Waves are disturbances that propagate throush space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Help in understanding the derivation for Fresnel Distance?

An Aperture of size $a$ illuminated by a parallel beam sends diffracted beam (the central maxima) in angular width approximately $λ/a$. Travelling a distance $z$, it aquires the width $zλ/a$ due to ...
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62 views

Electromagnetic spectrum

I understand that the electromagnetic spectrum is made up of different frequencies of light waves, but is this true in all cases such as with longer wave frequencies? "such as with microwaves". ...
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276 views

Simple Harmonic Motion Question - Block on Platform [closed]

A platform is executing SHM in a vertical direction with an amplitude of $5$ cm and a frequency of $\frac{10}{\pi}$ vibrations per second. A block is placed on the platform at the lowest point of its ...
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276 views

Wave Function for a Sinusoidal Wave (Why minus sign?)

I was trying to understand how the wave function for a sinusoidal wave was derived, but did not understand one specific sign, the minus sign in the following formula: $$y(x,t) = A \sin(k x – \omega t ...
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84 views

What does (simple) $j/cm^2$ represent AND how does this result $6.959j/cm^2$? [closed]

According to the image shown below, this specific Laser Hair Treatment device claims that it has a concentration of $6.959 j/cm^2$. So far by research I have found that it needs around $6\mbox{ to }7 ...
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36 views

Diffraction from interatomic spacing

In diffraction from a single slit, we learn that the angular width of the central maxima, is given by $2\sin^{-1}\frac \lambda d$. For $d\approx \lambda$, the incoming wavefront should be spread to ...
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562 views

Can electron exist as a standing wave inspite of successive superposition?

With the development of quantum mechanics, it was found that the orbiting electrons around a nucleus could not be fully described as particles, but needed to be explained by the wave-particle duality. ...
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92 views

Diffraction of sound

The sound waves, by the virtue of it being a wave, shows diffraction and interference. But in diffraction, I learnt that if the wave is allowed to enter through a small aperture, there is a central ...
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70 views

How does a transverse wave propogate in a medium?

I have been told that trasverse wave propogates by the oscillation of medium particles in direction perpendicular to propogation. Consider a wave on a taught string (x-y plane). What is the ...
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137 views

How to be sure that a He-Ne laser light is monochromatic

How can I be sure that the emission of a He-Ne laser contains only one single mode of laser cavity? The only thing that I know is that if I use a diffraction grating and the light isn't ...
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82 views

1D wave equation as a function of sound speed

The 1D wave equation is given by $\frac{\partial ^2 p}{\partial t^2}=c^2 \frac{\partial^2 p}{\partial x^2}$ . I found in a reference that for an unsteady gas, where both the gas and sound speeds are ...
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77 views

Source of beating phenomena of a Michelson interferometer?

I was discussing the reason why we see beating from a Michelson interferometer, and one of my friend said it 's because the light have different frequencies, therefore, they would be out of phase. ...
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117 views

Modeling sound resonance in an arbitrary cavity

I am trying to solve a challenging problem, and I'm hoping for some advice on how to proceed. I want to model sound waves in a cavity for the purpose of determining resonance. The plan is to answer ...
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165 views

What is fundamental difference between wave and its 180 flip phase?

I'm studying property of sound wave and I was wondering what is difference between two waves (one is original and one is 180 flip phase of original) ? Amplitude and frequency remains same and also ...
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79 views

Why are waves, the means, of information transfer over long distances, excluding difusion or contact of info stored in matter

Practical long distance communication, which does not rely on the movement of encoded configurations of matter, from source to destination(odor,books,DNA,floppy disk), always involves waves (EM, ...
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63 views

Problem in progresive wave

In this progressive wave we need to find out the phase difference. If we define it by $\phi$ in the x distance, we get . $$\phi = \frac{2 \pi}{\lambda}x$$ But when we write the prograsive wave ...
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66 views

Fourier Transform of E-Field with Decay Constant

Given an atomic transition with associated E-field $E(t) = E_{0}\cos(\omega_{0}t)e^{-t/\tau}$ where $\omega_{0}$ is the natural line frequency and $\tau$ is the decay constant of the simple harmonic ...
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99 views

Mode of vibration comparing Classical and Quantum waves

I'm now studying Quantum Mechanics, and I took a course on Vibration and Waves last year. I have been trying to make an analogy between classical and the quantum waves. Is it true that both the modes ...
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143 views

Amplitude and phase in vector wave field

Is it possible to make some separation of amplitudes and phase for a general vector-wave field? For example, like a paraxial approximation of a complex scalar field of the form $$\Phi(x,y,z) = ...
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72 views

What are natural sources of longwave radiation

I am studying now the Earth radiation balance and I came across the question regarding the sources of the long-wave radiation on earth surface. The only source of theses wavelengths indicated in the ...
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14k views

What is the difference between phase difference and path difference?

I have learnt that path difference is the difference between the distance travelled by two waves meeting at a point. If that is path difference,then how will one know what is phase difference and how ...
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57 views

What are the properties of the Electromagnetic wave $E=E_0e^{-i\omega t}$

My question is, whether this definition $E=E_0e^{-i\omega t}$ includes that it is a plane wave, since I am confused by the fact that we do not have any dependence on the position. So about what kind ...
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111 views

Uncertainty and wave-trains

My textbook and the following extract from feynman's lectures present the same idea regarding wavetrains and uncertainty in their wavelengths. Why is it that a wavetrain confined to some space has an ...
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113 views

Frequency calculator

I have a bunch of readings of a wave consisting of volts and time. I need to calculate the frequency of the biggest wave, but i'm not sure exactly how. From what I've researched I'm thinking I need to ...
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153 views

Can we see light as it 'interferes' with itself and produces the characteristic double-slit pattern?

This TED talk suggests that we can now watch as a beam of light propagates through a bottle filled with water. My question is: can we use this new technology to perhaps 'see' the photon as it makes ...
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363 views

Wave function interpretation $y(x,t) = (0.35m)\sin(10\pi t-3\pi x + \frac\pi{4})$

Wave function interpretation $y(x,t) = (0.35m)\sin(10\pi t-3\pi x + \frac\pi{4})$ I used to deal with function with one variable And now theres are two, how can I interpret them? Is $10\pi$ still ...
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102 views

EM Waves Energy Loss

Where does the energy go when two photons interfere destructively at a point on a screen in Young's double slit experiment ?
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Calculating phase difference of sound waves

An observer stands 3 m from speaker A and 5 m from speaker B. Both speakers, oscillating in phase, produce waves with a frequency of 250 Hz. The speed of sound in air is 340 m/s. What is the phase ...
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764 views

Phase shift of resonance [duplicate]

For resonance to occur, is it true that the force lags behind the motion by $\pi/2$? I saw some notes written that the motion lags behind the force by $\pi/2$ which makes no sense to me. As I watched ...
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317 views

Eddy current losses in electric steel by harmonics of a magnetic field

I am working on an model of a permanent magnet synchronous machine. Right now I am stuck with calculating the eddy current losses caused by the harmonics of the stator magnetic field in the electrical ...
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128 views

what is the difference between constant and changing magnetic and electric fields? How do they occur? How do they form an electromagnetic wave?

what is the difference between constant and changing magnetic and electric fields? How do they occur? How do they form an electromagnetic wave?
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90 views

How was the sinusoidal model for propagation developed?

It's a little difficult to explain this question .. but I'll try anyway. To the best of my knowledge propagation models - audio, RF - are modelled as travelling in a sinusoidal form. Surely if a ...
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368 views

Refraction and Reflection Seismology

So I am wondering if I got the difference right. Both methods use explosives to send waves into the earth's surface. Now reflection seismology tries to get information from the reflected waves; the ...
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262 views

Transmission of Gaussian Beam Through Graded-Index Slab

The $ABCD$ matrix of a glass graded-index slab with refractive index $n(y)=n_0(1-\frac{1}{2}\alpha^{2}y^{2})$ and length $d$ is $A=\cos(\alpha d)$, $B=\frac{1}{\alpha}\sin(\alpha d)$, $C=-\alpha ...
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Counting electromagnetic modes in a rectangular cavity and boundary conditions

The electric field in a cubical cavity of side length $L$ with perfectly conducting walls is $E_x = E_1 \cos(n_1 x \pi/L) \sin(n_2 y \pi/L) \sin(n_3 z \pi/L) \sin(\omega t)$ $E_y = E_2 \sin(n_1 x ...
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360 views

How do we find the frequency of wave propagated along the x-axis?

I don't know how to solve question like this: A transverse wave is propagated in a string stretched along the x-axis. The equation of the wave, in SI units, is given by:y = 0.006 cos π(46t - 12x). ...
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235 views

Rayleigh diffraction by circular aperture

I am a beginner to physics and would need an explanation on a statement in a book "Karttunen, Fundamental astronomy". In a section named "Rayleigh diffraction by circular aperture", author states: ...
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208 views

Behavior of shock waves at relativistic speeds

Suppose I am in a spaceship traveling inertially at a velocity $v$ that is of the same order as $c$. As I pass by a metal bar that is oriented parallel to $v$, someone hits it with another metal bar, ...
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617 views

Changing magnetic flux graph?

In regards to a graph of the changing magnetic flux in a generator such as this one: a) The equation of the graph should be $\Phi = BA \cos \theta$. As $\theta=\omega t$ (angular velocity*time), ...
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682 views

What makes waves at beaches to come with high velocity and frequency at nights?

When we are in beach we can see waves coming when the sun light goes of the waves amplitude will increase what is the reason Some people said me that for moon light the frequency and velocity of ...
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750 views

Wave diffraction explanation

I'm trying to understand wave diffraction and I found this wikipedia article. It's in Czech so I'll explain a bit. I'm interested in the 4 images I couldn't find on english wikipedia. The first one is ...
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266 views

Help me to visualize this wave equation in time, to which direction it moves?

The wave is $\bar{E} = E_{0} sin(\frac{2\pi z}{\lambda} + wt) \bar{i} + E_{0} cos(\frac{2 \pi z}{\lambda}+wt) \bar{j}$ Let's simplify with $z = 1$. Now the xy-axis is defined by parametrization ...
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Where to find or how to make a strobe in the range 20-100Hz

Please see this for experiment details: http://ap.smu.ca/demos/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=224&Itemid=205 It is the classic: create a standing wave with a certain number ...
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22 views

Finding the distance between two osclilating particles in a wave

Assume a wave function $\psi = \psi(x,t)$ where $x$ is position from the starting point $(0,0)$ and $t$ is time. Two oscillating points A and B are located at $x_1$ and $x_2$ respectively with $x_2 ...
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60 views

Do waves accelerate?

Typically we think of acceleration as a particulate property but a previous question on this forum got me thinking. If we think of a wave increasing its velocity by increasing its energy/frequency ...
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42 views

Group velocity and phase velocity of a wave packet [on hold]

A wave packet in a dispersive medium is represented by the following equation, $$y(x, t) = \cos(1.0x - 5.0t)\cos(0.2x - 0.4t)\cos(0.1x - 0.2t).$$ Find the group velocity and the phase velocity ...
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Sound system and Temperature Effects

You arrange a patio with a sound system. Ignore all sound reflections. If you are at a certain location on the patio, you can find the two lowest frequencies you will experience total destructive ...
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14 views

Speakers and Changes in Temperature

Let's say that there is a speaker that oscillates the same way. Now, let's say there is a sudden drop in temperature. I know the speed of sound would drop. But, what will drop, the wavelength or the ...
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String and Tension Related to Waves [on hold]

You find a string. You create sine waves on it. If you increase the tension of the string, does wavelength increase decrease or remain unaffected? Explain briefly. Can someone check my answer: ...
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Sound waves travelling in air and the amount of air affected by the wave

If there is a sound wave travelling in the air, will the amount of air transported by the wave be proportional to the intensity? Here is my answer: yes, because as the energy of the wave is related ...