 views

Is work done in rolling friction?

I am confused by rolling friction. Suppose you have a cylinder rolling which starts at rest at the top of an incline plane and begins to roll down the plane without slipping. Is work done by the ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Work done by friction on car

David Morin, in "Introduction to Classical Mechanics" says that friction does not exert a force on a car because the ground is fixed but that KE of the car is changing to internal kinetic energy in ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Constant 2 in kinetic energy equation [duplicate]

Trying to understand where the constant 2 comes from in the kinetic energy equation, $mv^2/2$. Why 2 and not another number?
2
votes
5answers
269 views

when an object is lifted (at a constant velocity) shouldn't the work done on the object be zero? [duplicate]

When I lift an object from the ground (at a constant velocity) I'm applying force on the object equal to its weight and the earth is also pulling it downwards with equal amounts of force. So if the ...
2
votes
4answers
116 views

If velocity is constant, how can $p = F\cdot v$ be non zero?

If an airplane of mass $m$ is flying at a constant speed $v$, the power of the airplane is $$P = m\cdot v\cdot g $$ where $g$ is the acceleration of gravity and therefore: $$ F = m\cdot g, $$ but, ...
1
vote
2answers
48 views

Why am I getting that work it's always the same in both directions?

I'm studying electrostatic and I'm getting pretty frustrated because with the definition of work I'm getting that it's always positive and it doesn't make any sense. So here I have 2 positive ...
4
votes
1answer
51 views

Relativity of Work

Let's say there is a man pushing a wall with a force of $-1 \text N$, and moving it $0 \text m$. Since $W = F \cdot d$, he has done $0\text J$ of work on the wall. Another man is pushing a duck with ...
0
votes
2answers
223 views

Why does the coefficient of performance need to be calculated with $W + Q$?

How much work must a heat pump with a COP of 2.50 do in order to extract 1.00 MJ of thermal energy from the outdoors (the cold reservoir)? The first formula that came into my mind after reading ...
6
votes
3answers
634 views

Why should Conservative forces have their curl equal to zero?(intuition)

There are several conditions that must be met in order for a force to be conservative. One of them is that the curl of that force must be equal to zero? What is the physical intuition behind this? If ...
1
vote
6answers
6k views

Workdone in an equipotential surface is zero?

An equipotential surface is one in which all the points are at the same electric potential. If a charge is to be moved between any two points (say from point A to point B) on an equipotential surface, ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

The concept of displacement in definition of work

Suppose an ideal spring is attached to a wall at one of its end. Let an external force act on the spring at another end to stretch the spring to distance $x$. If spring constant is $k$ then work done ...
0
votes
2answers
114 views

Why is the potential energy for a body raised up by a height negative?

I tried deriving the potential energy of a body when raised at a height $h$ above the earths surface, using the formula: $$PE = -W_\text{conservative}$$ where $W_\text{conservative}$ is the work ...
0
votes
2answers
201 views

Force vs. impulse: what is the math description of their interaction?

In this image there are two forces acting on the same body, and we can decribe them mathematically and geometrically using vectors and the palallelogram rule. NOw, suppose the box (stone, ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

When to use h = Cp∆T or u = Cv∆T

I'm getting myself confused on when to use h = cp∆T or u = cv∆T where cp is the specific ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Work needed to pump the balloons

Let's suppose that we want to pump the balloons underwater from the initial volume $V_0$ to the volume $V_1$. The pressure there equals $p_1$ and the atmospheric pressure is $p_0$. It is claimed ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

How much power does it take to keep a massive particle suspended in a gravitational field?

For instance if I have a rocket of mass $m$ in a uniform gravitational field $g$, and I want to keep it floating in the air via thrust alone, then how much power in the form of (say) chemical energy ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Use Work-KE Theorem? [closed]

I've been trying so long at this problem to no avail. I drew my free body diagram, but I'm unsure which formula to use. Could someone help me out?
0
votes
0answers
22 views

How is the Joule normalised?

Apologies if this question is a duplicate, I tried searching for this question both on Google and here, but was unable to find an answer. A Joule is defined in various ways, some of them being: ...
2
votes
2answers
164 views

How can a magnetic field accelerate particles if it cannot do work?

A varying magnetic field can accelerate charge particles, but it is said that a magnetic field can't do any work so it should not be able to speed up charged particles, right? How is this apparent ...
0
votes
2answers
55 views

How this formula for work follows from the definition?

If a particle moves along a path $\gamma : I\subset \mathbb{R}\to \mathbb{R}^3$ then the work done by a force $\mathbf{F}$ is defined by $$W = \int_{\gamma} \mathbf{F} = ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Does the line integral definition of Work involve distance or displacement?

My textbook reports the following definition of Work: where ds is the infinitesimal displacement. I know that an infinitesimal displacement is usually denoted by dr and I also know that the ...
4
votes
6answers
170 views

Does a magnetic field do work on a moving rod?

In a case such as this one, my textbook says that I might be tempted to think the magnetic force is doing work (against the moving rod). It then says this isnt the case because "charges move ...
0
votes
2answers
77 views

If an object rests on a table, not accelerating, how much work do both the object and the table do?

Obviously, the net work done is zero, because there's no motion, but is the proper way to look at it that both the object's gravity and the table's normal force do zero work, or that one does positive ...
2
votes
2answers
69 views

Where does this formula for sagging of a beam come from?

In one of my physics textbooks there is a chapter on the elasticity of materials which contains pretty basic outline about Young's modulus, stress-strain, elastic potential energy and related stuff. ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Integral limits when calculating the work

If I integrate $$dW= \vec{ F} \cdot d\vec{\ell}$$ which are the limits? In $$\int\limits_{W_{inf}}^{W_{sup}}dW= \int\limits_{\vec{\ell}_{1}}^{\vec{\ell}_{2}} \vec{ F} \cdot d\vec{\ell}$$ it is ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Which is the right sign convention for the potential difference?

The circulation of the electric field gives the potential difference, but is it : $$V_B-V_A = \int_A^B\vec{E}.\vec{dOM} \hspace{1.5cm} (1)$$ or $$V_B-V_A = - \int_A^B\vec{E}.\vec{dOM} \hspace{1cm} ...
0
votes
3answers
50 views

How work theoretically is zero, when person did do work while covering a distance then returning it?

$W = Fd$, meaning if a body moved a distance, say $3 m$, and returns, its distance will be zero and work will be zero. I do understand it mathematically and graphically but can someone explain it to ...
3
votes
2answers
306 views

Validity of work-energy theorem in presence of non-conservative forces?

How can the work-energy theorem be valid in presence of non-conservative forces since conservation of energy is not there?