Waves are disturbances that propagate throush space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Gerstner Wave Formula to Vertex information $(x,y,z)$

I have created a program, that draws a plane mesh, and allows to me edit or animate all the separate vertices along it. The idea behind it, is for me to be able to create a gridMesh based wave ...
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96 views

Beginner Physics - Explaining longitudinal waves

I am having difficulty grasping the concept of a longitudinal wave. My textbook definition "In longitudinal waves, the vibration is backwards and forwards in the direction of motion of the wavefront" ...
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56 views

Mechanical pulse reflection

When we have a rope with one fixed end and we send a pulse through it, the reflected pulse is inverted. My question is as follows - is it correct to say that near the end (when the pulse hits the ...
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23 views

Help with Hologram problem [duplicate]

Can someone help me out with a simple yet interesting 3D hologram related problem and solution, which can help me understand the subject and then teach the subject to a group of students.
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1answer
252 views

Simple Harmonic Motion Question - Block on Platform [closed]

A platform is executing SHM in a vertical direction with an amplitude of $5$ cm and a frequency of $\frac{10}{\pi}$ vibrations per second. A block is placed on the platform at the lowest point of its ...
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95 views

Inverse of the D’Alembert wave operator

Let $f(x)$ a solution of the wave equation $\square f(x) = 0$. I don't understand why the following operator $$ \mathcal{D} \equiv \frac{1}{2}(\nabla^2)^{-1} (x_0\partial_0 - C) $$ for arbitrary ...
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50 views

Wave equation in varying mediums

I recently stumbled upon the above image describing partial transmittance, and was wondering what sort of equation would model such a wave propagating through varying mediums. Is there also an ...
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1answer
829 views

Relationship between slit size and wavelength in diffraction

Almost in every book on physics we can find a statement like "diffraction gets stronger when the size of the slit is comparable to the wavelength". Let's say we have a wall in a bathtub with a slit in ...
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115 views

A theory about a travelling wave due to a vibrating rope seems to be contradictory, please spot what is wrong?

Consider a travelling wave produced by vibrating one end of a rope while the other end is made to freely move along a vertical line. Mathematically, the equation of the traveling wave that also ...
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240 views

Wave Function for a Sinusoidal Wave (Why minus sign?)

I was trying to understand how the wave function for a sinusoidal wave was derived, but did not understand one specific sign, the minus sign in the following formula: $$y(x,t) = A \sin(k x – \omega t ...
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79 views

How can one calculate the distance a particular sound will travel?

What do you need and how to calculate a distance traveled by sound? For example if you hit a bell with a specific amount of power how far will it travel?
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1answer
106 views

SIngle slit diffraction and location of dark spots

In single slit diffraction, why (according to the equation for $\theta$) do successive dark spots exist at whole number intervals ($n=1,2,3, \ldots$) and not half? The correct path difference for ...
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1answer
157 views

Electron and photon collision

So electron moving left ($v_{initial}=0.8c$) collides into photon going right. After the collision electron is moving to right ($v_{after}=0.6c$) and the photon is moving to left. What is the ...
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1answer
54 views

Can there exist a Wave which changes the quantum states of particles?

i'm a high school student and i was reading about electromagnetic waves and how they transport energy and that the electric and magnetic fields sustain each other. I have also read about longitudinal ...
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2answers
724 views

Why does noise affect FM radio less than AM?

Frequency modulated waves are less susceptible to noise compared to amplitude modulated signal. This is because the information in an FM signal is transmitted through varying the frequency, and not ...
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241 views

Why do waves diffract?

There have already been a lot of questions on this site on diffraction but I still believe this one might be slightly different. In electromagnetic waves, diffraction and any other phenomenon of wave ...
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250 views

Why are two independent sources incoherent?

Coherent sources are produced from a single parent source. But, why are two independent sources always incoherent? Two sources can produce light of the same frequency. Then, I guess the problem is ...
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42 views

Collapse of wave function

Can the collapse of a quantum mechanical state in general into one the eigenstates of an observable whenever its measurement is made written mathematically? If yes, how?
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82 views

What does (simple) $j/cm^2$ represent AND how does this result $6.959j/cm^2$? [closed]

According to the image shown below, this specific Laser Hair Treatment device claims that it has a concentration of $6.959 j/cm^2$. So far by research I have found that it needs around $6\mbox{ to }7 ...
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1answer
34 views

Diffraction from interatomic spacing

In diffraction from a single slit, we learn that the angular width of the central maxima, is given by $2\sin^{-1}\frac \lambda d$. For $d\approx \lambda$, the incoming wavefront should be spread to ...
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1answer
232 views

How far do air particles move when a sound wave passes through them?

How far do air particles move when a sound wave passes through them? I know that they don't actually travel, the question is how far do they oscillate or what is the physical amplitude of the ...
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294 views

Why do we calculate energy by integrate the Signal squared?

What's the interesting thing in the square of a signal? I know integrating gave us the sum of the differentiated energies, but why the Energy is the square of the signal?
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2answers
270 views

Do electromagnetic waves always move in straight lines?

When we send an electromagnetic short wave to the sky, it reflects due to the ionosphere effects. But if we send it horizontally, is it correct that it moves around the surface of the earth, and if it ...
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1answer
206 views

Could submarine SONAR kill a diver?

Could a diver swimming next to a submarine be killed or seriously injured by its SONAR? What physical aspect of SONAR affects the human body in a potential harmful way?
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1answer
137 views

Infinite potential square well solutions

My question is about understanding the different solutions of the potential square well. Imagine a square well defined this way: $$ V(x) = \begin{cases} ∞&\,{\rm if} x<0 \\ 0&\,{\rm ...
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78 views

Symmetry of wave pulse

How can one decide whether a wave pulse is symmetrical by looking at its equation? $$y(x,t)=\frac{0.8}{[4x+5t]^2} $$ represents a moving pulse will it be symmetric?
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3answers
185 views

How to calculate Standing Waves in Electrical Cables?

I have a 20 metre Coaxial Cable. I send digital signals down the cable ranging from 5 KHz to 50 KHz. I have noticed a pattern in the noise ratio, an oscillating wave. I predict this is to do with ...
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1answer
284 views

Can a macroscopic body have wavelength as that of electron? [duplicate]

Einstein has suggested that light can behave as a wave as well as like a particle i.e, it has dual character. In 1924, de-Broglie suggested that just as light exhibits wave and particle properties, ...
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183 views

cause of maximum kinetic energy and elastic potential energy at the same point of a transverse wave in a string

Suppose a string element oscillating transversely in SHM having both kinetic energy and elastic potential energy travels with velocity $u$. Let $y(m)$ be the amplitude. When it reaches $y(0)$, it has ...
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159 views

Is it possible to estimate the speed of wind by the sound emitted by a cable of an overhead power line?

I was near ($\approx40m$) an overhead power line and I heard a sound coming from the cables of the power line; I think the sound was made by the vibrations of the power cables due to the wind but I am ...
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1answer
441 views

Can electron exist as a standing wave inspite of successive superposition?

With the development of quantum mechanics, it was found that the orbiting electrons around a nucleus could not be fully described as particles, but needed to be explained by the wave-particle duality. ...
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89 views

Diffraction of sound

The sound waves, by the virtue of it being a wave, shows diffraction and interference. But in diffraction, I learnt that if the wave is allowed to enter through a small aperture, there is a central ...
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3answers
186 views

Can we explain Huygen's principle taking into account Maxwell's predictions?

Descartes gave the corpuscular model (1637) of light. Corpuscular model was further developed by Issac Newton. Model predicted that if the ray light (on refraction) bends towards the normal then the ...
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3answers
127 views

Do electromagnetic waves have endpoints?

When learning about electromagnetic waves at school we never talked about any endpoints as we did with standing waves, so I assumed that light has an endless length, but that doesn't make sense. So my ...
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1answer
67 views

How does a transverse wave propogate in a medium?

I have been told that trasverse wave propogates by the oscillation of medium particles in direction perpendicular to propogation. Consider a wave on a taught string (x-y plane). What is the ...
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60 views

Rijke tube: Why Sound is maximum when heated 1/4th length from bottom of tube

Why is it that the maximum sound coming from a Rijke tube happens only when heated wire gauze is placed at 1/4th the length of the tube from the bottom. According to Rayleigh: If heat be ...
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104 views

Frequency shift without affecting signal length

Non-physicist here. From what I've learned in university and what common sense says, a shift in frequency of a signal results in a change in its length in time. For example, if a sinusoid signal of ...
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2answers
154 views

Diffraction by a lens

The fraunhoffer treatment of circular apertures yields a diffraction pattern of circles, with the first minimum (dark ring) at an angular radius of $\theta$ where $\sin(\theta)=1.22\lambda/b$, where ...
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1answer
196 views

Would there be emf induced in our body due to electromagnetic radiations?

The experiments of innovative Faraday and Joseph Henry in USA, conducted around 1830, demonstrated conclusively that electric currents were induced in closed coils when subjected to changing magnetic ...
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183 views

Why do light disappears the moment we switch off the source (inside the wooden box)?

I am failing to explain why light won't remain inside the wooden box in the following situation. I considered a wooden box closed from all the sides, with a bulb inside it. If we switch on the bulb, ...
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2answers
461 views

Fresnel distance and Geometrical limit

I read about the geometrical limit of wave theory. The source from where I read had a slightly different explanation to provide than here(The more rigorous answer is too complicated for me to ...
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1answer
156 views

Diffracton at the edges of an opaque object?

To understand the phenomenon of diffraction as an interference effects of several dipole oscillators (like in case of several symmetrical, not sawtooth, scratches in a diffraction grating), we ...
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205 views

Does brightness of the light remains constant with the variation of the distance with respect to the source in vaccum?

I have this question going in my mind from many days, i.e why brightness of light emitted from any light source around us decreases with distance? The brightness of light from tube light, streetlight, ...
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132 views

An analogy for resonance?

I learned that the phenomena of resonance occurs when the frequency of the applied force is equal to the natural frequency of an object. At this point, an object vibrates with maximum amplitude. How ...
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2answers
122 views

How to be sure that a He-Ne laser light is monochromatic

How can I be sure that the emission of a He-Ne laser contains only one single mode of laser cavity? The only thing that I know is that if I use a diffraction grating and the light isn't ...
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299 views

Are pure mechanical evanescent waves possible?

Consider a lattice of massive points connected by harmonic springs, with zero or periodic boundary conditions. If we make a repeating pattern of $N$ varying masses, the system will have $N$ bands of ...
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1answer
152 views

Why does a light wave invert at a boundary with greater index of refraction?

Is there a reason why a EM wave reflects invertedly when it meets a boundary point with a greater index of refraction. In the case of ropes, if remember correctly, the reason why it inverts is to ...
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2answers
80 views

Third order optical mixing

It's pretty straight-forward to visualise second-order non-linear optical mixing processes in which two waves of frequencies $\omega_{1}$ and $\omega_{2}$ mix up to generate new waves of different ...
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80 views

Question about the shape of the waves [closed]

What is the molecular level reason behind the pattern (sine function) of the waves?
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549 views

Theory behind patterns formed on Chladni plates?

In this video of vibrating Chladni plates we can see small sand particles align themselves into different interesting patterns (also shown in the image below) which correspond to some particular ...