The product of the force on an object and the displacement the object undergoes along the direction of the force.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
4answers
505 views

How do you tell what forces do no work?

The total mass of the children and the toboggan is 66 kg. The force the parent exerts is 58 N (18 degrees above the horizontal). What 3 forces/ components do no work on the toboggan? I said the ...
0
votes
2answers
655 views

About the work done by gravity to pull the object down to the earth surface

The following question is from an physics exercise and I know the answer and the way to solve the problem but just curious why my own way doesn't work. The question is asking "A 2500kg space vehicle, ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Work done by friction

Suppose we have a block of mass $M$ and we are moving it up a curve, very slowly ($a=0$). The surface is not smooth, and coefficient of friction is $\mu=\mu_s=\mu_k$. To move the block we apply a ...
3
votes
1answer
200 views

Intuition behind Work

I have a doubt in understanding the intuition behind the concept of work. First of all, I think this isn't duplicate, I've searched on the site, and the closest thing I've found was this post which is ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

How to understand the work-energy theorem?

How to understand the work-energy theorem? I took a short lecture on physics for engineering last week. The lecturer emphasized that the work done on an object will cause the kinetic energy change as ...
0
votes
1answer
157 views

Why work to change velocity from 0 to 20 km/h is less then from 20 to 40? [duplicate]

Imagine spaceship in vacuum with mass = 1. At beginning, it has velocity 0, and kinetic energy 0. $$W_1 = 0$$ Then, it turns on its engine, and changes velocity from 0 to 20 (delta v = 20). It's ...
1
vote
1answer
550 views

Work as an integral of mass over velocity?

As I've understood it, the area under $F$-$s$-graph is the work done, so then :$$W(s)=\int{F(s)ds}$$ I am also given this equation ($W_k$ is kinetic energy, which is equal the work done to set the ...
1
vote
3answers
762 views

Integration by parts to derive relativistic kinetic energy

I have come across a weird integration during derivation of relativistic kinetic energy. Our professor states that i can get RHS out of LHS using integration by parts: $$ \int\limits_0^x \! ...
1
vote
0answers
92 views

How to solve state parameters using these givens for an ideal gas?

In a thermodynamic turbine using air as an ideal gas, given that you have a known inlet temperature value $T_i$, a known exit pressure value $P_e$, a known inlet and exit velocity $V_i$ and $V_e$, a ...
0
votes
2answers
919 views

Finding maximum speed in a work-energy problem

I have the following problem: The Royal Gorge bridge over the Arkansas River is $310\text{ m}$ above the river. A $57\text{ kg}$ bungee jumper has an elastic cord with an unstressed length of ...
7
votes
3answers
876 views

Energy equation for an open system

I teach undergraduate thermodynamics and I was quite ashamed that I couldn't explain to a student, the following. I thought I'd bring it to physics.SE in hope of providing my student a good ...
1
vote
0answers
83 views

Problem in average height

Let, diameter of cylinder hole of height 30m and diameter 2m filled with water. In a book, when author tried to find out the power for lifting all of the water then he used average height. why is ...
3
votes
2answers
324 views

Find work done by force along a path - is parameterization the only way?

$F = x^3y^4 \hat i + x^4y^3 \hat j$ from $(0,0)$ to $(1,1)$. I am given different paths. For example, "first along x axis and then along the y axis" is one of the paths. Is this problem solvable ...
4
votes
3answers
181 views

When can one write $a=v \cdot dv/dx$?

Referring to unidimensional motion, it is obvious that it doesn't always make sense to write the speed as a function of position. Seems to me that this is a necessary condition to derive formulas ...
4
votes
2answers
146 views

Conservative Force and $1/r^2$

Does the inverse square law have anything to do with conservative behavior of the central forces?
1
vote
2answers
179 views

How can I understand work conceptually?

I'm in a mechanical physics class, and I'm having a hard time understanding what the quantity of work represents. How can I understand it conceptually?
1
vote
2answers
864 views

Work done in projectile motion

A projectile is shot at some inclination to the ground. It falls at another point having R distance from the initial point on the ground. Is there any work done? If initial velocity vector is $(u\cos ...
3
votes
4answers
969 views

Paradox- Object thrown parallel to the ground will never fall down

Suppose an object is thrown parallel to the ground. The gravity acts downward (ie. perpendicular to the direction of motion of the object). The work done by gravity on that object will be given by : ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

What is $vdp$ work and when do I use it?

I am a little confused, from the first law of thermodynamics (energy conservation) $$\Delta E = \delta Q - \delta W $$ If the amount of work done is a volume expansion of a gas in, say a piston ...
0
votes
2answers
299 views

Measuring work done by gravity over non-constant gravitational acceleration

A question from an example from a MIT Classical Mechanics Lecture on Work. Here's the given definition for gravitational potential energy (~32:00): "The ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Is the normal force a conservative force?

Most of the time the normal force doesn't do any work because it's perpendicular to the direction of motion but if it does do work, would it be conservative or non-conservative? For example, consider ...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

Work done by the air resistance [closed]

A ball of mass 0.37 kg is thrown upward along the vertical with a initial speed of 14 m / s, and reaches a maximum height of 8.4 m. a) What is the work done by air resistance on the ball? b) ...
1
vote
3answers
266 views

Can endergonic reactions occur outside of living organisms?

If the Gibbs free energy equation is defined as: ∆G = ∆H - T∆S And the amount of energy/work released from a reaction is: ...
0
votes
1answer
381 views

Is resistance to motion directly proportional to the speed of a moving object?

Power is known to be equal to the force x velocity (P=FV). Im solving a question that states the following : Car with engine working at 32 kW, mass of 1 tonne, travels at a constant speed of 40m/s ...
2
votes
1answer
111 views

Conservative forces intuition

Take a gravitational field (with all the field lines pointing inwards) and a perfectly circular curve as an object's trajectory. To find the work exerted by the force on the object, compute the line ...
1
vote
2answers
576 views

Mechanics Question: Energy, Work and Power

I'm a pure mathematician by trade, and have been trying to teach myself A-level mechanics. (This is not homework, it is purely self-study.) I've been working through the exercises and have come up ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Is energy the ability to do work?

Here was my argument against this, the second law of thermodynamics, in effect says that, there is no heat engine that can take all of some energy that was transferred to it by heat and do work on ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

What is the difference of work $W$ and thermal energy $Q$ in thermodynamic Stirling-process for ideal gas?

What is the difference of work $W$ and thermal energy $Q$ in thermodynamic Stirling-process (in simple form) for ideal gas? I think that you need work to preserve this process and you bring thermal ...
2
votes
5answers
716 views

Is there a mathematical derivation of potential energy that is *not* rooted in the conservation of energy?

For simplicity I'll consider only gravity, but in general this question only applies to conservative forces. As per my understanding, the way one gets to the equation for gravitational potential ...
8
votes
3answers
701 views

Intuitively Understanding Work and Energy

It is easy to understand the concepts of momentum and impulse. The formula $mv$ is simple, and easy to reason about. It has an obvious symmetry to it. The same cannot be said for kinetic energy, ...
1
vote
3answers
184 views

Mechanics Problem

I'm trying to follow Feynman's lecture. Unfortunately I'm a bit stuck on a small piece, so if you could show me what I'm doing wrong then I'd greatly appreciate your help. I want to exactly know how ...
2
votes
1answer
193 views

Understanding Work and the conservation of energy

We have a car with a mass of $780 kg$ with travels with a speed of $50 km/h$. The car brakes and after $4,2m$ is stops completely. Warmth is created. Calculate the friction. I solved this easily, by ...
3
votes
1answer
994 views

Area under a $pV$ diagram

What does the area under a Pressure volume diagram equal? I read in my textbook it equals 'external' work done, but why is this? First of all, what exactly is external work? Can you get it ...
2
votes
1answer
198 views

Moving along friction surfaces

If a particle moves along a one dimensional surface with constant friction. As the particle moves from point $A$ to point $B$ it loses an amount of energy equals $E(A,B)$. Consider that the particle ...
1
vote
2answers
908 views

Calculating force required to stop bungee jumper

Given that: bungee jumper weighs 700N jumps off from a height of 36m needs to stop safely at 32m (4m above ground) unstretched length of bungee cord is 25m Whats the force required to stop the ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

Needed Energy For Lifting 200 kg weight

I'd like to learn how much energy I need to lift a 200 kilograms weight on normal earth conditions? For example how much electric power do we need? I'm not a physicist and not a student and this ...
-1
votes
3answers
1k views

A chain 64 meters long whose mass is 20 kilograms is hanging [closed]

A chain 64 meters long whose mass is 20 kilograms is hanging over the edge of a tall building and does not touch the ground. How much work is required to lift the top 3 meters of the chain to the top ...
1
vote
1answer
540 views

ratio between work and heat [closed]

I am really stuck on a problem in my textbook: Water is heated in an open pan where the air pressure is one atmosphere. The water remains a liquid, which expands by a small amount as it is heated. ...
1
vote
3answers
7k views

Thermodynamics - Sign convention

I use the sign convention: Heat absorbed by the system = $q+$ (positive) Heat evolved by the system = $q-$ (negative) Work done on the system = $w +$ (positive) Work done by the system = $w -$ ...
1
vote
2answers
687 views

Why is work defined as force dot displacement?

Why is work defined as force dot displacement? I know that it is defined like that based on the observational fact - we do more work when we apply greater force or move to a greater distance. But I ...
0
votes
1answer
554 views

Energy used to stop / slow an object

I'm trying to workout how much energy (if any), I use (imagining me as an efficient machine rather than a complex bio-mechanical human) when I lower or catch a weight. I understand that when I push it ...
0
votes
1answer
5k views

How much work is needed to compress a certain volume of gas?

I want to know the formula (and what does the symbols stand for) for how much work is needed to compress a certain volume of gas?
0
votes
1answer
273 views

Power, Force Velocity

In any case, if the force and power is constant , does velocity also need to be constant? If no, can you tell me a case. Further can this be extended for non-rigid bodies.
5
votes
5answers
6k views

Why there is a 1/2 in kinetic energy formula? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is there a $\frac 1 2$ in $\frac 1 2 mv^2$? Hèllo, I have a question about kinetic energy formula. As you know, in kinetic energy formula, we have: ...
1
vote
0answers
86 views

How would a physicist move? [closed]

Let's assume that Johnny Physicist has decided to move from his poor dingy second story apartment, into his much deserved home. Without making modifications to the existing structures? What would be ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

How do I find work done by friction over a curve represented by a polynomial?

I am facing a problem in Physics. Problem: What will be the work done by the frictional force over a polynomial curve if a body is sliding on this polynomial($a+bx+cx^2+dx^3+\ldots$) curve from rest ...
1
vote
3answers
124 views

Carrying water on person, or on the frame when bicycling

So, the question is as follows: What is the difference in work exerted by the rider in the two following scenarios? a) Rider + bike. Water carried in a holder on the frame b) Rider + bike. Water ...
4
votes
2answers
676 views

I have a slight problem understanding the concept of “work”?

What I understand is that work is not the same as a car using gas or a crane lifting a car high up into the air. Let's use the crane as an example. And let me write out a few lines from the book. ...
4
votes
4answers
221 views

Why does it require such little energy to create the fastest thing in the universe?

I have noticed when I turn on the light switch in my house light comes from the bulb. How is this light created?(process occurring in the bulb) and why is this small amount of electricity enough to ...
3
votes
2answers
223 views

When work is performed solely by magnetism, is there an equivalent loss of energy from the magnetic field?

When two magnets are placed within appropriate proximity and released, the attractive force will perform work and bring them together. Work is performed overcoming friction. Can we measure a ...