The product of the force on an object and the displacement the object undergoes along the direction of the force.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
1answer
65 views

Work and chemical energy “paradox”

This is a mistake I've seen many people make, a few physicists included, but I haven't ever seen a satisfactory explanation for what's going on. Apologies for the lengthy setup. Setup Suppose I ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

On the work done by friction

The work done by friction is often calculated just as we would with any force. If we give a block of mass $m$ a velocity $v$ on a rough surface and it comes to rest after traversing a distance $x$, ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Work in gravitational field

I was doing a test a few days ago and there was a fairly simple task involving gravity basics. The task asks me to calculate the work done by moving an Earth's artificial satellite from a stationary ...
5
votes
1answer
56 views

Does an opposing force cause loss/ waste of energy?

I found this answer by John Rennie (in the question you see the train on a track): when the train moves a distance $d$ the work done on the train is $Fd\cos\theta$. It's certainly true that ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Work done by a gas in an expansion [duplicate]

1) Consider a gas expanding quasistatically and reversibly from $V_1$ to $V_2$ at constant temperature. I want to calculate the work done. So by convention work done by a system is a negative quantity ...
2
votes
2answers
45 views

How can tangential acceleration from a radial force be explained?

A mass is attached to a rope, and put into a circular motion. If I pull the string from the center, the tangential speed of the mass will increase (by conservation of angular momentum). I am ...
4
votes
3answers
623 views

Work = Force x Distance vs Displacement

The difference in using Distance vs Displacement is demonstrated in this example: Work = Force x Distance If I carry an object to and fro 10 metres, the work done would be Force x 20 metres. ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

A captious work problem: same paths but same forces?

A man jumps onto a chair. A man climbs onto a chair by putting a leg first and then the other. In both cases, the work has been the same. TRUE or FALSE...? Spoiler!: The path is the same, so the ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Efficiency of an electric motor? [closed]

Question: An electric motor runs off a 12V d.v. supply and has an overall efficiency of 75%. Calculate how much electric charge will pass through the motor when it does 90J of work. Can someone tell ...
3
votes
3answers
391 views

Why can't a magnet change a charged particle's speed?

I know that magnetic force acts perpendicular to the direction of the original velocity, so the velocity in that original direction is unchanged, but once the magnet starts acting, the particle's ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

Gravitational potential difference

in my revision guide it defines gravitational potential difference as: The gravitational potential difference is work done in moving a unit mass. It then goes on to explain the gravitational ...
0
votes
3answers
26 views

Dealing with negative work

Dumb question, I'm working with vector fields right now, and one question on here tells me to assume an object can take on three paths from a to b. (paths not listed here) for times in [0,1] Now ...
1
vote
4answers
52 views

The amount of potential energy at the height of h [duplicate]

When we lift an object upwards with a constant velocity for a distance of $ h $ the work that we've done is $mgh$ and the work done by the force of gravity is $-mgh$. So the net work on the object is ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Rigid body: internal work null?

I am following an elementary physics course book, namely W.E. Gettys, F.J. Keller and M.J. Skove's Physics (in an Italian translation). In exercises where no non-conservative force acts on a rigid ...
2
votes
2answers
65 views

Work done by frictional force on a sliding block

A block slides across a table horizontally with an initial velocity $V$. The frictional force $F$ brings it to rest after its Centre of Mass covers distance $S$. What is the work done by the ...
1
vote
3answers
74 views

Work-Energy conservation with friction

I didn't go to the lesson of work-energy theorem, so I miss something about this subject. I know the formulas, but I can't figure it out. This question has many quantities. Here is the problem, ...
1
vote
1answer
22 views

Deriving the equation for the speed of a block down an incline using work - keep getting the wrong constant

So the question is: There is a block of mass $m$ travelling along an incline that makes an angle $\theta$ with the horizontal. If the block is pushed up the incline with an initial velocity $v_o$, ...
0
votes
3answers
38 views

When moving from one position to another at a constant velocity, how does the conservation of energy hold?

I know that this might be a duplicate question, but I have not found any satisfactory answers that clear up my lack of understanding. Here is my question. Say a sloth hangs on a tree in the middle of ...
2
votes
2answers
68 views

Lack of rigour in usual derivation of Work-Energy Theorem

The derivation of the Work-Energy theorem usually goes as follows: You define the work done on a particle under net force $\vec{F}$ as $$W=\int\limits_C \vec{F}\cdot\mathrm{d}\vec{r}$$ And then you ...
0
votes
3answers
51 views

How much work do I need to convert 300ml of water from 25°C to 3°C? [closed]

A question on how to apply thermodynamics principles to figure out how much work is needed to hold 300ml water in room temperature at 3°C. So far I have: 1Cal for each degree per g of water. We have ...
0
votes
3answers
38 views

Work and energy

when a ball of mass m is brought with uniform velocity from infinity into the g field of the earth at a distance r from it, the potential energy of the ball earth system decreases from 0 to -GMm/r. ...
2
votes
1answer
151 views

How did Feynman prove that energy cannot be extracted from electric field?

In the Feynman Lectures, vol. II, chapter 4, Feynman discusses electric potential and says: If we carry a charge from point $a \to b$, $$W = -\int_{a}^{b} \mathbf{F} \cdot ds.$$ Now, in general, ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Help calculating work done by stretching a wire [closed]

A wire of length 0.89 m and cross-sectional area 1.7 cm2 is stretched elastically by an amount 1.2 cm. By Hooke’s law, the restoring force is $−k\Delta L$. Calculate the work done in ...
2
votes
5answers
223 views

How can static friction do work?

By definition, the work done by a force is $W = F\cdot d$, so how can static friction do work? Can this force move the body a distance of $75~\text{m}$?
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Constant 2 in kinetic energy equation [duplicate]

Trying to understand where the constant 2 comes from in the kinetic energy equation, $mv^2/2$. Why 2 and not another number?
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Work done by friction on car

David Morin, in "Introduction to Classical Mechanics" says that friction does not exert a force on a car because the ground is fixed but that KE of the car is changing to internal kinetic energy in ...
2
votes
5answers
313 views

when an object is lifted (at a constant velocity) shouldn't the work done on the object be zero? [duplicate]

When I lift an object from the ground (at a constant velocity) I'm applying force on the object equal to its weight and the earth is also pulling it downwards with equal amounts of force. So if the ...
2
votes
4answers
119 views

If velocity is constant, how can $p = F\cdot v$ be non zero?

If an airplane of mass $m$ is flying at a constant speed $v$, the power of the airplane is $$P = m\cdot v\cdot g $$ where $g$ is the acceleration of gravity and therefore: $$ F = m\cdot g, $$ but, ...
1
vote
2answers
52 views

Why am I getting that work it's always the same in both directions?

I'm studying electrostatic and I'm getting pretty frustrated because with the definition of work I'm getting that it's always positive and it doesn't make any sense. So here I have 2 positive ...
4
votes
1answer
52 views

Relativity of Work

Let's say there is a man pushing a wall with a force of $-1 \text N$, and moving it $0 \text m$. Since $W = F \cdot d$, he has done $0\text J$ of work on the wall. Another man is pushing a duck with ...
6
votes
3answers
655 views

Why should Conservative forces have their curl equal to zero?(intuition)

There are several conditions that must be met in order for a force to be conservative. One of them is that the curl of that force must be equal to zero? What is the physical intuition behind this? If ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Normal force, work and conservativity

I have searched very much on line, both in this site and elsewhere, but found no proof of whether the normal force is conservative or is not, in general. Clearly, if the force is orthogonal to the ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

The concept of displacement in definition of work

Suppose an ideal spring is attached to a wall at one of its end. Let an external force act on the spring at another end to stretch the spring to distance $x$. If spring constant is $k$ then work done ...
0
votes
1answer
105 views

When to use h = Cp∆T or u = Cv∆T

I'm getting myself confused on when to use h = cp∆T or u = cv∆T where cp is the specific ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

How much power does it take to keep a massive particle suspended in a gravitational field?

For instance if I have a rocket of mass $m$ in a uniform gravitational field $g$, and I want to keep it floating in the air via thrust alone, then how much power in the form of (say) chemical energy ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Use Work-KE Theorem? [closed]

I've been trying so long at this problem to no avail. I drew my free body diagram, but I'm unsure which formula to use. Could someone help me out?
0
votes
0answers
22 views

How is the Joule normalised?

Apologies if this question is a duplicate, I tried searching for this question both on Google and here, but was unable to find an answer. A Joule is defined in various ways, some of them being: ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Work needed to pump the balloons

Let's suppose that we want to pump the balloons underwater from the initial volume $V_0$ to the volume $V_1$. The pressure there equals $p_1$ and the atmospheric pressure is $p_0$. It is claimed ...
0
votes
2answers
60 views

How this formula for work follows from the definition?

If a particle moves along a path $\gamma : I\subset \mathbb{R}\to \mathbb{R}^3$ then the work done by a force $\mathbf{F}$ is defined by $$W = \int_{\gamma} \mathbf{F} = ...
2
votes
1answer
38 views

Does the line integral definition of Work involve distance or displacement?

My textbook reports the following definition of Work: where ds is the infinitesimal displacement. I know that an infinitesimal displacement is usually denoted by dr and I also know that the ...
0
votes
2answers
81 views

If an object rests on a table, not accelerating, how much work do both the object and the table do?

Obviously, the net work done is zero, because there's no motion, but is the proper way to look at it that both the object's gravity and the table's normal force do zero work, or that one does positive ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Integral limits when calculating the work

If I integrate $$dW= \vec{ F} \cdot d\vec{\ell}$$ which are the limits? In $$\int\limits_{W_{inf}}^{W_{sup}}dW= \int\limits_{\vec{\ell}_{1}}^{\vec{\ell}_{2}} \vec{ F} \cdot d\vec{\ell}$$ it is ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Which is the right sign convention for the potential difference?

The circulation of the electric field gives the potential difference, but is it : $$V_B-V_A = \int_A^B\vec{E}.\vec{dOM} \hspace{1.5cm} (1)$$ or $$V_B-V_A = - \int_A^B\vec{E}.\vec{dOM} \hspace{1cm} ...
2
votes
2answers
84 views

Where does this formula for sagging of a beam come from?

In one of my physics textbooks there is a chapter on the elasticity of materials which contains pretty basic outline about Young's modulus, stress-strain, elastic potential energy and related stuff. ...
0
votes
3answers
53 views

How work theoretically is zero, when person did do work while covering a distance then returning it?

$W = Fd$, meaning if a body moved a distance, say $3 m$, and returns, its distance will be zero and work will be zero. I do understand it mathematically and graphically but can someone explain it to ...
-2
votes
3answers
70 views

Given Force in vector form, how do I find work done? [closed]

A force of $F=\hat i+2\hat j-3\hat k$ is applied to a particle that moves 10 meters in the direction of $\hat i+\hat j$. How much work is done?
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Meaning the symbol, $W$ and $dW$

What's the difference between $W$ and $dW$? They are both work done and have similar formulae (same dimension). But I don't know the difference between them. $dW$ here ISN'T power.
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Given an initial push, is work done on an object infinite in a hypothetical empty universe?

Consider a hypothetical empty universe containing a single object. Given an initial push, will the work done by the forever moving object be infinite?
3
votes
0answers
57 views

How much work can a single grain of rice do? [closed]

I found a website saying a grain of rice contains 1/10 kcal. I'm not a physicist and haven't done maths for a long time. But here's what I came up with: E = m * g * h One small calorie equals ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Why does the gravitation potential in a uniform field have negative values?

As we know the gravitational potential is the work done per unit mass in taking a point mass from zero potential (at infinity distance) to a point in a gravitational field. But why is the work ...