1
vote
1answer
36 views

Work done (by gravity) on paired blocks [closed]

Why does gravity do more work on the block going down? The total work done (by gravity) on the $8kg$ block is more than the work done (by gravity) on the lighter block. How?
16
votes
4answers
2k views

How can we move an object with zero velocity?

Consider there is a box of mass $m$ at rest on the floor. Most books give an example that we need to do a work of $mgh$ to lift the box $h$ upward. If we analyze this work done, the external force ...
0
votes
2answers
91 views

Rolling disk in inclined plane and flat plane? [duplicate]

A disk is rolling (not sliding) in the inclined plane with initial velocity of zero. So there is friction between disk and plane. But when we use the energy conservation rule, we consider as: ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Measuring energy when no work is done — comparing push-ups to planks

tl;dr Is there any meaningful (physical) way to compare the energy expended in the exercise of doing $x$ pushups in $t_1$ seconds, vs the exercise of doing the plank for $t_2$ seconds? I'm ...
1
vote
1answer
164 views

Why doesn't the potential energy of any object equal 0

Consider a particle on the ground. This particle is raised by a force of magnitude $mg$ to a height $h$ above the ground. At this point, the work done on the particle by the force is $mgh$, which is ...
1
vote
1answer
429 views

Calculate work done in an inclined plane [closed]

How can you calculate the work done by a force (of unknown quantity) exerted on a 10kg block on an inclined plane. The force is pointing upwards and parallel to the incline (which is inclined 30 ...
-4
votes
4answers
137 views

Work and its nature?

Suppose we have a constant force $\overrightarrow{F}$ and in the direction of force we have 2 point $x_1$ and $x_2$ in that order. And we have to calculate work done on moving frok $x_1$ to $x_2$ and ...
1
vote
2answers
153 views

Question related to work done and energy

Suppose you lift a box from the ground over your head. You will be using energy as there is work done. But when you keep the box lifted over your head, aren't you using any extra energy?
-1
votes
4answers
233 views

Is potential energy and “work done” the same thing?

Is potential energy and "work done" the same thing? If they are not one and the same thing then why is potential energy always associated with "work done"? Could you explain me with some examples?
3
votes
2answers
252 views

Is any work done if I walk in a circle?

My friend and I were arguing about this and I was wondering if someone out there could settle this for us. Basically, he and I were walking to buy some stamps. When we were on our return trip he ...
1
vote
2answers
146 views

Does gravity exert more “power” when an object is traveling faster?

So, this question arose when I was pondering the meaning of horsepower and torque in cars. I thought of the following question: There is a 1 kilogram weight on planet M. Planet M has no atmosphere ...
1
vote
2answers
169 views

Increase in velocity by loss of mass? [closed]

A trolley of mass 300kg carrying a sand bag of 25kg is moving uniformly with speed of 27km/h on a frictionless track. After a while, sand starts leaking out of a hole on the floor of the trolley at ...
4
votes
2answers
178 views

What's the difference between work in thermodynamics and mechanics?

What is the difference between work in thermodynamics and work in mechanics?
0
votes
0answers
152 views

Work done by rolling vs skidding friction force

Two identical bicycles having equal weight riders are traveling along a level road adjacent to each other with the same non-zero velocity. Bike A, (the "skidder"), applies the rear brake strongly ...
1
vote
2answers
486 views

Why doesn't static friction decelerate a rolling body?

I know that static friction isn't the cause of deceleration of a rolling body. But if static friction is the only force in the horizontal direction, then shouldn't there be some acceleration produced ...
4
votes
2answers
112 views

Work done on stationary rocket

Suppose I have a rocket thats exerts a force (with negligible loses in mass), which cancels out the downward force of gravity. Clearly my rocket could be moving at a constant velocity (ignore air ...
1
vote
0answers
350 views

Work, Energy, Power, Force question [closed]

Question: 3 boys push a small car 25 m up a hill inclined at 19° to the horizontal. The car has a weight of 860 N and they push it at a steady speed of 0.5 m s-1 against an opposing force of friction ...
0
votes
1answer
777 views

Does a force do work on an object with constant velocity?

I know that a force does no work on an object if the object's displacement is zero, but if an object is moving at a constant velocity $\bar{v}$, and a force $\bar f$ (let's say that $\bar f$ and $\bar ...
1
vote
6answers
708 views

Intuitively, how can the work done on an object be equal to zero?

To my understanding the work done on an object is defined mathematically as: $$W = \vec{F}\cdot\vec{S}=|\vec{F}||\vec{S}|cos\theta$$ This, I understand. My problem is that I don't understand that if ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

Why work is a scalar and not a vector?

Work (in physics) is a scalar but why? and why not a vector?
0
votes
1answer
515 views

Solve a problem of work and energy

A man pulling sled of his daughter by a massless rope, climbing a snowy hill whose slope is equal to 15 °. Considering that the mass of the sled is $4Kg$, the girl's $26Kg$ and $\mu _c = 0,25$, ...
0
votes
2answers
406 views

Why does the amount of energy transferred depend on distance rather than time?

The change in energy of an object can be determined by the work equation, where work is the change in energy: $$ W = F \cdot d $$ I conceptualize the transfer of energy as simply a series of small ...
2
votes
2answers
185 views

Does a different opposing force affect work?

Suppose a man exerts $10~N$ as he lifts a $1~kg$ box a distance of $2~m$ against Earth's gravity. To determine work we can use the following equation: $$ W = F \cdot d \\ W = (10~N) \cdot (2~m) = ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Work Done On a Body When It is Not in Contact with the agent of the Force

Is it necessary for work to be done on a body that the agent of the force remains in contact with the body? For example, if I hit a football with my foot with a small amount of force and it moves a ...
5
votes
7answers
2k views

If the net work on a particle is zero, can the speed change?

The following question was on a quiz in physics class: If the net work done on a particle is zero, which of the following statements must be true? a) The velocity is zero b) The velocity is ...
0
votes
1answer
622 views

Can internal forces do work?

My Mechanics textbook claims that the sum of the work by internal forces is not generally zero. translated to English the paragraph reads: Notice about the work by internal forces: the work by ...
2
votes
2answers
378 views

Falling chain with friction

I really need some help with a physics problem, and I guess my doubt is more conceptual, than question based. But still, let me pose it to you: A uniform chain of mass $M$ and length $L$ lies on ...
2
votes
1answer
193 views

Is my textbook teaching an incorrect concept of Work?

I fear my textbook is teaching an incorrect concept of Work. I am very frustrated right now since I was struggling to understand the concept in the way that was explained in the textbook and my ...
0
votes
1answer
268 views

Is there another way to calculate the work done by air resistance?

A ball of mass $0.37\text{ kg}$ is thrown upward along the vertical with a initial speed of $14\text{ m/s}$, and reaches a maximum height of $8.4\text{ m}$. a) What is the work done by air ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Relation between work, kinetic energy and potential energy

We derived two equations in class. The work done between two points $A$, $B$ is equal to the difference between the kinetic energy at the last point and the one at the first point. The work done ...
2
votes
2answers
441 views

Having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively

I'm having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively. This is what I'm solid on so far: If you have a ball rolling down a hill, it loses potential energy and gains kinetic energy. ...
3
votes
2answers
579 views

Is any work done when I walk?

I am trying to figure out the amount of work done when I walk X miles or for X minutes. So I got Work=Force x Distance and Force=Mass x Acceleration and Acceleration=(change in velocity)/time. I am ...
3
votes
2answers
225 views

How to reconcile the two definitions of work? (mechanical and thermodynamical)

When studying classical mechanics, work is defined as: $W_M=\int F_{tot} \hspace{2 mm} dx$. However, for thermodynamics, work is defined as: $W_T=\int -F_{ext} \hspace{2 mm} dx$. I'm having trouble ...
0
votes
4answers
168 views

Short-duration forces

In circular motion, it is said that the centripetal force acts only for a very very short period of time, hence is able to only change the direction but not magnitude of the velocity. Similarly in a ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Work done by Static friction

Here $v1$ is relative to the block on which sphere is pure rolling but static friction isn't $0$ as of now . In the following diagram, is work done by static friction $0$ ?, since the point of ...
2
votes
6answers
537 views

Centripetal Force Acceleration

In uniform circular motion, acceleration is $\frac{v^2}{r}$ and time which it acts $\rightarrow 0$. So $\Delta v = 0$, but then why/how does direction change, when the acceleration should be ...
-5
votes
4answers
686 views

Violation of Newton's Second Law (?) [closed]

Here the big circle denotes the circular path of a stone (small circle on path) tied to a string from the centre of the circular path. This is COMPLETELY HORIZONTAL At an instant the velocity in ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Work done by friction

Suppose we have a block of mass $M$ and we are moving it up a curve, very slowly ($a=0$). The surface is not smooth, and coefficient of friction is $\mu=\mu_s=\mu_k$. To move the block we apply a ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

How to understand the work-energy theorem?

How to understand the work-energy theorem? I took a short lecture on physics for engineering last week. The lecturer emphasized that the work done on an object will cause the kinetic energy change as ...
0
votes
1answer
138 views

Why work to change velocity from 0 to 20 km/h is less then from 20 to 40? [duplicate]

Imagine spaceship in vacuum with mass = 1. At beginning, it has velocity 0, and kinetic energy 0. $$W_1 = 0$$ Then, it turns on its engine, and changes velocity from 0 to 20 (delta v = 20). It's ...
1
vote
1answer
449 views

Work as an integral of mass over velocity?

As I've understood it, the area under $F$-$s$-graph is the work done, so then :$$W(s)=\int{F(s)ds}$$ I am also given this equation ($W_k$ is kinetic energy, which is equal the work done to set the ...
1
vote
2answers
801 views

Finding maximum speed in a work-energy problem

I have the following problem: The Royal Gorge bridge over the Arkansas River is $310\text{ m}$ above the river. A $57\text{ kg}$ bungee jumper has an elastic cord with an unstressed length of ...
3
votes
2answers
285 views

Find work done by force along a path - is parameterization the only way?

$F = x^3y^4 \hat i + x^4y^3 \hat j$ from $(0,0)$ to $(1,1)$. I am given different paths. For example, "first along x axis and then along the y axis" is one of the paths. Is this problem solvable ...
4
votes
3answers
169 views

When can one write $a=v \cdot dv/dx$?

Referring to unidimensional motion, it is obvious that it doesn't always make sense to write the speed as a function of position. Seems to me that this is a necessary condition to derive formulas ...
4
votes
2answers
144 views

Conservative Force and $1/r^2$

Does the inverse square law have anything to do with conservative behavior of the central forces?
1
vote
2answers
710 views

Work done in projectile motion

A projectile is shot at some inclination to the ground. It falls at another point having R distance from the initial point on the ground. Is there any work done? If initial velocity vector is $(u\cos ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Is the normal force a conservative force?

Most of the time the normal force doesn't do any work because it's perpendicular to the direction of motion but if it does do work, would it be conservative or non-conservative? For example, consider ...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

Work done by the air resistance [closed]

A ball of mass 0.37 kg is thrown upward along the vertical with a initial speed of 14 m / s, and reaches a maximum height of 8.4 m. a) What is the work done by air resistance on the ball? b) ...
0
votes
1answer
339 views

Is resistance to motion directly proportional to the speed of a moving object?

Power is known to be equal to the force x velocity (P=FV). Im solving a question that states the following : Car with engine working at 32 kW, mass of 1 tonne, travels at a constant speed of 40m/s ...
1
vote
2answers
523 views

Mechanics Question: Energy, Work and Power

I'm a pure mathematician by trade, and have been trying to teach myself A-level mechanics. (This is not homework, it is purely self-study.) I've been working through the exercises and have come up ...