The product of the force on an object and the displacement the object undergoes along the direction of the force.

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180 views

Is work is equal to $mv^2$ (without $\frac{1}{2}$)?

I was trying to come up with an equation for work that doesn't include time, because I don't know time. Here's what I did: $$ work = Fd = mad = m{v\over t}d = m{v\over\left({d\over v}\right)}d = ...
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2answers
816 views

Why do two equal-and-opposing forces each do work on a moving object but not on a stationary object?

Consider a point-mass $m$ having constant velocity but undergoing influence from two forces, $F_1$, $F_2$, having equal magnitude but opposite directions. Because the forces' magnitudes are equal, I ...
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3answers
4k views

Net work done on the body when we lift it and put it on the table is zero?

I'm little confused here. Work done on the body when we lift it and put it on the table is zero, because according to work energy theorem, change in kinetic energy of the body is zero. So, the net ...
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4answers
113 views

If velocity is constant, how can $p = F\cdot v$ be non zero?

If an airplane of mass $m$ is flying at a constant speed $v$, the power of the airplane is $$P = m\cdot v\cdot g $$ where $g$ is the acceleration of gravity and therefore: $$ F = m\cdot g, $$ but, ...
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2answers
65 views

Where does this formula for sagging of a beam come from?

In one of my physics textbooks there is a chapter on the elasticity of materials which contains pretty basic outline about Young's modulus, stress-strain, elastic potential energy and related stuff. ...
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2answers
74 views

What is the meaning of the negative sign in $W = -\Delta U$?

What is the meaning of the negative sign in $W = -\Delta U$ ? As far as I understand, $W = -\Delta U = -(U_f - U_i) = U_i - U_f$. While $U_i$ is the initial potential energy (before applying the ...
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1answer
90 views

The work-energy theorem

Well here's the question. From some previous excercises we know that from \begin{align} A&=\int F\;ds,\\ &=\int ma\;ds, &&(F=ma)\\ &=\int m \frac{dv}{dt}\;ds, ...
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274 views

Understanding relationship between work and energy

I've read over 10 books about work and energy, and I just simply can't understand it. First of all, they go ahead and randomly define that work is force times distance: $$W=F X \cos\theta$$ Okay, ...
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2answers
13k views

What is the relationship between Force and Kinetic Energy?

I am an Middle-School (Grade 8) student, who is self-learning classical mechanics. I saw this equation from Classical Mechanics: $\vec F=m \vec a$, the following equation is pretty straight forward ...
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2answers
1k views

Work done by isothermal expansion from two different viewpoints

Consider an adiabatic system as follows. It consists of a gas in a container and a piston. Initially, the system is at equilibrium and the gas inside it occupies a volume $V_i$ at a pressure $p_i$ ...
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2answers
247 views

Question related to work done and energy

Suppose you lift a box from the ground over your head. You will be using energy as there is work done. But when you keep the box lifted over your head, aren't you using any extra energy?
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427 views

Signs in proof of gravitation potential energy (GPE)

Proof of gravitational potential energy. Work done by gravity in bringing mass from infinity to a distance of $r$ between masses. When we use the integration formula and arrive at the answer we ...
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2answers
412 views

Does a different opposing force affect work?

Suppose a man exerts $10~N$ as he lifts a $1~kg$ box a distance of $2~m$ against Earth's gravity. To determine work we can use the following equation: $$ W = F \cdot d \\ W = (10~N) \cdot (2~m) = ...
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1answer
363 views

A dielectric table is being inserted between a plate capacitor and $\triangle U<0$ how to deduce the table is attracted to the plates?

I am practicing for an exam in my Physics $2$ course. One of a previews exam questions described a plate capacitor and asked to calculate the initial energy $U_{0}$, then a dielectric table was ...
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1answer
1k views

Thermodynamic cycles, when is the work negative/positive?

ever since I begun calculating thermodynamical cycles, I've had problems with determining the sign of the work along a particular bit of the cycle. Of course, I guess that an arbitrary cycle is ...
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1answer
259 views

Work done by gravity on Water

Now according to me we would see change in potential energy of system and equate it to the work done by gravity. But when we see this the first column lowers by $H/2$ and right one rises by $H/2$ ...
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1answer
129 views

Conservative forces intuition

Take a gravitational field (with all the field lines pointing inwards) and a perfectly circular curve as an object's trajectory. To find the work exerted by the force on the object, compute the line ...
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1answer
231 views

Understanding Work and the conservation of energy

We have a car with a mass of $780 kg$ with travels with a speed of $50 km/h$. The car brakes and after $4,2m$ is stops completely. Warmth is created. Calculate the friction. I solved this easily, by ...
2
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1answer
281 views

Moving along friction surfaces

If a particle moves along a one dimensional surface with constant friction. As the particle moves from point $A$ to point $B$ it loses an amount of energy equals $E(A,B)$. Consider that the particle ...
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3answers
1k views

How do I find work done by friction over a curve represented by a polynomial?

I am facing a problem in Physics. Problem: What will be the work done by the frictional force over a polynomial curve if a body is sliding on this polynomial($a+bx+cx^2+dx^3+\ldots$) curve from rest ...
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2answers
260 views

In continuum mechanics, what is work potential in the context of total potential energy?

I'm reading a book on the finite element method. Specifically I'm looking at the background material where they are discussing potential energy, equilibrium, and the Rayleigh–Ritz method. The book ...
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1answer
34 views

Does the line integral definition of Work involve distance or displacement?

My textbook reports the following definition of Work: where ds is the infinitesimal displacement. I know that an infinitesimal displacement is usually denoted by dr and I also know that the ...
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2answers
38 views

Work done in lifting chain with nonuniform linear density

I am teaching calculus, and a natural-seeming problem type just occured to me. It would go something like: a 2m chain hangs from the top of a building. Its density at a point h meters from the edge ...
2
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1answer
52 views

Another condition of calculating work

Let's imagine that there is a box placed at the corner of a table, and I push it so that my applied force makes an angle of 30° from the table's surface. The box would move and, due to the effect ...
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4answers
110 views

What is the intuition behind “Net Work is Zero”?

I tried searching the answer to this all over the internet, but still cannot grasp this concept. So, when a book is being lifted, let's say $25 meters$ with a mass of $4kg$, with constant speed. I ...
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1answer
57 views

Work due to air resistance

I was trying to find the distance a machine system I designed would potentially go. The machine works like this: A mass $M$ drops down and through a system of pulleys, pulls a wheel wound with the ...
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1answer
41 views

Minimum Power Required

Here is a question, I found two methods to solve it, differing in the answers and I'm not sure why a method is incorrect. Question: A fire hose of cross section area ...
2
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1answer
58 views

Work Done On a Body When It is Not in Contact with the agent of the Force

Is it necessary for work to be done on a body that the agent of the force remains in contact with the body? For example, if I hit a football with my foot with a small amount of force and it moves a ...
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2answers
514 views

Falling chain with friction

I really need some help with a physics problem, and I guess my doubt is more conceptual, than question based. But still, let me pose it to you: A uniform chain of mass $M$ and length $L$ lies on ...
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2answers
2k views

Does moving something horizontally in gravity do no work?

Bill’s job is to lift bags of flour and place them in the back of a truck, which is parked next to him. Sally is loading the same bags of flour into a similar truck that is located 10 m away. ...
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1answer
88 views

Separating the potential energy of a system of particles.

Assuming all forces derive form a conservative source and that all forces observe the strong form of the third law, how do we arrive at the following equation? \begin{equation} V=\sum _i V_i+\frac ...
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3answers
154 views

The effect of windspeed on a car

I've worked problems in the past in trig class concerning the effect of wind on the speed of a plane and it's flight path and was wondering if a similar thing occurs with a car. First off, I'm ...
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0answers
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Connection: Work on dipole <-> optical absorption

If I consider a two-level system with a ground and an excited state, I can compute the instantaneous rate at which work is being done on the dipole $\mu(t)$ by an electric field $E(t)$: $\dot{W} = ...
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2answers
458 views

Energy of electron spinning in a magnetic field

When an electron travels in circles in a uniform magnetic field, it must lose energy because all accelerated charges radiate, and must therefore spiral down to the center. Is this energy compensated ...
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2answers
82 views

How can I understand how $\text{m}^2/\text{s}^2$ is related to $\text{J}/\text{kg}$?

$E=mc^2$ is the famous equation that states the equivalence of mass and energy, with a conversion factor in units of $\text{m}^2/\text{s}^2$. But in my naive mind, the conversion factor of mass and ...
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2answers
92 views

What does $ {\bf F} = \frac{\mathrm{d}W}{\mathrm{d}{\bf x}}$ actually mean?

What does the formula $$ {\bf F} ~=~ \frac{\mathrm{d}W}{\mathrm{d}{\bf x}}$$ actually mean? Here $\mathrm{d}W$ is the work done in a small period, ${\bf F}$ is the force and $\mathrm{d}{\bf x}$ is a ...
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226 views

Does gravity exert more “power” when an object is traveling faster?

So, this question arose when I was pondering the meaning of horsepower and torque in cars. I thought of the following question: There is a 1 kilogram weight on planet M. Planet M has no atmosphere ...
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6answers
2k views

Electrostatic Potential Energy Derivation

How is the boxed step , physically as well as mathematically justified and correct ? Source:Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_potential_energy As work done = $- \Delta U $. for Conservative ...
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1answer
977 views

Why doesn't the potential energy of any object equal 0

Consider a particle on the ground. This particle is raised by a force of magnitude $mg$ to a height $h$ above the ground. At this point, the work done on the particle by the force is $mgh$, which is ...
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4answers
4k views

Is potential energy and “work done” the same thing?

Is potential energy and "work done" the same thing? If they are not one and the same thing then why is potential energy always associated with "work done"? Could you explain me with some examples?
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2answers
189 views

If an asteroid were threatening the Earth, could I deviate it just by jumping on it?

An impact by a 10 kilometres asteroid on the Earth has historically caused an extinction-level event due to catastrophic damage to the biosphere. There is also the threat from comets coming ...
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1answer
2k views

Derivation of formula of potential energy by a conservative force [duplicate]

the formula for potential energy by a conservative force is given by: $$ F = -\nabla U(r), $$ which in one dimension may be simplified to: $$ F = -\frac{dU}{dx} .$$ My question is how is it ...
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3answers
177 views

Confusion relating the application of Work-Energy theorem

Could someone kindly explain the solution to my confusion? When we walk at a constant speed up a steep hill, is work being done? Then why isn't our kinetic energy changing as work done is equal to ...
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3answers
363 views

Can endergonic reactions occur outside of living organisms?

If the Gibbs free energy equation is defined as: ∆G = ∆H - T∆S And the amount of energy/work released from a reaction is: ...
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3answers
15k views

Thermodynamics - Sign convention

I use the sign convention: Heat absorbed by the system = $q+$ (positive) Heat evolved by the system = $q-$ (negative) Work done on the system = $w +$ (positive) Work done by the system = $w -$ ...
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4answers
301 views

Magnetic force and work

If the magnetic force does no work on a particle with electric charge, then: How can you influence the motion of the particle? Is there perhaps another example of the work force but do not have a ...
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1answer
68 views

Why is the potential energy of a particle $mgh$ regardless of force?

Consider a particle raised to height $h$ by applying a constant force of $F$ vertically opposite to the direction of force of gravity on it. The potential energy of the particle is $$W = mgh$$ But, ...
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2answers
591 views

Increase in velocity by loss of mass? [closed]

A trolley of mass 300kg carrying a sand bag of 25kg is moving uniformly with speed of 27km/h on a frictionless track. After a while, sand starts leaking out of a hole on the floor of the trolley at ...
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6answers
6k views

Workdone in an equipotential surface is zero?

An equipotential surface is one in which all the points are at the same electric potential. If a charge is to be moved between any two points (say from point A to point B) on an equipotential surface, ...
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1answer
143 views

How did Feynman prove that energy cannot be extracted from electric field?

In the Feynman Lectures, vol. II, chapter 4, Feynman discusses electric potential and says: If we carry a charge from point $a \to b$, $$W = -\int_{a}^{b} \mathbf{F} \cdot ds.$$ Now, in general, ...