Waves are disturbances that propagate through space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Why doesn't the group velocity of a plasma EM wave equal the phase velocity here?

For plasma EM waves we have the dispersion relation $$\omega^2=\omega_p^2+c^2k^2$$ where the plasma frequency $$\omega_p^2=\frac{n_e e^2}{\epsilon_0 m_e}$$ One can show that $v_p v_g=c^2$, i.e., the ...
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22 views

How to create planar acoustic waves?

The only way I can think of for creating planar acoustic waves is using a 2D phased array of transmitters, but even then the planar wave is not so planar (depends on the interference pattern, which ...
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44 views

Wave speed derivation

The wave speed derivation approximates the wave as a circle. It uses that to know that a=v^2/R. However, numerous functions can approximate the wave. A straight line, x^2, x^3, etc. If I used those I ...
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24 views

How does a linearly polarized spin 1/2 wave look like?

Spin 1 waves are easy to illustrate and a linearly polarized spin 2 wave looks like this, but what is the counterpart for a spin 1/2 wave?
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305 views

Why does the length of a wind instrument affect it's pitch?

I understand how length of a string on any string instrument affects it's pitch, but I don't understand how a short wind instrument produces a high pitch.
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146 views

why interference pattern changes with given relation when the source slit changes?

Why for interference condition to be seen the dependence relation should be like $${\frac{s}{S}}<{\frac{\lambda}{d}}$$.Where $s$ is width of source slit and $S$ is the distance between the source ...
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1answer
75 views

What do we mean by speed of light dependent on direction?

I have a statement in textbook saying: When the speed of light is independent of direction, the secondary waves are spherical. When is it dependent on direction and how will the secondary ...
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3answers
74 views

why doesn't pitch or volume change the speed of sound? [closed]

If sound is a propagated by particles hitting each other in a tranverse wave, why doesn't pitch affect the speed of sound? Since frequency is the speed at which the particles hit in a period of time, ...
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1answer
90 views

Are all diffusion-like processes described as wave-like in relativity-compatible formulations?

Citing from Wikipedia's article on relativistic heat conduction: For most of the last century, it was recognized that Fourier equation (and its more general Fick's law of diffusion) is in ...
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143 views

Pressure standing wave nodes at the end of the open side of a tube

I do not understand why standing sound waves can be formed in a one-side or two-side open tube. Consider a one-side open tube. In particular how does the reflection of the wave at the open end occur? ...
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1answer
14 views

Conditions imposed in wave reflection and transmission in one dimension

In the study of trasmission and reflection of waves in one dimension I do not understand completely the meaning of the conditions imposed. Consider an impulse $\xi(x,t)$ moving on a rope linked with ...
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188 views

Are mechanical energy of an element of a rope and energy density constant in the case of mechanical waves?

I'm confused about energy driven by a wave. Consider a sinousoidal wave moving in a rope. In my view each element $dm$ of the rope follows a simple harmonic motion in time. That means that the ...
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1answer
20 views

How do you tell direction and what's positive or negative in wave functions?

$$y = 1.00 \sin(5x − 2t)$$ So if I'm given $y(x,t)$, it's pretty clear what the amplitude, angular frequency and $k$ value appear to be. However, when I'm doing homework problems, the angular ...
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2answers
198 views

Standing wave on a rope fixed at both sides: minus sign in the reflected wave

I'm studying stationary waves on a rope fixed at both sides. In some books I find that the wave function studied is the sum of incident wave $\xi_1(x,t)$ and of the reflected wave $\xi_2(x,t)$. $$\xi(...
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1answer
16 views

Trasversal wave on a rod velocity

What is the velocity of a trasversal wave on a metal rod? Does it depend on the shear modulus $G$ $$v_{t}=\sqrt{\frac{G}{\rho}}$$ Or on the tension $T$ of the rod? $$v_{t}=\sqrt{\frac{T}{\rho}}$...
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36 views

Is disturbance propagation velocity equal to wave velocity in a solid body?

How do the disturbance propagation velocity and wave propagation velocity relate to each other? To explain my question in details I will describe the following situation from the theory of acoustic ...
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0answers
14 views

Half-life time of audible acoustic waves under given circumstances - is this model valid?

I need to find the half-life time of acoustic waves, given the information, that they are audible as long as their intensity $I > 10^{-12} W/m^2$ and the maximal distance $x$, where they are still ...
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1answer
18 views

Intensity of the acoustic waves coming out of the speakers at the very beginnig of their “journey”

According to the formula, the intensity of acoustic waves at any given point is: $$I(R) = \frac{P}{4\pi(R)^2}$$ where P is the power of the source and R is the radius of the force (Assuming that the ...
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1answer
54 views

Energy in a sound wave possible error?

In a certain text discussing longitudinal waves it stated that for a sound wave, both the kinetic energy and potential energy are maximum at the same time. I always thought that the potential energy ...
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1answer
28 views

Relation between variation of tension and frequency of a standing wave

What is the relation between a variation of tension and the variation of frequency of standing wave in a rope? I get this expression differentiatin the relation between $f$ and $T$ $$f=\frac{1}{2L \...
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0answers
38 views

Photon transmission

I want to know exactly how light travels. Are each photon in a light beam traveling in a cosine function? I'm confused because only when it goes through polarization that it starts to show this type ...
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0answers
31 views

Gravitational waves' Amplitude

Gravitational waves are disturbances in gravitational field which in turn is the curvature of space-time. So my question is it possible to somehow measure the amplitude of a gravitational wave and if ...
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1answer
80 views

Wave speed of a hanging rope

Let us consider a homogeneous rope hanging from the ceiling. I will call the vertical direction $x$ and the horizontal displacement $y$. When we apply the second Newton's Law to a portion of mass $\...
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43 views

Mechanical energy in an harmonic wave and in normal modes

I think I miss something about energy of a mechanical wave. In absence of dissipation the mechanical energy transported by an harmonic wave is constant. $$E=\frac{1}{2} A^2 \omega^2 m$$ But, while ...
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1answer
29 views

Measured organ pipe eigenfrequency does not match the theory

There are many well-known homework assignments to find eigenfrequencies of an open organ pipe leading to the solution for the fundamental frequency of such a pipe: $$f_0 = \frac{c_0}{\lambda_0} = \...
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1answer
31 views

Problem with linear mass density of which varies according to the law $μ = kx + a$

I have some problem solving this exercise: A wire of length $L = 10$ m has a linear mass density of which varies according to the law $$μ = kx + a$$ with $k = 1.8$ g m-2, $a = 0.5$ g m-1. The wire is ...
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26 views

Finding Amplitudes of Resultant Mechanical Waves

Let's say I have two arbitrary mechanical waves $y_1$ and $y_2$ propagating on a string in the same direction. The waves $y_1$ and $y_2$ differ in phase by an arbitrary angle $\phi$ and the ...
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3answers
34 views

Explanation as to why the sum of two sinusoidal waves, differing by only phase, can be represented by $2y_{m}\cos(\frac{1}{2} \Phi)$

How does the addition of two waves, differing only by phase, collapse to $2y_{m}\cos(\frac{1}{2} \Phi)$? Wouldn't the $\omega$ component of the wave still come into play given that it determines the ...
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11 views

Acoustic energy

Let's Assume that I'm sitting in a hypothetical container(room) whose 6 walls are PERFECTLY AND IDEALLY rigid and also are PERFECTLY reflective. Now if I start speaking anything in this room and so ...
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4answers
534 views

Are EM radiation and EM waves the same thing?

Are EM radiation and EM waves the same thing? I have seen this topics treated separately in many books. It is still not clear to me whether EM radiation and EM waves are synonymous. Is there any ...
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29 views

Is it possible to have two waves of different frequency on one string?

Would this change for different Hz, Wavelengths, Speeds, or amplitudes?
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23 views

Why do smaller wavelengths image particles more clearly when the particle size is already big?

Yesterday I scanned an ultrasound phantom that had cylindrical inclusions (1.5mm diameter). When I boosted the ultrasound frequency from 3MHz to 4MHz, these inclusions became much more clear. I ...
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89 views

Which wave carries more energy? [closed]

Which wave carries more energy? This is a school question (in a course a friend is taking) but I am interested in the answer:
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22 views

Huyegns Principle and data transmission

Huygens's principle (The Gist) states that for every object on which light is incident every point on that object acts a light source till light is being incident on it. So is it possible than WiFi ...
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2answers
53 views

How to derive wave speed/tension relation for the vibrating string?

I was studying vibrating strings and in my teacher's notes I found that, generically, if I change the tension on the string by $\Delta T$ then, the speed percentage change can be written as: $\frac{\...
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1answer
86 views

Diffraction wavelength relationship [closed]

This question appears somewhat similar to other questions asking about why wavelength affects diffraction (a concept which I'm still not 100% sure on...) however my query is different and not answered ...
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1answer
24 views

Medium particle velocity vs wave velocity

It is said that wave may have a uniform velocity. We could think of the time when exactly the 1/3 th wavepulse has finished pasing through this point, and 2/3th numbered wave pulse would do this ...
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3answers
33 views

Phases and sinusoidal waves

When we're talking about a wave, just a singular sinusoidal wave, what exactly is a 'phase'? I came across a question that gave values of frequency ($550$Hz), and speed ($330$m/s). The question then ...
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1answer
28 views

Which information do we get from the phase spectrum about the wave?

Let a wave is represented by an equation $$y=f(t)=10\sin(\frac{2\pi f_1t}{T} + \pi/6)+5\cos(\frac{2\pi f_2t}{T} +\pi/3)$$. Here, let us take $f_1=10 ,f_2=5 ,T=100$ Then, from the Fourier transform ...
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1answer
38 views

Why does the classical Doppler formula make a distinction between movement of the source and movement of the receiver?

I've tried rewriting the Doppler formula to include only the relative velocity between the source and the receiver of sound waves. However, when I compare the results with the results of the formula ...
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1answer
45 views

Can gravitational waves interfere polarize or show any other properties of stndard waves

Is it possible for gravitational waves to be able to produce phenomenon such as interference and polarization etc. which are observed in standard waves. Also is it possible for gravitational waves to ...
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4answers
692 views

Which formula for the de Broglie wavelength of an electron is correct?

So, I have my exams in physics in a week, and upon reviewing I was confused by the explanation of de Broglie wavelength of electrons in my book. Firstly, they stated that the equation was: $\lambda = \...
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0answers
44 views

Why does thicker aluminum do better at reflecting wifi

I have performed a experiment based one the ability of aluminium reflecting wifi radio waves. I have found out that the more aluminium foil i put on my reflector, the better result I can get. I did up ...
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0answers
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When light reflects from a medium of lower index of reflection to a medium of higher index of refraction, why does the light undergo a phase shift? [duplicate]

I learned in my physics class that there is a phase shift when light reflects off a low $n$ from a higher $n$, but never got the explanation.
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0answers
32 views

How does cavity resonance produce EM waves? [closed]

My understanding is it acts like a capacitor and inductor in a loop. The capacitor releases stored energy which is absorbed by the inductor through a magnetic field which then returns it to the ...
3
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1answer
125 views

Is meters per second equivalent to seconds per meter?

I know this question is probably ridiculous, but bear with me for a moment. This thought emerged while I was converting between nm and wave numbers ($\rm cm^{-1}$). In order to prove this conversion, ...
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23 views

Solving traveling wave using the shooting method

The spatially-dependent Hodgkin-Huxley equation for a cylindrical dendrite or unmyelinated axon: where $\frac{a}{2\rho}\frac{\partial^2V}{\partial x^2}$ is a diffusion term $a$ is the fiber radius, ...
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1answer
59 views

Plucking Guitar Strings [closed]

I was given this prompt: A musician frets a guitar string of length 1.5 m at x = 0.28 m with one finger, and simultaneously plucks the string at x = 0.14 m with another finger (raising it to a height ...
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28 views

Simple harmonic waves

When a simple harmonic progressive wave is travelling through medium,then each succeeding particle lags in phase before the preceding particle.Can anyone expain how does it lag? Thanks…
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1answer
26 views

Is it possible to low pass filter the amplitude of a sound wave?

Is it physically possible to block or attenuate noise above a certain amplitude, but leave other lower amplitude noises unhindered?