Waves are disturbances that propagate throush space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Does interference take place only in waves parallel to each other?

The title says it all but I will add some details. I believe that interference takes place only in waves which are parallel to each other. See the picture to understand what I mean by parallel. We ...
4
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2answers
124 views

Why are two voices singing the same note louder than one?

Let's say for example: Two people sing the same note (frequency) and volume (amplitude) together. Why is it that the two persons sound louder than they would ...
3
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2answers
42 views

Why a minus in the equation of a paraxial plane wave?

paraxial plane wave = $\exp{(-jkz)}$ for waves propagating to the right I can't figure out why it's not $\exp{(+jkz)}$. Any help would be greatly appreciated, thank you.
3
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2answers
89 views

Locations of destructive interference for two spherical waves

I have looked at this, but it did not help with locations. Really this just comes down to mathematical manipulation, which for some reason I fail to see. Here is my paraphrased setup: Consider two ...
1
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0answers
58 views

Number of wave modes in a cavity

I'm trying to calculate the number of acoustic modes that can exist in a room in a certain range of frequencies. I thought of using the Rayleigh-Jeans formula for the electromagnetic standing wave ...
3
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3answers
101 views

When polarized light hits a polarizer, what happens to the polarization which is not transmitted?

It is typically said that in polarization of light only those waves can pass through a polaroid which has a plane of vibration parallel to the axis of polaroid. My question is: what happens to the ...
7
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1answer
203 views

Are small speakers inherently limited to higher frequencies?

I am hoping to build a subwoofer using multiple smaller speakers (165mm) instead of a single larger speaker (380mm). My theory is that the displaced air volume is what matters, not the individual ...
1
vote
1answer
174 views

How to calculate loss due to Gaussian beam divergence of a laser going through multiple lenses?

To better explain my question, I will need to give a brief description of the configuration used in 2D MEMS switches. So, the next figure shows a configuration of a 2D MEMS switch, a light beam ...
7
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1answer
206 views

Is the existence of electromagnetic standing waves dependent on the observers reference frame?

If I take two plane EM waves travelling in opposite direction e.g. $E = E_0 \sin(kx-\omega t)$ and $E=E_o \sin (kx + \omega t)$, they sum to give a standing wave with a time-averaged Poynting vector ...
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0answers
57 views

Can anyone outline the theory of plane wave Born approximation for direct nuclear reactions in detail?

Can anyone outline the theory of plane wave Born approximation for direct nuclear reactions in detail? Also What are the modification introduced in the distorted wave Born approximation? I was ...
12
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2answers
605 views

First-order wave equation: Why is its presence not common?

The (one-dimensional) wave equation is the second-order linear partial differential equation $$\frac{\partial^2 f}{\partial x^2}=\frac{1}{v^2}\frac{\partial^2 f}{\partial t^2}\tag{second order PDE}$$ ...
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2answers
212 views

How do the particles in a standing wave vibrate in phase within half a wavelength?

I would like to have a better understanding of phase difference when talking about stationary waves. How exactly are particles in phase within half a wavelength in a stationary wave?
3
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1answer
97 views

Why is the water on one side of a bridge choppy?

My daily commute take me across the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge on Lake Washington. I have noticed on several occasions that the water on the southern side of the bridge will be quite choppy ...
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3answers
223 views

How could electromagnetic waves propagate through space although they have no electrons?

How could electric fields in these waves propagate through space although in space there's no electrons for the electric field to be formed? is there another type of charged particles that carry the ...
0
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0answers
48 views

Why in 2+1 spacetime dimensions electromagnetic wave (light) cannot be distinguished with acoustic wave (mechanical wave)?

I have heard a saying that in 2+1 spacetime dimensions electromagnetic wave cannot be distinguished with acoustic wave. Or maybe they want to say in 2+1 spacetime dimensions photon and phonon cannot ...
3
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1answer
271 views

Why do we must initially assume that the wavefunction is complex?

The sound waves are real, and they can interfere, so corresponding apparat may be used in quantum mechanics. We also may use the time dependence in a form of orthogonal matrix multiplying the initial ...
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1answer
52 views

What are the the characteristics of a standing wave? [closed]

May someone explain #24 from this picture? B is apparently the correct answer. Can any of the other answers be correct here? Isn't D also correct?
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1answer
93 views

Does the transmission axis matter for sending polarized light through polarized glass?

If I have polarized light and I send through only one polarized glass plane, does the transmission axis matter, or will the intensity be halved no matter what.
0
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2answers
275 views

Deriving group velocity formula

A formula for the group velocity of waves is: $u=k*dv/dk + v$ But then, since $k=2π/λ$, this equation can be rewritten as: $u=v-dv/dλ*λ$ But how? My attempt: $k*dv/dk$ = $((2π/λ)*dv/d(2π/λ)$ ...
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1answer
27 views

Differentiate wave speed, don't understand

The speed $v$ of some wave is $ω/k$ and I want to differentiate this with respect to $k$. Apparently this equals: $dv/dk = d(ω/k)/dk-ω/k^2$ But I don't understand why. Isn't this just saying "the ...
2
votes
3answers
86 views

What is sound in terms of acoustic sources?

Sound is nothing more than small amplitude, unsteady pressure perturbations that propagate as a longitudinal wave from a region in space which created it (called the source region) into a quiescent ...
0
votes
1answer
100 views

Help deriving the general linear wave equation $d^2y/dx^2=(1/v^2)d^2y/dt^2$ [closed]

How do I derive the General Linear Wave Equation $$d^2y/dx^2=(1/v^2)d^2y/dt^2?$$ My teacher differentiated the general wave function $f(x + vt)+g(x - vt)$ twice with respect to both variables to get ...
2
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0answers
39 views

What is the longest distance over which echolocation is effective?

Some animals, most notably bats, use echolocation in order to navigate and detect the location and size of objects and prey. This usually takes place over short distances. What are the theoretical ...
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0answers
36 views

Photons are packets of electromagnetic radiation (wave) what about other particles? [duplicate]

Photons are packets of electromagnetic radiation (wave), what about other particles? Are other particles, say electrons, really just packets of waves?
2
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1answer
84 views

How is it possible for light to be a wave and a particle? [duplicate]

I have always been interested in Physics, and lots of people say that light is a particle and a wave. How is it possible? How can a photon (a light particle) be a wave as well, when its a particle? ...
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1answer
49 views

Standing sound wave tube

If there was a standing sound wave tube and a flammable gas was introduced then ignited, would the combustion be more forceful and more efficient since its following a standing wave, than just a gas ...
3
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1answer
81 views

Quantum Excitations

In the context of quantum mechanics, is the Schrödinger equation actually describing some sort of an actual wave in some field like light in EM field ? So all particles are actually waves in their ...
2
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2answers
148 views

Why is sound intensity proportional to the square of sound pressure not to sound pressure alone?

I am trying to understand the physical principles behind the sound intensity and sound pressure. As far as i know, sound intensity is proportionate to the squared sound pressure. Can someone explain ...
2
votes
1answer
153 views

Red color has largest wavelenght and violet minimum (in the range of visible light). then why does violet light appears reddish? RED + BLUE = VIOLET [duplicate]

My question is simple. Green light is more similar to red light than violet, then why is violet reddish and green not? in the language of frequencies and wavelengths, red and violet should contrast ...
5
votes
2answers
173 views

what determines the wavelength of waves on the open ocean?

Looking at the picture below, you can totally see that these are tiny boats. The water is practically washing over the hull of these boat models. But the water has boundaries that are very far ...
0
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0answers
23 views

Learning about group velocity, phase velocity and particle velocity [duplicate]

I am studying quantum physics and I would like to know a bit more in detail about group velocity, particle velocity and phase velocity. Can you guys suggest some books/online resources where I can ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Prove EM Waves Are Transverse In Nature

Why we say that EM waves are transverse in nature? I have seen some proofs regarding my question but they all calculate flux through imaginary cube. Here is My REAL problem that I can't here imagine ...
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1answer
38 views

Conduction and propagation [duplicate]

What is the difference between conduction of electric wave in conductor and propagation of electromagnetic wave in dielectric? Why propagation term is used for dielectric and conduction for ...
2
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0answers
33 views

Math formula for crystal glass resonance [duplicate]

For a music therapy experiment, I have to use several crystal glasses with water and different cylindrical shapes, and make them vibrate and produce different sounds. Is there a math formula that ...
2
votes
1answer
240 views

How is the width of a slit related to the intemsity of light passing through it?

Here's a question I got in my final exam this morning. "If in a Young's double slit experiment setup, the ratio of intensity of the bright spot to the dark spot is 25:9, what is the ratio of the width ...
2
votes
1answer
343 views

Derivation of Green's Function for Wave Equation

In the textbook Modern Methods in Analytical Acoustics (Crighton-1992) the following relates the 3D Green's function in the time-domain to the frequency domain g(x-y): I cannot see how the ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Query regarding interference

In Young's Double Slit experiment, why is it that two waves vibrating perpendicular to each other doesn't show interference? I know that for interference to happen, the waves must be coherent ( i.e., ...
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2answers
3k views

What is the fringe separation in Young's double slit experiment?

In the double slit experiment, a pattern of dark and bright bands appears on the screen. Is the fringe separation the distance between two bright bands? Question: In a double slit experiment ...
0
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1answer
83 views

Help in understanding the derivation for Fresnel Distance?

An Aperture of size $a$ illuminated by a parallel beam sends diffracted beam (the central maxima) in angular width approximately $λ/a$. Travelling a distance $z$, it aquires the width $zλ/a$ due to ...
0
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2answers
103 views

Why are radio waves in the 1.43 - 2.5 Mhz range invisible?

Visible light diapason is 400 - 700 nm which is 1.43 - 2.5 Mhz. If using an antenna I would broadcast steady sinusoidal wave in this range, why the EM emitted by the antenna are not visible? Suppose ...
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0answers
63 views

Fresnel's explanation of rectilinear propagation

How did Fresnel explained the phenomenon of rectilinear propagation of light using concept of half period zones?
2
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2answers
96 views

Suppose a light wave with wavelength 3m. What happens if one tries to contain that wave within a 1m container?

Suppose a light wave with wavelength 3m. What happens if one tries to contain that wave within a 1m container? If I'm going about this entirely the wrong way or have wrong conceptions about light ...
0
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0answers
71 views

Phase shifting using the Hilbert transform

I am still struggling to understand how the phase shift of a complex signal works. Today I stumbled over the Hilbert transform and heared that it is possible to phase modulate a signal $f(t)$ ...
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0answers
28 views

Calculating Dynamics of a Thick Sheet of Material

So I'm working on a computational neuroscience problem, and I'm attempting to model skin dynamics for use in some perception models. The problem is as follows: Imagine you had a two dimensional sheet ...
0
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0answers
74 views

Derive time difference of phase rotated wavelets

I have one question concerning phase rotation of signals and I am not sure wether it works or not: Let's assume we have a zero-phase wavelet x(t) i.e. Ricker wavelet. Unfortunately, in our ...
0
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1answer
64 views

Electromagnetic spectrum

I understand that the electromagnetic spectrum is made up of different frequencies of light waves, but is this true in all cases such as with longer wave frequencies? "such as with microwaves". ...
2
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0answers
79 views

Constructive and destructive interference in De Broglie matter waves

I'm a little confused about matter waves and especially interference. $\lambda = h/p$ The denominator is momentum and is thus reliant on mass. If we assume that the property holds for particles ...
1
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1answer
196 views

Dispersion relation for TE and TM waves in general anisotropic medium

I want to calculate the dispersion relation (the relation between $\bf k$ and permittivity and permeability tensors and $\omega$) for a TE and a TM wave with wave vector $\mathbf k=k_x\mathbf {\hat ...
3
votes
1answer
86 views

Power of Shockwaves

My question is about shockwaves and their power when they are created/how do they lose their power? Let's say that we have ground 0 with 10 grams of TATP on it. The detonation velocity of TATP is ...
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0answers
68 views

Rotate the phase of a wavelet

Let's take a zero-phase Ricker wavelet which is given by: $$ \psi(t)=\frac{2}{\sqrt{3\sigma}\pi^{1/4}}\left(1-\frac{t^2}{\sigma^2}\right)e^{-t^2/2\sigma^2} $$ in the time domain which is often used ...