Waves are disturbances that propagate through space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Bass and Treble-Car Steroes

In a car which phenomenon, diffraction or the resonant frequency of the car, lends itself more to the ability of bass to go farther? Related Answer: Why do bass tones travel through walls?
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Varying the amplitude of a driven wave

I' d like to know whether varying the amplitude of a system at resonance is possible or not and if it is, how? I've calculated the resonance frequency of a material and I'd like to know the ...
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195 views

Are waves on water an example of gauge invariance?

So: Is the close similarity of small waves crossing water of varying depths ("depth potentials") an example of an approximate gauge invariance? If so, do other "only the surface dynamics matter" ...
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Dispersion-less media

As far as I know, vacuum is the only dispersion free medium for electromagnetic waves. This makes me wonder if there are any other dispersion free media for these waves? (Experimentally established or ...
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519 views

Factors affecting the size of a shadow

What factors affects the size of a shadow and how would you derive the diameter of a shadow of a circular object on a flat screen?
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A Doppler Effect problem with a moving medium

I tried solving the following question and started having multiple doubts: Two cars A and B are moving towards each other with some speed $25$ m/s. Wind is blowing with speed $5$ m/s in the ...
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A Musical Pathway

Using a small number of sound emitters, could you create a room where certain nodes emitted particular tones, but no meaningful sound was heard anywhere else. So, for example, by walking down a ...
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275 views

Can random constructive interference with sound waves cause damage?

Any two sound waves have a random chance to constructively interfere with each other at a given spot and this will cause an increase or decrease in pressure. So is it possible that a large number of ...
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51 views

the effects of an ln-prime transformation to physical models

I have rather a "toy" type of modelling-problem that appeared to me along a book I am writing on number theory. I would be outmost thankful for any concrete or inspirational answers, including ...
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Why do prisms work (why is refraction frequency dependent)?

It is well known that a prism can "split light" by separating different frequencies of light: Many sources state that the reason this happens is that the index of refraction is different for ...
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2answers
423 views

Wave function interpretation $y(x,t) = (0.35m)\sin(10\pi t-3\pi x + \frac\pi{4})$

Wave function interpretation $y(x,t) = (0.35m)\sin(10\pi t-3\pi x + \frac\pi{4})$ I used to deal with function with one variable And now theres are two, how can I interpret them? Is $10\pi$ still ...
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Historical aspect of wave theory of light

Huygens thought light as a wave. Wave is a propagation of physical disturbance. We now know that light is electromagnetic field. Electric and magnetic field fluctuates here. What Huygens really ...
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Refraction of light and frequency dependence

Why do higher frequency waves refract more, both ocean waves and light waves? Also why is energy stored in the frequency as opposed to the wavelength.
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147 views

Boundary conditions on wave equation

I am having trouble understanding the boundary conditions. From the solutions, the first is that $D_1(0, t) = D_2(0, t)$ because the rope can't break at the junction. The second is that ...
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89 views

How large of a solar sail would be needed to travel to mars in under a year?

I'm attempting to approach this using the identity $$F/A = I/c$$ I can solve for Area easily enough $$A = F(c/I)$$ and I know the distance $d$ is $$d=1/2(at^2)$$ But I'm having difficulty trying to ...
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228 views

Standing Waves in Flutes

How do the waves produced in flutes have a wave characteristic while maintaining a velocity that allows them to travel to out ear? If it were simply a standing wave I'd imagine that they would ...
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1answer
150 views

Relation of color and frequency for the visible spectrum

In this question the OP is looking for a way to see light that is outside of the visible spectrum without using electronic sensors. This got me wondering about the visible spectrum itself. Typically ...
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1answer
316 views

The second resonance of string?

What is the relationship between "the second resonance " and string and the wavelength. Like in this question: if the length of the string is 2cm with second resonance, then what is wavelength?
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1k views

Why do sound waves travel at the same speed moleculewise? (Same medium)

I don't understand what happens in reality (outside of wave theories). If I clap my hands I invest energy in the nearby air molecules, which move and transfer their energy to nearby molecules which ...
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4k views

Will changing amplitude change the frequency? [closed]

Will changing the amplitude change the frequency of a wave, or is it possible for a specific frequency (50 Hz. for example) to generate from shifting amplitude patterns?
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832 views

Slinky reverb: the origin of the iconic Star Wars blaster sound

This is a fun problem that I came across recently, which I'm posting here for your delectation. We all love a good slinky: they can be used for all sorts of fun demos in physics. One example is the ...
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65 views

Phasor representation of voltage in frequency domain

In a text on application of electromagnetism in transmission line, there introduces a phasor for the voltage (in frequency domain) $$\tilde{V}(x) = V^+e^{-i\beta x} + V^-e^{i\beta x.}$$ Here $V^+$ ...
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3answers
615 views

How to determine the direction of medium's displacement vectors of a standing wave?

Consider the following problem taken from a problem booklet. My questions are: What is displacement vector? And how to determine the direction of displacement vector at a certain point? Where is the ...
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3answers
263 views

Lethality of sounds and extreme “loudness”

In theory, could pure sound be lethal? How loud would it have to be? Also, which events are the loudest in the universe, and how loud are they? I'm confining attention to events which occur regularly, ...
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125 views

EM Waves Energy Loss

Where does the energy go when two photons interfere destructively at a point on a screen in Young's double slit experiment ?
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109 views

Longitudinal EMAG wave?

I'm reading about optical waveguide analysis, and often come across the terms "transverse electric mode" vs. "transverse magnetic mode". As I unerstand, it means that the electric/magnetic field has ...
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2answers
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How does the energy in a standing wave travel beyond a node?

In a standing wave, how does energy travel past a node? It should just get reflected. Assume the case of first overtone and you strike the string at a place. How will energy distribute itself? If it ...
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De Broglie wavelength, frequency and velocity - interpretation

Two fundamental equations regarding wave-particle duality are: $$ \lambda = \frac{h}{p}, \\ \nu = E/h .$$ We talk about de Broglie wavelength, is it meaningful to talk about de Broglie frequency ...
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144 views

Why frequency and tension doesn't change in the two medium?

I am reading a book about wave mechanics. There are two different cord (one light and one heavy) connected together, one person waving the lighter one, the wave transverse to the right from the ...
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2answers
219 views

In terms of the Doppler effect, what happens when the source is moving faster than the wave?

I'm just trying to understand this problem from a qualitative perspective. The Doppler effect is commonly explained in terms of how a siren sounds higher in pitch as it is approaching a particular ...
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1answer
250 views

Nodes and Antinodes for standing wave

In the arrangement shown in the figure below, an object of mass m can be hung from a string (linear mass density $\mu$ = 2.00 g/m) that passes over a light (massless) pulley. The string is connected ...
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178 views

Fourier Transform of ribbon's beam Electric Field

I have a monochromatic ribbon beam with $E(x)e^{i(kz-\omega t)}$ being the electric field's amplitude. I want to show that the lowest order approximation in terms of plane waves is ...
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3answers
237 views

Waveguides (in the ocean?)

The speed of sound in the ocean is given by $$c_s(\theta,z) = 1450 + 4.6\theta - 0.055\theta^2 + 0.016z$$ $\theta$ is the temperature in degrees celcius, and $z$ is the depth. In a simplified model, ...
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875 views

Power radiated by the sun at different locations

I am wondering can someone help to solve second part which extends first part; The power radiated by the sun is ${3.9*10^{26}}_{watt}$. The earth orbits the sun in a nearly circular orbit of radius ...
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Standing Waves: finding the number of antinodes [closed]

A string with a fixed frequency vibrator at one end forms a standing wave with 4 antinodes when under tension T1. When the tension is slowly increased, the standing wave disappears until tension T2 is ...
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Calculating phase difference of sound waves

An observer stands 3 m from speaker A and 5 m from speaker B. Both speakers, oscillating in phase, produce waves with a frequency of 250 Hz. The speed of sound in air is 340 m/s. What is the phase ...
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159 views

Can you “fold” EM or light waves? (i.e) long wave that is reflected by mirror in fragments - like in the game “Snake”

So, I was reading about the Casimir effect. Two mirrors facing each other attract to each other in a vacuum. The reason is due to pressure exerted on those mirrors from the multitude of EM waves (like ...
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1answer
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Phase shift of resonance [duplicate]

For resonance to occur, is it true that the force lags behind the motion by $\pi/2$? I saw some notes written that the motion lags behind the force by $\pi/2$ which makes no sense to me. As I watched ...
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158 views

The interference of waves and factors that affect cancellation?

If you had two repeated disturbances on the surface of a water, I know interference will occur. However, if I move the two sources of disturbances closer together, why would the 'gaps' between each ...
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1answer
204 views

How does one find the wave velocity and the phase speed?

While I was studying beats, I tried to find a displacement function of any particle in the most generalized form. I ended up with $$y=2A\sin(\pi(t-x/v)(f_1+f_2))\cos(\pi(t-x/v)(f_1-f_2)).$$ Now, ...
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Are there “gaps” in light, or will it hit everywhere?

Not sure how to word my question. Picture a light source in vacuum, so nothing disturbs the light (or similar conditions), 2d. If I move very, very far away, will it happen that some of the light ...
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1answer
242 views

Definition of energy

What is the definition of energy $E$ given a dispersion relation $\omega=\omega(k)$ where $k=|\vec k|$ and $\omega$ is not necessarily linearly proportional to $k$? What about momentum $\vec p$? This ...
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419 views

Eddy current losses in electric steel by harmonics of a magnetic field

I am working on an model of a permanent magnet synchronous machine. Right now I am stuck with calculating the eddy current losses caused by the harmonics of the stator magnetic field in the electrical ...
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4answers
1k views

Validity of naively computing the de Broglie wavelength of a macroscopic object

Many introductory quantum mechanics textbooks include simple exercises on computing the de Broglie wavelength of macroscopic objects, often contrasting the results with that of a proton, etc. For ...
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844 views

Can someone explain how water from a garden hose can propagate in a sine/cosine wave?

A video posted on Youtube. How does this phenomenon work? I know he is using frequency to propagate water in a sine/cosine wave, but how does it exactly work this way? Why do we see it as if its ...
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2answers
333 views

Mechanical Waves

In the book Young and Freedman 13th edition, the wave equation is $y(x, t) = A\,\text{cos}(kx-wt)$ The problem is, I find it hard to console with the fact that $y(x, t) = A\,\text{sin}(wt-kx)$. ...
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3answers
5k views

Are two waves being in phase is the same as saying that the two waves are coherent?

If two waves are coherent, is it the same as them being in phase? Please correct if I'm wrong.
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how to determine the direction of a wave propagation?

In the textbook, it said a wave in the form $y(x, t) = A\cos(\omega t + \beta x + \varphi)$ propagates along negative $x$ direction and $y(x, t) = A\cos(\omega t - \beta x + \varphi)$ propagates along ...
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Can light waves cause beats?

My question is pretty brief. When two sound waves of nearly same frequencies interfere, we get beats. But, I have not observed something like that happening in the case of light. In fact, most of the ...
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Wave propagation in an incompressible flow

Incompressible approximation of fluid flow is usually known to be lame in modeling the propagation of any disturbance in it, predicting a speed equal to infinity for the propagation of the ...