Waves are disturbances that propagate throush space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Why does noise affect FM radio less than AM?

Frequency modulated waves are less susceptible to noise compared to amplitude modulated signal. This is because the information in an FM signal is transmitted through varying the frequency, and not ...
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146 views

Why do waves diffract?

There have already been a lot of questions on this site on diffraction but I still believe this one might be slightly different. In electromagnetic waves, diffraction and any other phenomenon of wave ...
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158 views

Why are two independent sources incoherent?

Coherent sources are produced from a single parent source. But, why are two independent sources always incoherent? Two sources can produce light of the same frequency. Then, I guess the problem is ...
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37 views

Collapse of wave function

Can the collapse of a quantum mechanical state in general into one the eigenstates of an observable whenever its measurement is made written mathematically? If yes, how?
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1answer
72 views

What does (simple) $j/cm^2$ represent AND how does this result $6.959j/cm^2$? [closed]

According to the image shown below, this specific Laser Hair Treatment device claims that it has a concentration of $6.959 j/cm^2$. So far by research I have found that it needs around $6\mbox{ to }7 ...
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1answer
26 views

Diffraction from interatomic spacing

In diffraction from a single slit, we learn that the angular width of the central maxima, is given by $2\sin^{-1}\frac \lambda d$. For $d\approx \lambda$, the incoming wavefront should be spread to ...
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1answer
151 views

How far do air particles move when a sound wave passes through them?

How far do air particles move when a sound wave passes through them? I know that they don't actually travel, the question is how far do they oscillate or what is the physical amplitude of the ...
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131 views

Why do we calculate energy by integrate the Signal squared?

What's the interesting thing in the square of a signal? I know integrating gave us the sum of the differentiated energies, but why the Energy is the square of the signal?
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162 views

Do electromagnetic waves always move in straight lines?

When we send an electromagnetic short wave to the sky, it reflects due to the ionosphere effects. But if we send it horizontally, is it correct that it moves around the surface of the earth, and if it ...
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1answer
98 views

Could submarine SONAR kill a diver?

Could a diver swimming next to a submarine be killed or seriously injured by its SONAR? What physical aspect of SONAR affects the human body in a potential harmful way?
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1answer
91 views

Infinite potential square well solutions

My question is about understanding the different solutions of the potential square well. Imagine a square well defined this way: $$ V(x) = \begin{cases} ∞&\,{\rm if} x<0 \\ 0&\,{\rm ...
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0answers
59 views

Symmetry of wave pulse

How can one decide whether a wave pulse is symmetrical by looking at its equation? $$y(x,t)=\frac{0.8}{[4x+5t]^2} $$ represents a moving pulse will it be symmetric?
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3answers
156 views

How to calculate Standing Waves in Electrical Cables?

I have a 20 metre Coaxial Cable. I send digital signals down the cable ranging from 5 KHz to 50 KHz. I have noticed a pattern in the noise ratio, an oscillating wave. I predict this is to do with ...
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1answer
159 views

Can a macroscopic body have wavelength as that of electron? [duplicate]

Einstein has suggested that light can behave as a wave as well as like a particle i.e, it has dual character. In 1924, de-Broglie suggested that just as light exhibits wave and particle properties, ...
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126 views

cause of maximum kinetic energy and elastic potential energy at the same point of a transverse wave in a string

Suppose a string element oscillating transversely in SHM having both kinetic energy and elastic potential energy travels with velocity $u$. Let $y(m)$ be the amplitude. When it reaches $y(0)$, it has ...
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2answers
141 views

Is it possible to estimate the speed of wind by the sound emitted by a cable of an overhead power line?

I was near ($\approx40m$) an overhead power line and I heard a sound coming from the cables of the power line; I think the sound was made by the vibrations of the power cables due to the wind but I am ...
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1answer
210 views

Can electron exist as a standing wave inspite of successive superposition?

With the development of quantum mechanics, it was found that the orbiting electrons around a nucleus could not be fully described as particles, but needed to be explained by the wave-particle duality. ...
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1answer
75 views

Diffraction of sound

The sound waves, by the virtue of it being a wave, shows diffraction and interference. But in diffraction, I learnt that if the wave is allowed to enter through a small aperture, there is a central ...
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3answers
128 views

Can we explain Huygen's principle taking into account Maxwell's predictions?

Descartes gave the corpuscular model (1637) of light. Corpuscular model was further developed by Issac Newton. Model predicted that if the ray light (on refraction) bends towards the normal then the ...
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3answers
92 views

Do electromagnetic waves have endpoints?

When learning about electromagnetic waves at school we never talked about any endpoints as we did with standing waves, so I assumed that light has an endless length, but that doesn't make sense. So my ...
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1answer
61 views

How does a transverse wave propogate in a medium?

I have been told that trasverse wave propogates by the oscillation of medium particles in direction perpendicular to propogation. Consider a wave on a taught string (x-y plane). What is the ...
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41 views

Rijke tube: Why Sound is maximum when heated 1/4th length from bottom of tube

Why is it that the maximum sound coming from a Rijke tube happens only when heated wire gauze is placed at 1/4th the length of the tube from the bottom. According to Rayleigh: If heat be ...
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1answer
79 views

Frequency shift without affecting signal length

Non-physicist here. From what I've learned in university and what common sense says, a shift in frequency of a signal results in a change in its length in time. For example, if a sinusoid signal of ...
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104 views

Diffraction by a lens

The fraunhoffer treatment of circular apertures yields a diffraction pattern of circles, with the first minimum (dark ring) at an angular radius of $\theta$ where $\sin(\theta)=1.22\lambda/b$, where ...
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+50

Would there be emf induced in our body due to electromagnetic radiations?

The experiments of innovative Faraday and Joseph Henry in USA, conducted around 1830, demonstrated conclusively that electric currents were induced in closed coils when subjected to changing magnetic ...
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2answers
148 views

Why do light disappears the moment we switch off the source (inside the wooden box)?

I am failing to explain why light won't remain inside the wooden box in the following situation. I considered a wooden box closed from all the sides, with a bulb inside it. If we switch on the bulb, ...
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309 views

Fresnel distance and Geometrical limit

I read about the geometrical limit of wave theory. The source from where I read had a slightly different explanation to provide than here(The more rigorous answer is too complicated for me to ...
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1answer
86 views

Diffracton at the edges of an opaque object?

To understand the phenomenon of diffraction as an interference effects of several dipole oscillators (like in case of several symmetrical, not sawtooth, scratches in a diffraction grating), we ...
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3answers
131 views

Does brightness of the light remains constant with the variation of the distance with respect to the source in vaccum?

I have this question going in my mind from many days, i.e why brightness of light emitted from any light source around us decreases with distance? The brightness of light from tube light, streetlight, ...
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2answers
106 views

An analogy for resonance?

I learned that the phenomena of resonance occurs when the frequency of the applied force is equal to the natural frequency of an object. At this point, an object vibrates with maximum amplitude. How ...
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2answers
89 views

How to be sure that a He-Ne laser light is monochromatic

How can I be sure that the emission of a He-Ne laser contains only one single mode of laser cavity? The only thing that I know is that if I use a diffraction grating and the light isn't ...
8
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1answer
246 views

Are pure mechanical evanescent waves possible?

Consider a lattice of massive points connected by harmonic springs, with zero or periodic boundary conditions. If we make a repeating pattern of $N$ varying masses, the system will have $N$ bands of ...
3
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1answer
99 views

Why does a light wave invert at a boundary with greater index of refraction?

Is there a reason why a EM wave reflects invertedly when it meets a boundary point with a greater index of refraction. In the case of ropes, if remember correctly, the reason why it inverts is to ...
3
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2answers
64 views

Third order optical mixing

It's pretty straight-forward to visualise second-order non-linear optical mixing processes in which two waves of frequencies $\omega_{1}$ and $\omega_{2}$ mix up to generate new waves of different ...
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78 views

Question about the shape of the waves [closed]

What is the molecular level reason behind the pattern (sine function) of the waves?
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201 views

Theory behind patterns formed on Chladni plates?

In this video of vibrating Chladni plates we can see small sand particles align themselves into different interesting patterns (also shown in the image below) which correspond to some particular ...
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1answer
155 views

Is Huygen's Principle Axiomatic?

Is Huygens Principle just a fundamental way to understand light? It always seemed to me that it was somehow "derived" or that it should be-but is it simply a well-founded theory?
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44 views

Is there a consensus on the definition of wavelength for a solitary wave?

Solitary waves are by definition a wave of single nature so the usual definition for periodic waves does not apply. R. Dalrymple provides a definition but I saw a lot of other websites and papers ...
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183 views

A difference between Plane Wave and Collimated?

Collimation is clearly in reference to ray($\vec{k}_{xy}$ vector) orientation unlike waterfront continuity( $\phi_{xy}$ phase shift) described by plane-wave. Not to say that one is not directly ...
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1answer
59 views

1D wave equation as a function of sound speed

The 1D wave equation is given by $\frac{\partial ^2 p}{\partial t^2}=c^2 \frac{\partial^2 p}{\partial x^2}$ . I found in a reference that for an unsteady gas, where both the gas and sound speeds are ...
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1answer
66 views

Source of beating phenomena of a Michelson interferometer?

I was discussing the reason why we see beating from a Michelson interferometer, and one of my friend said it 's because the light have different frequencies, therefore, they would be out of phase. ...
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1answer
70 views

Differences of waves in water and air

When one drops a pebble in a body of water, one can observe multiple waves emanating from the point the pebble came in contact with water. Be it because the water "jumps" up and comes back down, ...
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43 views

What's the local law of propagation of disturbances

In Vladimir I. Arnold's Lectures on Partial Differential Equations, Chapter 3 Huygens' Principle in the Theory of Wave Propagation, which is devoted to the proof of Huygens principle (original one by ...
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1answer
73 views

Shaking water inside bowl causes waves but why does the water stabilize?

Suppose you shake water inside a container, then at first the waves goes up and down strongly but they gradually dissipate. What makes them dissipate?
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1answer
84 views

Modeling sound resonance in an arbitrary cavity

I am trying to solve a challenging problem, and I'm hoping for some advice on how to proceed. I want to model sound waves in a cavity for the purpose of determining resonance. The plan is to answer ...
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1answer
148 views

Periodic Wave formula; need explanation? [closed]

I was listening to Quantum Mechanics lecture and there were wave explanation; to be exact it is periodic wave .. its formula is v (speed) = lambda (wavelength) X f (frequency cycles/second) the ...
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2answers
121 views

Numerical simulation of sound propagation in air

How does one go about accurately modeling sound propagation in a room (with reflections, absorption, and diffusion characteristics) from the motion of a loud speaker? More specifically what are the ...
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1answer
96 views

Error in Chapter 15 (Mechanical Waves) of University Physics with Modern Physics - 13th Edition?

After reading this question I figured someone here would be able to answer this as well: I thought the answer to part (c) of this question: (Figure 15.8 to the right:) was $$\frac{3}{8}T$$ ...
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1answer
61 views

Is the sum of the amplitudes of an electromagnetic wave always 1?

It's been a while, and I'm trying to verify my understanding. I remember reasoning (but never being taught) that the sum of the (normalized) electric and magnetic waves in a single electromagnetic ...
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1answer
53 views

Coherence with an infinfinite number of waves

If I had an infinite number of sine waves with frequencies between 0 and 2, and I know what amplitude each wave has, is there a way for me to predict how they interfere? for example if I have: ...