Waves are disturbances that propagate through space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Conduction and propagation [duplicate]

What is the difference between conduction of electric wave in conductor and propagation of electromagnetic wave in dielectric? Why propagation term is used for dielectric and conduction for ...
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32 views

Calculating Dynamics of a Thick Sheet of Material

So I'm working on a computational neuroscience problem, and I'm attempting to model skin dynamics for use in some perception models. The problem is as follows: Imagine you had a two dimensional sheet ...
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81 views

Rotate the phase of a wavelet

Let's take a zero-phase Ricker wavelet which is given by: $$ \psi(t)=\frac{2}{\sqrt{3\sigma}\pi^{1/4}}\left(1-\frac{t^2}{\sigma^2}\right)e^{-t^2/2\sigma^2} $$ in the time domain which is often used ...
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34 views

How much can a thin layer of hi-speed material within a low-speed volume block a wave due to total internal reflection?

Consider a block of isotropic material with compression wave velocity associated with it, $v_1$. Consider a thin flat layer of high compression wave velocity $v_2, v_2>v_1$ that is buried within ...
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32 views

electron spin separation

I am having doubt whether the electron's up spin moment and down spin moment can be isolated from one another. If it got separated, will each moment acts as magnetic monopole (stable or unstable). ...
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114 views

Gerstner Wave Formula to Vertex information $(x,y,z)$

I have created a program, that draws a plane mesh, and allows to me edit or animate all the separate vertices along it. The idea behind it, is for me to be able to create a gridMesh based wave ...
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188 views

Inverse of the D’Alembert wave operator

Let $f(x)$ a solution of the wave equation $\square f(x) = 0$. I don't understand why the following operator $$ \mathcal{D} \equiv \frac{1}{2}(\nabla^2)^{-1} (x_0\partial_0 - C) $$ for arbitrary ...
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285 views

Electron and photon collision

So electron moving left ($v_{initial}=0.8c$) collides into photon going right. After the collision electron is moving to right ($v_{after}=0.6c$) and the photon is moving to left. What is the ...
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68 views

Is there a consensus on the definition of wavelength for a solitary wave?

Solitary waves are by definition a wave of single nature so the usual definition for periodic waves does not apply. R. Dalrymple provides a definition but I saw a lot of other websites and papers ...
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90 views

What could be the distribution of an explosion energy of a mining-grade and seismic exploration explosives?

Seismic exploration involves the excitation of seismic waves using the industrially made explosive charges. What could be the distribution of explosion energy of such a charges? My guess is that it ...
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91 views

What is the physical meaning of group velocity for elastic waves through crystals?

In a chapter about phonons they define group speeds for elastic waves in crystals as the derivative of the dispersion relation: $$v_g = \frac{d{\omega}}{d{k}} $$ I wonder though how they come to ...
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50 views

I've been reading that it's possible to create a “mostly magnetic” wave, and I have a few questions

Would it be possible with the "mostly magnetic wave" to have it behave in such a way that it would be undetectable by radio triangulation? I read about the monument at the CIA headquarters that was ...
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59 views

is it possible to load a transversal wave with a longitudinal wave

like in communication engineering for sending information what we do, we take a high frequency carrier and modulate it with the message signal so can we do the same thing like take a high ...
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114 views

Longitudinal EMAG wave?

I'm reading about optical waveguide analysis, and often come across the terms "transverse electric mode" vs. "transverse magnetic mode". As I unerstand, it means that the electric/magnetic field has ...
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1k views

How would natural (resonant) frequencies affect amplitudes?

I read $y=A\sin(2\pi ft)$, where $A$=Amplitude, $f$=Frequency, $t$=Time and $y$=$Y$ position of the wave. Since natural frequencies only take the most effect when they are close to the frequency. How ...
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169 views

How do you super impose two or more signals to occupy a fix area of space with the resultant summed wave?

Is it possible to super-impose two or more signals all sent from different directions as a standing wave with the resulting summed wave occupying a fix area of space that is also a complex area? Do ...
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72 views

What phenomenon is responsible for the evolution pattern of waves created by waterfalls?

I have been fascinated lately by the pattern of the waves created by a waterfall in my town. Specifically, the pattern shows a gradual decrease in the density of the waves as they travel away from ...
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162 views

Behavior of wave at boundary

Firstly, how is "density" of wave formulated as? Secondly, when wave, travelling in less density medium, meets with the boundary that has higher density medium next to, reflected parts of the wave ...
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814 views

Relationship between classical electromagnetic wave frequency and quantum wave function + de broglie frequency

As it is. As I study through classical mechanics and quantum mechanics, I began to wonder whether there is a relationship between classical electromagnetic wave frequency and quantum wave function ...
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208 views

How to derive a multi-reflection echo from a given single-reflection “trace”

Consider a one-dimensional semi-bounded "ray" (or thin "cylinder") of stratum (or just any homogeneous substance) which has several "features" along it's length (say, thin films). Consider a wave that ...
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536 views

Depth of sea and point at which waves break

Following up on this answer, is the point at which waves break on the sea shore a guide to the depth of the sea at that point? Could it indicate eg hidden rocks? Explain the direction of waves on sea ...
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143 views

Reflected electromagnetic wave relation

If incident electromagnetic wave is given as: $$\begin{align*}E_i&=A_e \cos(\omega t + bz)\\ H_i&=A_h \cos(\omega t + bz)\end{align*}$$ What would be relation for REFLECTED wave? Does it ...
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585 views

Double Slit Problem, Waves and Optics [closed]

Given d(slit separation)= $0.158\:\rm{mm}$, $\lambda _{red}= 665\:\rm{nm}$, $\lambda _{g/y}= 565nm$, L(distance from screen)= $2.24\:\rm{m}$ What is the distance between the third order red and ...
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69 views

Reorienting a sensor axes according to particle displacement directions

Consider a sensor which is located inside the solid substance. This sensor is capable of detecting the substance oscillations along each of the three axes (usually orthogonal, but generally, any ...
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82 views

Can electrons reflect light?

Lately, I have been watching sparks while connecting my electronic devices and I can notice that electricity is kind of blue, and theoretically it's blue because it reflects blue wavelengths?? And ...
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105 views

Frequency of Sound Waves

Is the frequency of the echo (resulted from the reflected sound wave) equal to the frequency of the original sound wave?
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80 views

What do light wave oscillations look like?

High school physics student here, so please bear with me for a moment. I know that light waves oscillate, but I don't know how. In textbooks and diagrams they're portrayed as wavy lines traveling ...
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221 views

Why are radio waves in the 1.43 - 2.5 Mhz range invisible?

Visible light diapason is 400 - 700 nm which is 1.43 - 2.5 Mhz. If using an antenna I would broadcast steady sinusoidal wave in this range, why the EM emitted by the antenna are not visible? Suppose ...
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Does brightness of the light remains constant with the variation of the distance with respect to the source in vaccum?

I have this question going in my mind from many days, i.e why brightness of light emitted from any light source around us decreases with distance? The brightness of light from tube light, streetlight, ...
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3answers
185 views

If a tree falls in the forest [closed]

The question of whether or not a tree that falls in the forest makes a sound - if there is nothing or no one around to hear it - comes up frequently at my house. So, my question is: is there any way ...
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898 views

Transmission of energy in medium and wave nature (periodicity)? [closed]

Is there any example of a transmission of energy in a medium that does not show wave nature?
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376 views

Does wave interference happen only to same frequency waves?

As the title says, from books and results from internet, I find that examples of wave interference always have the same frequency, only different in phase constant. So, I'd like to know if wave ...
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281 views

Lethality of sounds and extreme “loudness”

In theory, could pure sound be lethal? How loud would it have to be? Also, which events are the loudest in the universe, and how loud are they? I'm confining attention to events which occur regularly, ...
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Does increasing the tension on a string also increase the density?

Consider a string under tension, for example, a string on a guitar. When a guitar string is plucked, it vibrates at a certain frequency. When the tension on the string is increased by twisting the ...
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199 views

Are waves on water an example of gauge invariance?

So: Is the close similarity of small waves crossing water of varying depths ("depth potentials") an example of an approximate gauge invariance? If so, do other "only the surface dynamics matter" ...
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2answers
80 views

Why is a sine wave considered the fundamental building block of any signal? Why not some other function? [closed]

It is mathematically possible to express a given signal as a sum of functions other than sines and cosines. With that in mind, why does signal processing always revolve around breaking down the signal ...
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85 views

Does there exist a hyperbolic relationship between frequency $\omega$ and wavenumber $k$?

As the title states, is it possible to derive a hyperbolic relationship in the form of $\frac{x^2}{a^2} - \frac{y^2}{b^2} = 1$ between frequency $\omega$ and wavenumber $k$ I have tried to start this ...
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100 views

Doppler effect- will frequency continually decrease?

My problems: I know that when a person is moving away, the perceived frequency will be lower than the frequency of the source. However, in the question, if the person is moving away, the ...
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2answers
563 views

Why Shock wave propagation is faster

From The Blast Wave A fraction of a second after a nuclear explosion, the heat from the fireball causes a high-pressure wave to develop and move outward producing the blast effect. The front of ...
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457 views

Can we explain Huygen's principle taking into account Maxwell's predictions?

Descartes gave the corpuscular model (1637) of light. Corpuscular model was further developed by Issac Newton. Model predicted that if the ray light (on refraction) bends towards the normal then the ...
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349 views

Does our existence cost us energy?

Anything when it needs to inform its presense such as electromagnetic presense of charged particles and gravitational presense of particles due to their mass does so by sending information of its ...
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4answers
6k views

Why is distance between two successive nodes equal to $\frac{1}{2} \lambda$ in standing wave

I'm reading my textbook and it says the distance between two successive nodes is equal to $\frac{1}{2} \lambda$ in standing wave. If $\lambda$ here means the wavelength of the standing wave ...
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2answers
2k views

What is the best material and design for building a parabolic dish? [closed]

I'm currently using a homemade metallic spaghetti strainer with a wifi adapter inside it to increase my wifi adapter's signal reception, but would think that a different material, like the aluminum ...
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3answers
1k views

Sine wave, $\pi$ and frequency

Please explain the relation $\sin(2\pi ft)$ such that how the $\pi$ (which is actually circumference/diameter of a circle) relates with the sine wave which is having a longitudinal vibration?
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44 views

How does infrared radiation increase temperature?

Temperature is proportional to the average kinetic energy of particles in a medium. When impinged by infrared radiation, what happens on the microscopic level that translates that EM wave into the ...
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3answers
76 views

Question about intensity of EM waves

For electromagnetic wave if it's reflected from a perfect conductor standing wave can be form. I wonder why Poynting vector can be used to describe the intensity of standing EM wave. (see p.19 of ...
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3answers
60 views

How can a wave travel if it is spread over all space?

The wave equation in one-dimension is $$\nabla^2\psi = \dfrac{1}{c^2} \dfrac{\partial ^2\psi}{\partial t^2}$$ and in one dimension one possible solution to this equation is the function ...
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2answers
156 views

Are matter waves (de Broglie) classified as transverse or longitudinal? [duplicate]

We know that waves are of two types: transverse and longitudinal, and we have studied about de Broglie waves as well, so which one of them is it? Or we have other means to classify them?
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5answers
130 views

Does “apparent frequency” mean the Doppler effect is not an actual physical effect?

When discussing the Doppler effect, we use the word "apparent frequency". Does that mean that the frequency of sound is still that of the source and that it is some physiological phenomenon in the ...
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2answers
243 views

Why does light travel as waves? [duplicate]

Why does light travel as waves instead of say just a straight line? What are the forces that make a light photon travel in a wavelike pattern?