Waves are disturbances that propagate through space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Why is TV remote's infrared wave shown by a camera as purple light, why not red or something else?

I've always seen that all the old model remotes that is used in DVD players or TVs, it emits electromagnetic waves, having wavelenth somewhere in the Infrared region. But when my phone's average ...
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64 views

What boundary conditions in a wave simulation would avoid reflections?

In simulating an elastic medium as a series of mobile points connected by ideal springs, it's straightforward to model conditions corresponding to a fixed endpoint, which results in an incoming wave ...
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Linear vs. quadratic dispersion relation

In wave mechanics the dispersion relation between frequency $\omega$ and wave number $k$ is linear: $$\omega_n=c k_n$$ But in quantum mechanics, based on Schrödinger's equation, one can show that we ...
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Why can we leave off half of the general solution?

In these pdf notes, it says at the bottom of the first page and beginning of the second: [...] whose solution is: $$\Psi(\theta) = c_1 e^{i\omega\theta} + c_2 e^{-i\omega\theta}$$ Since we are ...
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Can a wave possess spin?

Since a matter wave is associated with a particle in quantum mechanics, does the wave spins? I mean, can we visualize the spinning of wave or is it possible that the wave spins?
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Do mechanical waves travel in straight lines?

Electromagnetic waves travel in straight lines but do all waves travel in straight lines?
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Differences of waves in water and air

When one drops a pebble in a body of water, one can observe multiple waves emanating from the point the pebble came in contact with water. Be it because the water "jumps" up and comes back down, ...
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Confused over complex representation of the wave

My quantum mechanics textbook says that the following is a representation of a wave traveling in the +$x$ direction:$$\Psi(x,t)=Ae^{i\left(kx-\omega t\right)}\tag1$$ I'm having trouble visualizing ...
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Speed of sound in an inifinitely dense medium

Curious thought i just had. The speed of sound is affected by a few factors, but the density plays a large role. As density increases, does this mean that sound could approach the speed of light? If ...
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98 views

How does a fixed amount of transmitted radio energy supply an unknown number of destinations?

I did some maths and physics up to the age of 18, and hold an amateur radio licence. This thing has puzzled me for a while - does reception of an electromagnetic wave imply an interaction with the ...
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Can wifi signal reception be improved by opening a door? [closed]

Use Case A wifi user is in a different room than the router. The computer is having a hard time connecting and receiving the wifi signal. Engineering Question Can the wifi signal from the router to ...
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108 views

Why don't constant motion charges produce waves?

I'm a little confused about the origin of electromagnetic waves. Although I can understand their origin mathematically, I get a little confused about the physical intuition of... Information ...
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125 views

Can a standing wave form on a string with both end open

I am fascinated with an idea of an standing wave forming on a string with both end open. If we assume two identical waves coming in of an infinitely long string then for a short period of time, they ...
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87 views

What, if anything, makes primary colours distinct?

I've recently become interested in the primary colours; red, green and blue. In my capacity as a computer programmer I'm well aware of how these colours are used practically, and of how varying ...
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645 views

What happens to waves when they hit smaller apertures than their wavelenghts?

I was wondering this for quite a long time now. Let's say you have a water wave (like ripples, not the ones you see during tsunamis) with wavelength 10 m. Imagine you put a boundary with an opening of ...
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424 views

Double-Slit Experiment Separation Between Fringes

I was taught in class that the double slit diffraction pattern would always have bright fringes of same length. We derived the formula: $y=m(\lambda)(L)/d$, which also shows this equal distance. I ...
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254 views

Huygen's principle in curved spacetimes

Does Huygen's principle hold in even dimensional (2m+1,1) curved spacetimes, or are there certain necessary conditions for it to hold? In other words, if I have Cauchy data for a field satisfying the ...
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Do Electromagnetic Waves really propagate through continuous Induction?

I've often seen it said that in an Electromagnetic Wave the changing Electric Field component creates the Magnetic Field Component and the changing Magnetic Field Component in turn creates an Electric ...
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550 views

Pendulum Wave Period

Recently I've seen various videos showing the pendulum wave effect. All of the videos which I have found have a pattern which repeats every $60\mathrm{s}$. I am trying to work out the relationship ...
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307 views

Normal modes of a flexible rod clamped at only one point

I am interested in the vibrations of a thin, flexible rod that would only be clamped at one point, properly I'd like to calculate its eigenvalue. But the way I learned it in wave mechanics doesn't ...
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559 views

Can wind blowing on smooth water create speckle interference patterns?

On a calm smooth lake, or even a large rain puddle, I've seen transient rough patches on the surface suddenly appear and disappear, and sometimes move across the water some distance before ...
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Why can't light pass through walls but sound can?

When I sit in a room I can hear voices coming from the adjacent room but the light in adjacent room does not enter my room i.e. sound waves travels through the wall but light waves can't. Why?
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Why is there a 90˚ phase angle between particle velocity and sound pressure in spherical waves?

My text says that in a plane sound wave (or in the far field), particle velocity and pressure is in phase. As we move closer to the sound source (to near field and more spherical waves), the phase ...
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418 views

What is the dominant cause for ocean waves at a beach?

What is the dominant cause for ocean waves at a beach? Are they the result of wind/pressure difference? If so, the waves do seem to exist in similar intensity even during relative quiet times of the ...
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116 views

Do individual rays of light lose energy via the inverse square law?

We've all heard of the inverse square law, but apparently that refers to the flux or intensity or number of photons hitting an imaginary surface area. This is not exactly what I want to ask about. ...
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58 views

Refraction, diffraction or reflection of human voice

Why is possible to hear in an open space someone's voice even if he's not facing me? Is it because of refraction, diffraction or reflection of the sound wave?
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Interference and windows

The other day i was learning about interference patterns with the effect of a bubble making a rainbow on the surface. I learned that the reflections from both sides of the soap can interfere ...
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907 views

Longitudinal Waves - how velocity varies with density

The formula for finding the velocity of a longitudinal wave, such as a sound wave, is: $$v = \sqrt{\frac{E}{\rho}}$$ Where $v$ represents the velocity, $E$ represents the elasticity of the medium, and ...
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Sea surfer position displacement

Waves are means by which the energy propagates through a medium (e.g., sea water). This is not associated with a net movement of water in the direction of wave propagation. If this is the case, then ...
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Relationship between slit size and wavelength in diffraction

Almost in every book on physics we can find a statement like "diffraction gets stronger when the size of the slit is comparable to the wavelength". Let's say we have a wall in a bathtub with a slit in ...
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796 views

Does thin film interference (anti-reflective coating) let more light through?

The theory of an anti-reflective coating is that the reflected light off the coating and the reflected light off the substrate is 180 degrees out of phase, causing destructive interference and ...
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How is a one position shift of an interferometer fringe pattern defined?

When Michelson and Morley conducted their 1887 interferometer experiment, they were expecting a fringe pattern shift of 0.4 (see the chart at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelson-Morley_experiment). ...
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109 views

The Effects of Moving Matter Across Light-Year distances

If I were to stand at one end of a light-year long metal pole, and another person were to stand one light-year away at the other end, and then I were to push on my end of the pole. How long would it ...
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550 views

How to predict sea waves length/height?

I would like to know which are the best methods used to predict sea waves characteristics (particularly predict length/height given water depth and wind speed) and how are they used. My major is ...
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Interference of EM Waves with Orbital Angular Momentum

If you have two coherent collinear e-m beams of same frequency and polarization, but 180 degrees out of phase, they will destructively interfere. If you introduce orbital angular momentum of L=3 ...
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reproducing double-slit experiment with sunlight

Is it possible to reproduce Double-slit experiment at home with sunlight probably in a larger scale? Thanks for all the answers (and special thanks to Chris for the effort),so i understand that it ...
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170 views

Velocity profile of a viscously damped wave

For a test case, I want to determine the velocity profile of a viscously damped standing wave. By linearizing the density ($\rho=\rho_0+\rho'$) and velocity ($ux=ux'$), the continuity and ...
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87 views

Why do some types of waves disperse?

We know that some mediums/waves are non-dispersive such as air for sound waves, and waves on a string. But, why do some waves, for example deep water waves, disperse? I am trying to understand the ...
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Diffraction of matter waves

By considering the De Broglie wavelength of particles, we discover that matter can diffract if passed through openings with itself. This poses a variety of questions, namely Can matter waves ...
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180 views

Solution of the wave equation [closed]

I am dealing with the solution of the wave equation in two different cases represented in figure by Case A and Case B. The two figures were obtained by shining a slab with an incident wave coming from ...
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100 views

Must flow be supersonic for disturbances not to affect upstream?

I'm studying oil production and found a fact that puzzled me. It states that fluid flow downstream of the wellhead must be supercritical in order not to disturb the flow upstream of it. From ...
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Can we measure the depth of water by scattering water?

Suppose we release an object and make it fall on the surface of water, then the scatter of water is recorded, Taking some observations, can we calculate the depth of the water by analyzing the ...
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Group Velocity and Phase Velocity of Matter Wave?

In quantum mechanics, what is the difference between group velocity and phase velocity of matter wave? How can it also be that phase velocity of matter wave always exceeds the speed of light?
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1D Wave mechanics (string)

Suppose I have a wave traveling to the right described by $e^{iw(t-{x\over c})}$. (It obeys the 1D wave equation). AND at $x=0$, there is a mass $M$ fixed to the string such that we have $M{d^2y\over ...
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How to calculate dispersion relation from a Finite Difference (FD) wave simulation

I have a python code that calculates the solution of the inhomogeneous acoustic wave equation for a 2D medium with any velocity and source configuration. It was implemented using Finite Differences ...
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290 views

Why doesn't a backward wave exist? [duplicate]

Huygens principle says every point of wavefront emit wavelet in all directions. Then why does a back ward wave not exist? Can any expert tell real answer? On different sites I get different and ...
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123 views

The logarithmic decay of WIFI

I have been told that Wi-Fi, LTE etc signal strength fall of as $$\propto \frac1{\log(r)}$$ where $r$ is the distance. I am wondering why this is. I better explain what I mean with this question. ...
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74 views

The Frequency of a Trill

My music teacher recently pointed out to me that, when performing a trill (alternating between two notes very quickly) the finger for the higher note should be placed slightly lower on the string than ...
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Mathematical defintion of a standing wave? [closed]

I know that a standing wave is the superposition of two waves of equal amplitude and wavelength, moving in opposite directions. But I am looking for a more mathematical defintion of such a wave. The ...
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Wave packet in curved spacetime

It is known that the classical equation of motion for a scalar field wave packet on a curved spacetime background gives the geodesic trajectory (the e.o.m. is $(\nabla_\mu \nabla^\mu + m^2) \Phi=0$). ...