one of the four known fundamental forces of nature and the one responsible for beta-decay radioactivity. The weak interaction is very short-ranged and more weakly coupled than either the strong nuclear force or electromagnetism. At energy scales above the Z mass the weak and electromagnetic ...

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What is weak interaction? I need easy and short answer

What is weak interaction? I need easy and short answer. I can't understand the definition of weak force. Why is it so difficult? Bosons, Mesons, Fermions, parity etc. Why the fundamental force is ...
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96 views

Are there analogs to resistance, inductance, capacitance, and memristance connecting the weak force to electromagnetism?

A question was asked over at EE.SE recently which I tried to answer, but much of my answer was speculative. I'm hoping someone here can help my ignorance. In electronics design, there are four ...
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23 views

What were the immediate consequences Yang-Lee work on Weak Interaction?

I am studying the history of Modern Physics and Yang-Lee earned their Nobel the next year after the Cobalt experiments. I am familiar with the chronology, but am not clear what those findings meant to ...
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55 views

Weak decays classification

Sir, We often read about Cabibbo Favourite, Singly Cabibbo Suppressed and Doubly Cabibbo Suppressed decays. I have two questions: I understand that the suppressed decays are rarer but why are ...
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186 views

Charged pion decay and spin conservation

Charged pions $\pi^\pm$ decay via an intermediate $W$ to (e.g.) a lepton-neutrino pair. The pions being scalar (spin-0) particles and the intermediate $W$ having spin 1, how is spin conserved in ...
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196 views

Can the mass of longitudinal and transverse W bosons be measured separately?

Some higgsless unified models of particle physics predict that the mass of longitudinally polarized W bosons and the mass of transversely polarized W bosons are different. In those models, a ...
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114 views

Fermi theory of beta decay

What are the facts that one should consider and incorporate in going from non-relativistic Fermi theory of beta decay to its relativistic generalization? In other words, how would the Lagrangian or ...
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48 views

The difference between Z boson couplings for quarks and antiquarks

I am trying to work out the difference between Z boson couplings for quarks and antiquarks. I know that for quarks the Z has the following couplings: $Z_u^- = \frac{1}{\cos \theta_w}(0.5 - ...
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110 views

Why does the electron energy distribution from muon decay peak near the kinematic maximum?

I'm trying to understand why when you have a muon decay event, the energy of the electron peaks near the maximum kinematically allowed value. Is there an intuitive explanation for why this is the case ...
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25 views

How does the weak force between two neutrinos compare with their gravitational interaction?

In short, are there cases where the weak interaction between two neutrinos is actually smaller, in (absolute) magnitude, than their gravitational interaction? There is no principle that forbids this. ...
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47 views

chirality oscillations in weak interaction

As far as I have understood, the mass $m$ of a fermion causes a coupling of the both chiralities $\psi_L$ and $\psi_R$. This coupling would induce an oscillation of the chirality within a time scale ...
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209 views

Weak isospin and types of weak charge

My understanding is that QCD has three color charges that are conserved as a result of global SU(3) invariance. What about SU(2) weak? Does it have two types of charges? What I'm getting at is: U(1) ...