The product of the force on an object and the displacement the object undergoes along the direction of the force.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

2
votes
4answers
154 views

Why work $W$ and heat $Q$ are different concepts?

I understand heat as the flow of energy (through radiation, convection or conduction) from one body to another. When I think about conduction (for example) I visualize particles that jiggle a lot ...
2
votes
4answers
642 views

Is work done by how much velocity is changed or how much displacement is done?

A sailboat is moving at a constant velocity. Is work being done by a net external force acting on the boat? The answer key is "No" according to the work energy theorem about work is done when ...
2
votes
3answers
116 views

How do I relate $ds$ to $dx$?

A block of mass $5\text{ kg}$ is kept on an inclined plane with angle of inclination $37°$, attached to a spring with spring constant $10\text{ N/m}$ kept at the base of the incline. The ...
2
votes
2answers
204 views

Mechanical work to required battery power

I have a very practical question where I've calculated the mechanical work needed by a simple mechanical system by solving the line integral $W = \int_C \ F \ dx$. However, since I have a black spot ...
2
votes
3answers
167 views

Is there an intuitive explanation of the work formula?

Upon learning calculus, I decided it was time to derive all of classical mechanics to give myself a good understanding of physics. What I found was that, while trying to do so, I would need some ...
2
votes
2answers
108 views

Work done by frictional force on a sliding block

A block slides across a table horizontally with an initial velocity $V$. The frictional force $F$ brings it to rest after its Centre of Mass covers distance $S$. What is the work done by the ...
2
votes
2answers
79 views

Lack of rigour in usual derivation of Work-Energy Theorem

The derivation of the Work-Energy theorem usually goes as follows: You define the work done on a particle under net force $\vec{F}$ as $$W=\int\limits_C \vec{F}\cdot\mathrm{d}\vec{r}$$ And then you ...
2
votes
1answer
177 views

How did Feynman prove that energy cannot be extracted from electric field?

In the Feynman Lectures, vol. II, chapter 4, Feynman discusses electric potential and says: If we carry a charge from point $a \to b$, $$W = -\int_{a}^{b} \mathbf{F} \cdot ds.$$ Now, in general, ...
2
votes
5answers
462 views

when an object is lifted (at a constant velocity) shouldn't the work done on the object be zero? [duplicate]

When I lift an object from the ground (at a constant velocity) I'm applying force on the object equal to its weight and the earth is also pulling it downwards with equal amounts of force. So if the ...
2
votes
2answers
599 views

Entropy $dQ=TdS$ and Work $dW = -pdV$ conditions?

What are the conditions in order for the equations: Entropy $dQ = TdS$ and Work $dW = -p dV$ to work? I think for $dQ = T dS$, it must be a reversible process? But for $dW = -p dV$, shouldn't it ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Work done or not in this case?

I have a very simple question. A motorboat directed upstream is seen to be at rest from the bank of a river. Is the engine doing any work? Is it right to say that since it is not causing any ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively

I'm having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively. This is what I'm solid on so far: If you have a ball rolling down a hill, it loses potential energy and gains kinetic energy. ...
2
votes
4answers
150 views

If velocity is constant, how can $p = F\cdot v$ be non zero?

If an airplane of mass $m$ is flying at a constant speed $v$, the power of the airplane is $$P = m\cdot v\cdot g $$ where $g$ is the acceleration of gravity and therefore: $$ F = m\cdot g, $$ but, ...
2
votes
2answers
109 views

What is the meaning of the negative sign in $W = -\Delta U$?

What is the meaning of the negative sign in $W = -\Delta U$ ? As far as I understand, $W = -\Delta U = -(U_f - U_i) = U_i - U_f$. While $U_i$ is the initial potential energy (before applying the ...
2
votes
3answers
287 views

Is work done = change in KE, or change in mechanical energy?

Starting from $F = ma$ we get: $$ F=m\frac{dv}{dt} = m\frac{ds}{dt}\frac{dv}{ds} = mv\frac{dv}{ds} $$ which leads to the work done: $$ W = \int Fds = \int mvdv = m\frac{v^2}{2} - m\frac{u^2}{2} ...
2
votes
2answers
149 views

Factors on which Coefficient of restitution depend

What are the factors on which coefficient of restitution depend? What is the reason for more coefficient of restitution of two glass balls (0.95) than for two lead balls (0.20)?
2
votes
1answer
181 views

Is work is equal to $mv^2$ (without $\frac{1}{2}$)?

I was trying to come up with an equation for work that doesn't include time, because I don't know time. Here's what I did: $$ work = Fd = mad = m{v\over t}d = m{v\over\left({d\over v}\right)}d = ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Why do two equal-and-opposing forces each do work on a moving object but not on a stationary object?

Consider a point-mass $m$ having constant velocity but undergoing influence from two forces, $F_1$, $F_2$, having equal magnitude but opposite directions. Because the forces' magnitudes are equal, I ...
2
votes
3answers
5k views

Net work done on the body when we lift it and put it on the table is zero?

I'm little confused here. Work done on the body when we lift it and put it on the table is zero, because according to work energy theorem, change in kinetic energy of the body is zero. So, the net ...
2
votes
4answers
152 views

What exactly is work?

What exactly is work? My book confuses me: a force can lift an object to a height h, or it can accelerate an object through gravity. In all these cases, a force displaces an object and change the ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

What exactly is conservative vector field?

I'm studying calculus, but since the example involved a physical concept. I will ask here: This is how it goes: This means that in a conservative force field, the amount of work required to ...
2
votes
2answers
113 views

Where does this formula for sagging of a beam come from?

In one of my physics textbooks there is a chapter on the elasticity of materials which contains pretty basic outline about Young's modulus, stress-strain, elastic potential energy and related stuff. ...
2
votes
1answer
102 views

The work-energy theorem

Well here's the question. From some previous excercises we know that from \begin{align} A&=\int F\;ds,\\ &=\int ma\;ds, &&(F=ma)\\ &=\int m \frac{dv}{dt}\;ds, ...
2
votes
2answers
422 views

Understanding relationship between work and energy

I've read over 10 books about work and energy, and I just simply can't understand it. First of all, they go ahead and randomly define that work is force times distance: $$W=F X \cos\theta$$ Okay, ...
2
votes
2answers
20k views

What is the relationship between Force and Kinetic Energy?

I am an Middle-School (Grade 8) student, who is self-learning classical mechanics. I saw this equation from Classical Mechanics: $\vec F=m \vec a$, the following equation is pretty straight forward ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Work done by isothermal expansion from two different viewpoints

Consider an adiabatic system as follows. It consists of a gas in a container and a piston. Initially, the system is at equilibrium and the gas inside it occupies a volume $V_i$ at a pressure $p_i$ ...
2
votes
2answers
274 views

Question related to work done and energy

Suppose you lift a box from the ground over your head. You will be using energy as there is work done. But when you keep the box lifted over your head, aren't you using any extra energy?
2
votes
1answer
4k views

Work in circular motions

Suppose that a satellite circles around a planet that exerts $2000N$ of gravitational force on the satellite. I understand the fact that since the circular motion and the centripetal force are ...
2
votes
2answers
463 views

Signs in proof of gravitation potential energy (GPE)

Proof of gravitational potential energy. Work done by gravity in bringing mass from infinity to a distance of $r$ between masses. When we use the integration formula and arrive at the answer we ...
2
votes
2answers
453 views

Does a different opposing force affect work?

Suppose a man exerts $10~N$ as he lifts a $1~kg$ box a distance of $2~m$ against Earth's gravity. To determine work we can use the following equation: $$ W = F \cdot d \\ W = (10~N) \cdot (2~m) = ...
2
votes
1answer
400 views

A dielectric table is being inserted between a plate capacitor and $\triangle U<0$ how to deduce the table is attracted to the plates?

I am practicing for an exam in my Physics $2$ course. One of a previews exam questions described a plate capacitor and asked to calculate the initial energy $U_{0}$, then a dielectric table was ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Thermodynamic cycles, when is the work negative/positive?

ever since I begun calculating thermodynamical cycles, I've had problems with determining the sign of the work along a particular bit of the cycle. Of course, I guess that an arbitrary cycle is ...
2
votes
1answer
310 views

Work done by gravity on Water

Now according to me we would see change in potential energy of system and equate it to the work done by gravity. But when we see this the first column lowers by $H/2$ and right one rises by $H/2$ ...
2
votes
1answer
138 views

Conservative forces intuition

Take a gravitational field (with all the field lines pointing inwards) and a perfectly circular curve as an object's trajectory. To find the work exerted by the force on the object, compute the line ...
2
votes
1answer
237 views

Understanding Work and the conservation of energy

We have a car with a mass of $780 kg$ with travels with a speed of $50 km/h$. The car brakes and after $4,2m$ is stops completely. Warmth is created. Calculate the friction. I solved this easily, by ...
2
votes
1answer
316 views

Moving along friction surfaces

If a particle moves along a one dimensional surface with constant friction. As the particle moves from point $A$ to point $B$ it loses an amount of energy equals $E(A,B)$. Consider that the particle ...
2
votes
1answer
10k views

Needed Energy For Lifting 200 kg weight

I'd like to learn how much energy I need to lift a 200 kilograms weight on normal earth conditions? For example how much electric power do we need? I'm not a physicist and not a student and this ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

How do I find work done by friction over a curve represented by a polynomial?

I am facing a problem in Physics. Problem: What will be the work done by the frictional force over a polynomial curve if a body is sliding on this polynomial($a+bx+cx^2+dx^3+\ldots$) curve from rest ...
2
votes
2answers
290 views

In continuum mechanics, what is work potential in the context of total potential energy?

I'm reading a book on the finite element method. Specifically I'm looking at the background material where they are discussing potential energy, equilibrium, and the Rayleigh–Ritz method. The book ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Work in gravitational field

I was doing a test a few days ago and there was a fairly simple task involving gravity basics. The task asks me to calculate the work done by moving an Earth's artificial satellite from a stationary ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

Does an opposing force cause loss/ waste of energy?

I found this answer by John Rennie (in the question you see the train on a track): when the train moves a distance $d$ the work done on the train is $Fd\cos\theta$. It's certainly true that ...
2
votes
2answers
59 views

Work done in lifting chain with nonuniform linear density

I am teaching calculus, and a natural-seeming problem type just occured to me. It would go something like: a 2m chain hangs from the top of a building. Its density at a point h meters from the edge ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

Another condition of calculating work

Let's imagine that there is a box placed at the corner of a table, and I push it so that my applied force makes an angle of 30° from the table's surface. The box would move and, due to the effect ...
2
votes
4answers
126 views

What is the intuition behind “Net Work is Zero”?

I tried searching the answer to this all over the internet, but still cannot grasp this concept. So, when a book is being lifted, let's say $25 meters$ with a mass of $4kg$, with constant speed. I ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Work due to air resistance

I was trying to find the distance a machine system I designed would potentially go. The machine works like this: A mass $M$ drops down and through a system of pulleys, pulls a wheel wound with the ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

Separating the potential energy of a system of particles.

Assuming all forces derive form a conservative source and that all forces observe the strong form of the third law, how do we arrive at the following equation? \begin{equation} V=\sum _i V_i+\frac ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

Minimum Power Required

Here is a question, I found two methods to solve it, differing in the answers and I'm not sure why a method is incorrect. Question: A fire hose of cross section area ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Work Done On a Body When It is Not in Contact with the agent of the Force

Is it necessary for work to be done on a body that the agent of the force remains in contact with the body? For example, if I hit a football with my foot with a small amount of force and it moves a ...
2
votes
2answers
551 views

Falling chain with friction

I really need some help with a physics problem, and I guess my doubt is more conceptual, than question based. But still, let me pose it to you: A uniform chain of mass $M$ and length $L$ lies on ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Does moving something horizontally in gravity do no work?

Bill’s job is to lift bags of flour and place them in the back of a truck, which is parked next to him. Sally is loading the same bags of flour into a similar truck that is located 10 m away. ...