The product of the force on an object and the displacement the object undergoes along the direction of the force.

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227 views

When work is performed solely by magnetism, is there an equivalent loss of energy from the magnetic field?

When two magnets are placed within appropriate proximity and released, the attractive force will perform work and bring them together. Work is performed overcoming friction. Can we measure a ...
2
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6answers
572 views

Centripetal Force Acceleration

In uniform circular motion, acceleration is $\frac{v^2}{r}$ and time which it acts $\rightarrow 0$. So $\Delta v = 0$, but then why/how does direction change, when the acceleration should be ...
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1answer
199 views

Work Done to click a mouse?

Is there any good research done to find out the work done in clicking a mouse button. any link to that would be greatly appreciated. P.S. i am not too sure whether this question belongs here or ...
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4answers
300 views

Why can't the work done by a non-conservative force be zero?

Why can't the work done by a non-conservative force be zero? The displacement along a closed path is always zero. So, whatever be the type of force, variable or constant, the work has to be zero. Why ...
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3answers
915 views

Why doesn't static friction decelerate a rolling body?

I know that static friction isn't the cause of deceleration of a rolling body. But if static friction is the only force in the horizontal direction, then shouldn't there be some acceleration produced ...
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6answers
1k views

Intuitively, how can the work done on an object be equal to zero?

To my understanding the work done on an object is defined mathematically as: $$W = \vec{F}\cdot\vec{S}=|\vec{F}||\vec{S}|cos\theta$$ This, I understand. My problem is that I don't understand that if ...
2
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5answers
762 views

Is there a mathematical derivation of potential energy that is *not* rooted in the conservation of energy?

For simplicity I'll consider only gravity, but in general this question only applies to conservative forces. As per my understanding, the way one gets to the equation for gravitational potential ...
2
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1answer
342 views

What is the difference between $Q=\Delta U+W$ and $\Delta U=Q+W$?

Is $Q=\Delta U+W$ for when the the work is done from the system while $\Delta U=Q+W$ is for when the work is done by the system? Will anybody explain this to me, please? When do we use $Q=\Delta ...
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4answers
76 views

Is work done by how much velocity is changed or how much displacement is done?

A sailboat is moving at a constant velocity. Is work being done by a net external force acting on the boat? The answer key is "No" according to the work energy theorem about work is done when ...
2
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3answers
109 views

How do I relate $ds$ to $dx$?

A block of mass $5\text{ kg}$ is kept on an inclined plane with angle of inclination $37°$, attached to a spring with spring constant $10\text{ N/m}$ kept at the base of the incline. The ...
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2answers
186 views

Mechanical work to required battery power

I have a very practical question where I've calculated the mechanical work needed by a simple mechanical system by solving the line integral $W = \int_C \ F \ dx$. However, since I have a black spot ...
2
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1answer
39 views

Work done or not in this case?

I have a very simple question. A motorboat directed upstream is seen to be at rest from the bank of a river. Is the engine doing any work? Is it right to say that since it is not causing any ...
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2answers
636 views

Having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively

I'm having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively. This is what I'm solid on so far: If you have a ball rolling down a hill, it loses potential energy and gains kinetic energy. ...
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2answers
154 views

Entropy $dQ=TdS$ and Work $dW = -pdV$ conditions?

What are the conditions in order for the equations: Entropy $dQ = TdS$ and Work $dW = -p dV$ to work? I think for $dQ = T dS$, it must be a reversible process? But for $dW = -p dV$, shouldn't it ...
2
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1answer
2k views

How to understand the work-energy theorem?

How to understand the work-energy theorem? I took a short lecture on physics for engineering last week. The lecturer emphasized that the work done on an object will cause the kinetic energy change as ...
2
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2answers
85 views

Work done by isothermal expansion from two different viewpoints

Consider an adiabatic system as follows. It consists of a gas in a container and a piston. Initially, the system is at equilibrium and the gas inside it occupies a volume $V_i$ at a pressure $p_i$ ...
2
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2answers
190 views

Question related to work done and energy

Suppose you lift a box from the ground over your head. You will be using energy as there is work done. But when you keep the box lifted over your head, aren't you using any extra energy?
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2answers
501 views

Work done by Lorentz Force in case of motional emf

In the classical example of the slidewire generator where the rod slides on a U-shaped conductor in a magnetic field, we get a charge separation due to the Lorentz force. The way the induced emf is ...
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2answers
276 views

Signs in proof of gravitation potential energy (GPE)

Proof of gravitational potential energy. Work done by gravity in bringing mass from infinity to a distance of $r$ between masses. When we use the integration formula and arrive at the answer we ...
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2answers
242 views

Does a different opposing force affect work?

Suppose a man exerts $10~N$ as he lifts a $1~kg$ box a distance of $2~m$ against Earth's gravity. To determine work we can use the following equation: $$ W = F \cdot d \\ W = (10~N) \cdot (2~m) = ...
2
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1answer
238 views

A dielectric table is being inserted between a plate capacitor and $\triangle U<0$ how to deduce the table is attracted to the plates?

I am practicing for an exam in my Physics $2$ course. One of a previews exam questions described a plate capacitor and asked to calculate the initial energy $U_{0}$, then a dielectric table was ...
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1answer
841 views

Thermodynamic cycles, when is the work negative/positive?

ever since I begun calculating thermodynamical cycles, I've had problems with determining the sign of the work along a particular bit of the cycle. Of course, I guess that an arbitrary cycle is ...
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1answer
192 views

Work done by gravity on Water

Now according to me we would see change in potential energy of system and equate it to the work done by gravity. But when we see this the first column lowers by $H/2$ and right one rises by $H/2$ ...
2
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1answer
112 views

Conservative forces intuition

Take a gravitational field (with all the field lines pointing inwards) and a perfectly circular curve as an object's trajectory. To find the work exerted by the force on the object, compute the line ...
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1answer
196 views

Understanding Work and the conservation of energy

We have a car with a mass of $780 kg$ with travels with a speed of $50 km/h$. The car brakes and after $4,2m$ is stops completely. Warmth is created. Calculate the friction. I solved this easily, by ...
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1answer
201 views

Moving along friction surfaces

If a particle moves along a one dimensional surface with constant friction. As the particle moves from point $A$ to point $B$ it loses an amount of energy equals $E(A,B)$. Consider that the particle ...
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3answers
1k views

How do I find work done by friction over a curve represented by a polynomial?

I am facing a problem in Physics. Problem: What will be the work done by the frictional force over a polynomial curve if a body is sliding on this polynomial($a+bx+cx^2+dx^3+\ldots$) curve from rest ...
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2answers
190 views

In continuum mechanics, what is work potential in the context of total potential energy?

I'm reading a book on the finite element method. Specifically I'm looking at the background material where they are discussing potential energy, equilibrium, and the Rayleigh–Ritz method. The book ...
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1answer
57 views

What is the relationship between Force and Kinetic Energy?

I am an Middle-School (Grade 8) student, who is self-learning classical mechanics. I saw this equation from Classical Mechanics: $\vec F=m \vec a$, the following equation is pretty straight forward ...
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1answer
23 views

Minimum Power Required

Here is a question, I found two methods to solve it, differing in the answers and I'm not sure why a method is incorrect. Question: A fire hose of cross section area ...
2
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1answer
53 views

Work Done On a Body When It is Not in Contact with the agent of the Force

Is it necessary for work to be done on a body that the agent of the force remains in contact with the body? For example, if I hit a football with my foot with a small amount of force and it moves a ...
2
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2answers
410 views

Falling chain with friction

I really need some help with a physics problem, and I guess my doubt is more conceptual, than question based. But still, let me pose it to you: A uniform chain of mass $M$ and length $L$ lies on ...
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1answer
1k views

Does moving something horizontally in gravity do no work?

Bill’s job is to lift bags of flour and place them in the back of a truck, which is parked next to him. Sally is loading the same bags of flour into a similar truck that is located 10 m away. ...
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3answers
2k views

Net work done on the body when we lift it and put it on the table is zero?

I'm little confused here. Work done on the body when we lift it and put it on the table is zero, because according to work energy theorem, change in kinetic energy of the body is zero. So, the net ...
2
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1answer
74 views

Does distance traveled by a vehicle after its engine has been switched off depend on its mass at all?

A vehicle moving with some velocity on a rough horizontal road finally comes to rest after its engine has been turned off. Intuitively, it seems a vehicle with greater mass would stop first because it ...
2
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2answers
283 views

Why can't the units of work and torque be interchanged? [duplicate]

When I'm studying about work and torque, I found that their unit are the same. But, why don't we use Joule (unit of work) instead of Newton-meter (unit of torque)? Since $\mathrm{1\ Joule = 1\ Nm}$, ...
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2answers
291 views

Energy of electron spinning in a magnetic field

When an electron travels in circles in a uniform magnetic field, it must lose energy because all accelerated charges radiate, and must therefore spiral down to the center. Is this energy compensated ...
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2answers
66 views

What does $ {\bf F} = \frac{\mathrm{d}W}{\mathrm{d}{\bf x}}$ actually mean?

What does the formula $$ {\bf F} ~=~ \frac{\mathrm{d}W}{\mathrm{d}{\bf x}}$$ actually mean? Here $\mathrm{d}W$ is the work done in a small period, ${\bf F}$ is the force and $\mathrm{d}{\bf x}$ is a ...
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2answers
177 views

Does gravity exert more “power” when an object is traveling faster?

So, this question arose when I was pondering the meaning of horsepower and torque in cars. I thought of the following question: There is a 1 kilogram weight on planet M. Planet M has no atmosphere ...
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2answers
2k views

Proof of conservation of energy?

How is it proved to be always true? It's a fundamental principle in Physics, that is based on all of our currents observations of multiple systems in the universe, is it always true to all systems? ...
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6answers
1k views

Electrostatic Potential Energy Derivation

How is the boxed step , physically as well as mathematically justified and correct ? Source:Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_potential_energy As work done = $- \Delta U $. for Conservative ...
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3answers
6k views

Why work is a scalar and not a vector?

Work (in physics) is a scalar but why? and why not a vector?
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5answers
3k views

Workdone in an equipotential surface is zero?

An equipotential surface is one in which all the points are at the same electric potential. If a charge is to be moved between any two points (say from point A to point B) on an equipotential surface, ...
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1answer
369 views

Why doesn't the potential energy of any object equal 0

Consider a particle on the ground. This particle is raised by a force of magnitude $mg$ to a height $h$ above the ground. At this point, the work done on the particle by the force is $mgh$, which is ...
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3answers
273 views

Can endergonic reactions occur outside of living organisms?

If the Gibbs free energy equation is defined as: ∆G = ∆H - T∆S And the amount of energy/work released from a reaction is: ...
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4answers
239 views

Magnetic force and work

If the magnetic force does no work on a particle with electric charge, then: How can you influence the motion of the particle? Is there perhaps another example of the work force but do not have a ...
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1answer
54 views

Why is the potential energy of a particle $mgh$ regardless of force?

Consider a particle raised to height $h$ by applying a constant force of $F$ vertically opposite to the direction of force of gravity on it. The potential energy of the particle is $$W = mgh$$ But, ...
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3answers
7k views

Thermodynamics - Sign convention

I use the sign convention: Heat absorbed by the system = $q+$ (positive) Heat evolved by the system = $q-$ (negative) Work done on the system = $w +$ (positive) Work done by the system = $w -$ ...
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1answer
83 views

Confusion with curl of Lorentz magnetic force

Since the magnetic force is a no work force, $dW=\vec F\cdot d\vec r=0$ for $\vec F(\vec r)=q(\vec v(\vec r) \times \vec B(\vec r))$, therefore $\oint \vec F \cdot d\vec r=0$ by Stoke's theorem. ...
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2answers
205 views

Why do two equal-and-opposing forces each do work on a moving object but not on a stationary object?

Consider a point-mass $m$ having constant velocity but undergoing influence from two forces, $F_1$, $F_2$, having equal magnitude but opposite directions. Because the forces' magnitudes are equal, I ...