The product of the force on an object and the displacement the object undergoes along the direction of the force.

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743 views

Energy of electron spinning in a magnetic field

When an electron travels in circles in a uniform magnetic field, it must lose energy because all accelerated charges radiate, and must therefore spiral down to the center. Is this energy compensated ...
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2answers
4k views

work done by tension

The problem statement, all variables and given/known data Consider the following arrangement: Calculate the work done by tension on 2kg block during its motion on circular track from point $A$ to ...
3
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1answer
419 views

Intuition behind Work

I have a doubt in understanding the intuition behind the concept of work. First of all, I think this isn't duplicate, I've searched on the site, and the closest thing I've found was this post which is ...
3
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2answers
265 views

When work is performed solely by magnetism, is there an equivalent loss of energy from the magnetic field?

When two magnets are placed within appropriate proximity and released, the attractive force will perform work and bring them together. Work is performed overcoming friction. Can we measure a ...
3
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2answers
3k views

Does moving something horizontally in gravity do no work?

Bill’s job is to lift bags of flour and place them in the back of a truck, which is parked next to him. Sally is loading the same bags of flour into a similar truck that is located 10 m away. ...
3
votes
0answers
150 views

How much work can a single grain of rice do? [closed]

I found a website saying a grain of rice contains 1/10 kcal. I'm not a physicist and haven't done maths for a long time. But here's what I came up with: E = m * g * h One small calorie equals ...
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6answers
815 views

Centripetal Force Acceleration

In uniform circular motion, acceleration is $\frac{v^2}{r}$ and time which it acts $\rightarrow 0$. So $\Delta v = 0$, but then why/how does direction change, when the acceleration should be ...
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1answer
371 views

Work Done to click a mouse?

Is there any good research done to find out the work done in clicking a mouse button. any link to that would be greatly appreciated. P.S. i am not too sure whether this question belongs here or ...
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1answer
1k views

What is the difference between $Q=\Delta U+W$ and $\Delta U=Q+W$?

Is $Q=\Delta U+W$ for when the the work is done from the system while $\Delta U=Q+W$ is for when the work is done by the system? Will anybody explain this to me, please? When do we use $Q=\Delta ...
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5answers
1k views

Is there a mathematical derivation of potential energy that is *not* rooted in the conservation of energy?

For simplicity I'll consider only gravity, but in general this question only applies to conservative forces. As per my understanding, the way one gets to the equation for gravitational potential ...
2
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3answers
719 views

What is the work done against a force?

Suppose a particle travels a path $\gamma : I\subset \mathbb{R}\to \mathbb{R}^3$ subject to a force $\mathbf{F}: \mathbb{R}^3\to T\mathbb{R}^3$, then we know that we define the work done by the force ...
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4answers
14k views

What is the difference between dot and cross product?

What is the difference between dot product and cross product? Why do we use cross product to find torque, why can't we use dot product? Also we use dot product to find work done and not cross ...
2
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3answers
214 views

Is there an intuitive explanation of the work formula?

Upon learning calculus, I decided it was time to derive all of classical mechanics to give myself a good understanding of physics. What I found was that, while trying to do so, I would need some ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

Does stopping the same bike and rider at the same velocity with the front brake require less energy than the back brake?

It's the same body made by the rider and the bike moving at the same speed. So, even though braking on the front/back alters the normal forces on the opposite wheels thus creating more friction with ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Does the line integral definition of Work involve distance or displacement?

My textbook reports the following definition of Work: where ds is the infinitesimal displacement. I know that an infinitesimal displacement is usually denoted by dr and I also know that the ...
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4answers
195 views

Why work $W$ and heat $Q$ are different concepts?

I understand heat as the flow of energy (through radiation, convection or conduction) from one body to another. When I think about conduction (for example) I visualize particles that jiggle a lot ...
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votes
4answers
2k views

Is work done by how much velocity is changed or how much displacement is done?

A sailboat is moving at a constant velocity. Is work being done by a net external force acting on the boat? The answer key is "No" according to the work energy theorem about work is done when ...
2
votes
3answers
121 views

How do I relate $ds$ to $dx$?

A block of mass $5\text{ kg}$ is kept on an inclined plane with angle of inclination $37°$, attached to a spring with spring constant $10\text{ N/m}$ kept at the base of the incline. The ...
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2answers
908 views

Entropy $dQ=TdS$ and Work $dW = -pdV$ conditions?

What are the conditions in order for the equations: Entropy $dQ = TdS$ and Work $dW = -p dV$ to work? I think for $dQ = T dS$, it must be a reversible process? But for $dW = -p dV$, shouldn't it ...
2
votes
2answers
210 views

Mechanical work to required battery power

I have a very practical question where I've calculated the mechanical work needed by a simple mechanical system by solving the line integral $W = \int_C \ F \ dx$. However, since I have a black spot ...
2
votes
2answers
243 views

Work done by frictional force on a sliding block

A block slides across a table horizontally with an initial velocity $V$. The frictional force $F$ brings it to rest after its Centre of Mass covers distance $S$. What is the work done by the ...
2
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2answers
87 views

Lack of rigour in usual derivation of Work-Energy Theorem

The derivation of the Work-Energy theorem usually goes as follows: You define the work done on a particle under net force $\vec{F}$ as $$W=\int\limits_C \vec{F}\cdot\mathrm{d}\vec{r}$$ And then you ...
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1answer
195 views

How did Feynman prove that energy cannot be extracted from electric field?

In the Feynman Lectures, vol. II, chapter 4, Feynman discusses electric potential and says: If we carry a charge from point $a \to b$, $$W = -\int_{a}^{b} \mathbf{F} \cdot ds.$$ Now, in general, ...
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5answers
2k views

when an object is lifted (at a constant velocity) shouldn't the work done on the object be zero? [duplicate]

When I lift an object from the ground (at a constant velocity) I'm applying force on the object equal to its weight and the earth is also pulling it downwards with equal amounts of force. So if the ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

Work done or not in this case?

I have a very simple question. A motorboat directed upstream is seen to be at rest from the bank of a river. Is the engine doing any work? Is it right to say that since it is not causing any ...
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2answers
2k views

Having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively

I'm having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively. This is what I'm solid on so far: If you have a ball rolling down a hill, it loses potential energy and gains kinetic energy. ...
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1answer
44 views

Is the integral of $dK$ equal the work done?

$$\frac{dK}{dt} = \frac{d}{dt} (1/2 mv^2) = mv \frac{dv}{dt} = F\frac{dx}{dt}$$ $$\implies dK = F. dr$$ Also, work is defined as $W = \int F. dr$. So does this imply integral $dK = W$?
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4answers
199 views

What exactly is work?

What exactly is work? My book confuses me: a force can lift an object to a height h, or it can accelerate an object through gravity. In all these cases, a force displaces an object and change the ...
2
votes
4answers
182 views

If velocity is constant, how can $p = F\cdot v$ be non zero?

If an airplane of mass $m$ is flying at a constant speed $v$, the power of the airplane is $$P = m\cdot v\cdot g $$ where $g$ is the acceleration of gravity and therefore: $$ F = m\cdot g, $$ but, ...
2
votes
2answers
256 views

What is the meaning of the negative sign in $W = -\Delta U$?

What is the meaning of the negative sign in $W = -\Delta U$ ? As far as I understand, $W = -\Delta U = -(U_f - U_i) = U_i - U_f$. While $U_i$ is the initial potential energy (before applying the ...
2
votes
3answers
619 views

Is work done = change in KE, or change in mechanical energy?

Starting from $F = ma$ we get: $$ F=m\frac{dv}{dt} = m\frac{ds}{dt}\frac{dv}{ds} = mv\frac{dv}{ds} $$ which leads to the work done: $$ W = \int Fds = \int mvdv = m\frac{v^2}{2} - m\frac{u^2}{2} ...
2
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2answers
506 views

Factors on which Coefficient of restitution depend

What are the factors on which coefficient of restitution depend? What is the reason for more coefficient of restitution of two glass balls (0.95) than for two lead balls (0.20)?
2
votes
1answer
187 views

Is work is equal to $mv^2$ (without $\frac{1}{2}$)?

I was trying to come up with an equation for work that doesn't include time, because I don't know time. Here's what I did: $$ work = Fd = mad = m{v\over t}d = m{v\over\left({d\over v}\right)}d = ...
2
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2answers
1k views

Why do two equal-and-opposing forces each do work on a moving object but not on a stationary object?

Consider a point-mass $m$ having constant velocity but undergoing influence from two forces, $F_1$, $F_2$, having equal magnitude but opposite directions. Because the forces' magnitudes are equal, I ...
2
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1answer
6k views

Work in circular motions

Suppose that a satellite circles around a planet that exerts $2000N$ of gravitational force on the satellite. I understand the fact that since the circular motion and the centripetal force are ...
2
votes
1answer
433 views

Why work to change velocity from 0 to 20 km/h is less then from 20 to 40? [duplicate]

Imagine spaceship in vacuum with mass = 1. At beginning, it has velocity 0, and kinetic energy 0. $$W_1 = 0$$ Then, it turns on its engine, and changes velocity from 0 to 20 (delta v = 20). It's ...
2
votes
3answers
6k views

Net work done on the body when we lift it and put it on the table is zero?

I'm little confused here. Work done on the body when we lift it and put it on the table is zero, because according to work energy theorem, change in kinetic energy of the body is zero. So, the net ...
2
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2answers
50 views

Why dont you take derivative of force in definition of power ? P=F.v

The derivative of work is $\bf F\cdot v .$ $$P(t)= \frac{\mathrm dW}{\mathrm dt}= \mathbf{F\cdot v}=-\frac{\mathrm dU}{\mathrm dt}\;.$$ But why not $$(\mathrm d(\mathbf F)/\mathrm dx)\cdot \mathbf x ...
2
votes
3answers
147 views

The float on a frozen lake

We have a bit of a debate going on at work. If a basketball (or any round float - let's assume one firm enough to not change size with temperature) was floating on a lake, and overnight the lake ...
2
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1answer
44 views

Work done by a body

This is a fundamental doubt Can we use the formula W is equal to F*D only when the body is accelerated? For example if the acceleration does not remain constant can we use it?
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2answers
51 views

I have trouble understanding work

I am just starting out in physics. I study in germany, so excuse me if I get some terms wrong. I am trying to understand why 'Work = Force * Way' and I think I just have some trouble imagining what ...
2
votes
2answers
514 views

Work done by a non-conservative force and change in potential energy

I know that the work done by a non-conservative force is equal to the change in total mechanical energy (from Work-Energy Theorem). But I read in a place that "Non-conservative forces don't affect ...
2
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1answer
62 views

What exactly is conservative vector field?

I'm studying calculus, but since the example involved a physical concept. I will ask here: This is how it goes: This means that in a conservative force field, the amount of work required to ...
2
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2answers
212 views

Where does this formula for sagging of a beam come from?

In one of my physics textbooks there is a chapter on the elasticity of materials which contains pretty basic outline about Young's modulus, stress-strain, elastic potential energy and related stuff. ...
2
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1answer
113 views

The work-energy theorem

Well here's the question. From some previous excercises we know that from \begin{align} A&=\int F\;ds,\\ &=\int ma\;ds, &&(F=ma)\\ &=\int m \frac{dv}{dt}\;ds, ...
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2answers
316 views

Question related to work done and energy

Suppose you lift a box from the ground over your head. You will be using energy as there is work done. But when you keep the box lifted over your head, aren't you using any extra energy?
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votes
2answers
545 views

Signs in proof of gravitation potential energy (GPE)

Proof of gravitational potential energy. Work done by gravity in bringing mass from infinity to a distance of $r$ between masses. When we use the integration formula and arrive at the answer we ...
2
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2answers
582 views

Does a different opposing force affect work?

Suppose a man exerts $10~N$ as he lifts a $1~kg$ box a distance of $2~m$ against Earth's gravity. To determine work we can use the following equation: $$ W = F \cdot d \\ W = (10~N) \cdot (2~m) = ...
2
votes
1answer
439 views

A dielectric table is being inserted between a plate capacitor and $\triangle U<0$ how to deduce the table is attracted to the plates?

I am practicing for an exam in my Physics $2$ course. One of a previews exam questions described a plate capacitor and asked to calculate the initial energy $U_{0}$, then a dielectric table was ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Thermodynamic cycles, when is the work negative/positive?

ever since I begun calculating thermodynamical cycles, I've had problems with determining the sign of the work along a particular bit of the cycle. Of course, I guess that an arbitrary cycle is ...