Waves are disturbances that propagate through space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Energy estimation of an acoustic wave

I have an issue with 2D acoustic wave field modelling. In order to estimate the energy propagation direction of an acoustic wave I use Poynting vectors $S$ which can be described by $$ \vec{S} = - ...
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79 views

Longitudinal waves in a large (infinite) solid block

Specifically, I am trying to roughly determine the sound produced by a ball when it hits the floor and bounces. If the ball exerts a pressure onto the floor, then certainly this pressure will go on to ...
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58 views

What is being deprived when a photon is being watched in double slit experiment?

How are photons being watched in the double slit experiment? What exactly does being observed mean, as it is obviously changes the state of the photon somehow - it must be depriving the photon of ...
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113 views

Interference - the shortest way from the point of constructive one to the point of destructive one

So this is a problem from Polish maturity exam. The image shows 2 speakers (G1, G2) and point B. The wavelength of sound coming from both speakers is 0.155 m, and the wave coming from both speakers ...
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970 views

“Derivation” of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle

The question I outline below is my textbook's "derivation" of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. The "derivation" my textbook uses involves wave packets. Suppose there are seven waves of ...
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120 views

How is it possible for light to be a wave and a particle? [duplicate]

I have always been interested in Physics, and lots of people say that light is a particle and a wave. How is it possible? How can a photon (a light particle) be a wave as well, when its a particle? ...
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549 views

Red color has largest wavelenght and violet minimum (in the range of visible light). then why does violet light appears reddish? RED + BLUE = VIOLET [duplicate]

My question is simple. Green light is more similar to red light than violet, then why is violet reddish and green not? in the language of frequencies and wavelengths, red and violet should contrast ...
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1answer
2k views

Can a macroscopic body have wavelength as that of electron? [duplicate]

Einstein has suggested that light can behave as a wave as well as like a particle i.e, it has dual character. In 1924, de-Broglie suggested that just as light exhibits wave and particle properties, ...
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2answers
721 views

Doppler effect problem with moving mirror

This was the given question: A light beam of intensity $I$ and frequency $f$, directed along the positive $z$-axis, is reflected perpendicularly from a perfect mirror which itself is moving ...
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2answers
663 views

Relation between the spin of a particle and the polarization of it's wave

Is there any intrinsic relation between the spin of a particle, and the degree of freedom of it's polarization? does it holds for any particle-wave couple? like EM-photon, ...
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506 views

Is there a way to increase photon energy by decreasing its wavelength?

Can I decrease a photon's wavelength by a medium or a vacuum? Are there other ways of decreasing the wavelength?
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649 views

Relative velocity of sound

Relative velocity of sound. As I know that speed of sound in medium is property of medium. And independent of source motion but depend on motion of audience or observer and motion of medium. But it ...
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126 views

Ocean waves, and surfing

If waves only move up and down, why is it that in the ocean you can move forward along a wave? I suppose it's a bit different then a normal wave because you have the action of the crest falling down, ...
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125 views

Cross-section of a wave packet

In text books, wave packets are one-dimensional drawings. But we live in a three-dimensional world. Suppose a wave packet from a HI-cloud (frequency 1420 MHz) is approaching the earth, distance about ...
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173 views

Relation of color and frequency for the visible spectrum

In this question the OP is looking for a way to see light that is outside of the visible spectrum without using electronic sensors. This got me wondering about the visible spectrum itself. Typically ...
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3answers
300 views

Waveguides (in the ocean?)

The speed of sound in the ocean is given by $$c_s(\theta,z) = 1450 + 4.6\theta - 0.055\theta^2 + 0.016z$$ $\theta$ is the temperature in degrees celcius, and $z$ is the depth. In a simplified model, ...
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2k views

Wave propagation in an incompressible flow

Incompressible approximation of fluid flow is usually known to be lame in modeling the propagation of any disturbance in it, predicting a speed equal to infinity for the propagation of the ...
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738 views

Refraction seismology - travel time for wave

I am taking an introductory class in seismology, but have some difficulties understanding the logic behind the formula used to calculate the time it takes for a refracted wave to return to the surface ...
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736 views

Reflection of sound waves

I was doing a physics experiment, and i encountered a question which i couldnt answer. The experiment was about using a radar technique to measure the speed of sound. The apparatus was a plastic tube ...
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280 views

Are the sound waves from fundamental strings impossible to interact with?

Edited the question thanks to some helpful commenters. Are the sound waves emitted by fundamental strings so small as to be impossible to interact with the world? In other words, do they disappear, ...
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How would natural (resonant) frequencies affect amplitudes?

I read $y=A\sin(2\pi ft)$, where $A$=Amplitude, $f$=Frequency, $t$=Time and $y$=$Y$ position of the wave. Since natural frequencies only take the most effect when they are close to the frequency. How ...
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384 views

How can Hilbert spaces be used to study the harmonics of vibrating strings?

The overtones of a vibrating string. These are eigenfunctions of an associated Sturm–Liouville problem. The eigenvalues 1,1/2,1/3,… form the (musical) harmonic series. How can Hilbert spaces be ...
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681 views

How was this pressure pulse propagation speed be derived?

Some lecture notes I was reading through claimed that a pressure pulse propagates through a liquid-filled tube (blood in a vein) with the speed $$c=\sqrt{\frac{A}{\rho}\frac{dP}{dA}},$$ where $A$ is ...
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How to compute the intensity of a polarized wave going through a polaroid?

If an electromagnetic wave is linearly polarized, the intensity of the light that goes through a polaroid is proportional to the square of the cosine of the angle between the polarization plane and ...
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570 views

A simple question about the stationary wave and fundamental frequency

Suppose we have 2 fixed end connected with a wire and now we insert a vibrator in the middle of the wire, and resonance occur. How would the fundamental frequency looks like? I know the case when the ...
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89 views

Close electric field lines in wave guides

In a wave guide, graphics of propagation of Transversal Magnetic modes show closed field lines for the electric field. For example, for a rectangular guide: $E_x (x,y,z) = \frac {-j\beta m \pi}{a ...
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373 views

Confusion concerning the use of wavenumber in exercise about Fabry-Perot etalon

In the exercise we are given that the spectrum of a light source consists of two spectral lines, which both have wavelengths around $500 \text{ nm}$ and the separation between them - given in ...
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514 views

Transparent boundary condition [closed]

I am interested in the finite-difference beam propagation method and its applications. I try to solve the Helmholtz equation. At first, i would like to solve numerically it for the easiest case, ...
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5answers
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Radio waves within an atom

What effect does the quantum world have on radio waves? For example, if I could shrink myself down and stand on the nucleus (or even smaller sub atomic particles making up the nucleus) with a device ...
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500 views

What are examples of Solutions of Newton's Laws that have analogs to Solutions of the Wave Equation?

The idea is to give examples of processes that deal with properties of a particle that have clear wave analogues.
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4k views

Amplitude at distance from source

So, there is a sound at $S$, whose intensity $I$ obeys the inverse square law ($I \sim \frac{1}{x^2}$). At point $P$, at a distance $r$ from $S$, the air molecules oscillate with an amplitude of ...
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44 views

Does amplitude of electric field and magnetic field vary with distance in em waves?

Does the amplitude of electric field and magnetic field of an em wave vary with distance?
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33 views

Why does the classical Doppler formula make a distinction between movement of the source and movement of the receiver?

I've tried rewriting the Doppler formula to include only the relative velocity between the source and the receiver of sound waves. However, when I compare the results with the results of the formula ...
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What happens to Newton's Third Law during the reflection of a pulse from a free end?

Well, it is known that a pulse gets inverted when it gets reflected from a fixed support while the polarity of the pulse remains same when the incident pulse gets reflected from a free end. However, ...
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64 views

Wave equation in classical mechanics!

We represent the wavefunction of any wave on the string as $$y=f(x-vt),$$ where $v$ is velocity of the wave and $x$ is distance from origin and $t$ is time taken to reach the given point and $y$ ...
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Distinguishing transverse and longitudinal from wave equation

Can we distinguish if a general wave or disturbance $f$ (not necessarily electromagnetic) which satisfies the wave equation \begin{equation} \frac{1}{v^2}\frac{\partial^2 f}{\partial t^2} = ...
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29 views

How to tell whether a wave is coherent or not? [closed]

I know that coherency means constant phase difference,but how to figure it from equation? Are all sinusoidal waves coherent?
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1answer
61 views

What the term 'phase' in a wave actually means? [closed]

I actually want to clear my conception about the phase. I have used it while dealing with wave equations. But could not get the actual significance of it. I have learned that, 'phase is a quantity by ...
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122 views

What is the physical nature of electromagnetic waves?

I've been trying to work out what the physical nature of electromagnetic waves is, since I reasoned that given electromagnetic waves have wavelengths that are given in distance units, rather than ...
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33 views

Waves hitting opening in wall (inteference)

Say you have two openings close to each other in a wall. Why does the length of the openings have to be equal to or less than the wavelength of the waves in order to create an interference pattern?
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30 views

Waves, matter displacement [closed]

When a wave travels through matter, the matter's particles return to their equilibrium position once the wave is passed, is that statement correct?
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34 views

How efficient is the forward transfer of energy in gravity (surface) waves?

Ocean waves (properly categorized as gravity waves since gravity provides the restoring force within the medium they travel) propagate the major part of the energy derived from winds along the ...
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318 views

Why does a continuous water stream form ripples when colliding with a surface? [duplicate]

I was in the shower one day washing my hair, and noticed that the water falling off my hair formed perfect streams that ceased to break into droplets for quiet some distance (probably about 5-6 cm). ...
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116 views

Is sonic boom louder than the sounds that a object traveling at the speed of sound makes, if so why?

Here are the wave-front models for both: I am in an introductory physics course. Just learned about this. I am not entirely sure if sonic boom is louder. But from what I saw, it's loudness is ...
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349 views

Is the wobbly rope depiction of a radio wave inherently wrong? And how do vectors of parallel waves align with each other?

I don't have a scientific education, yet I'm scientifically curious. Among other things, I'm struggling to understand the nature of electromagnetic waves. What I have recently realized is that the ...
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1answer
284 views

Maximum Penetration Depth for Ultrasound

How do you define the maximum penetration depth of an ultrasound? I'm assuming it means the depth at which the wave has attenuated to a certain small percentage of the original intensity of the ...
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85 views

What criterion did Abbe use?

For a microscope (correct me if I am wrong) the Rayleigh Criterion gives us: $$ R=\frac{1.22 \lambda}{NA_{condenser}+NA_{objective}}$$ But with the Abbe diffraction limit: $$ ...
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75 views

Group velocity and calculating wavelength [closed]

A stone tossed into a body of water creates a disturbance at the point of impact that lasts for Dt = 4.0s. Measurements indicates that the wave speed is v = 25 cm/s. (a) Over what distance on ...
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56 views

Wave hitting a boundary with a mass on it?

If we have a transverse wave that is infinite in the $-x$ direction and terminate by a mass $m$, that is allowed to move in the $y$ direction at $x=0$ as shown in the diagram below: I think we can ...
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Huygens' Principle During Reflection: comparing wavelets from before reflection with wavelets from during reflection

I was recently reviewing geometric optics, during which I read about Huygens' Principle and how it could be used to prove the Law of Reflection from the "light is a wave" viewpoint. I'll quote what I ...