Waves are disturbances that propagate through space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Significance of wave number?

Till now all I know about the wave number is its formula i.e. ${\frac{2\pi}{\lambda}}$. I always wanted to know what it really means. So can anyone please, explain me its physical significance?
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Sound waves - physics [on hold]

A closed organ pipe of length L is in resonance with tuning fork. If a hole is made at a distance L/4 from the closed end will there be resonance again? If so when?
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179 views

Treating matter waves as light waves?

Is it valid to treat a matter wave as a light wave with wavelength equal to the de Broglie wavelength of the matter wave? Either way please can you explain why?
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49 views

Can sound travel in the form of transverse waves?

We all know that sound is a longitudinal wave but in some books, I have found that sound travels in the form of both longitudinal and transverse waves while passing through rocks. Can anybody explain ...
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0answers
25 views

Waves: Phase Difference [on hold]

I know this is a somewhat elementary question, but I have always had some trouble mastering this material (this kind of question in general): Suppose two microphones are the same distance from a ...
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0answers
22 views

Conditions to find standing waves harmonics

I came up with a doubt on standing waves conditions. The type of question I find difficult to answer is of the following type. Consider a rope. I do not know if the rope is fixed at both end or at ...
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1answer
228 views

Why does amplitude of a mechanical wave increase and then decrease with increasing driving frequency?

I was doing an experiment where I explore how the frequency of the oscillation of a vibrating water hose (the end of the water hose), affects the amplitude created by the water path (a wave-like ...
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1answer
31 views

Situations in which there is path difference interference or formation of standing waves [on hold]

I came up with a doubt about standing waves and path difference in general. Consider these two different cases as examples. If I have a rope fixed at one end and I make the free end oscillating, I ...
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497 views

Is there any effect on mechanical waves by electromagnetic waves (and vise versa)?

Do electromagnetic waves like light and gravitational waves (due to moon for instance) affect on mechanical waves like sound? Can sound change the path of light?
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1answer
36 views

Vibrations of a string [on hold]

A string with length $L$ is stretched between two fixed points. The string can't vibrate with which wavelength? Four options are given, namely $L$, $L/2$ , $2L$ and $4L$. I know that the ...
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3answers
126 views

Why do we hear better during the night? [duplicate]

At night, we hear weak and far sounds approximately clear, while during the day we cannot. My high school physics teacher was saying that “this is because of interference of sound waves. During the ...
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24 views

Wave equation for odd spacetimes and source terms

It seems to be quite common practice, when solving the wave equation in spacetimes with odd topologies or horizons, to decompose the solution into a sum of the various origins (or destinations) of the ...
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2k views

Why do you only hear the bass when someone nearby is wearing earphones?

When someone nearby is listening to music through earphones or headphones, usually you can only hear the bass (unless it's really loud where you can hear the singer's voice and the other instruments ...
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39 views

Mechanical energy in an harmonic wave and in normal modes

I think I miss something about energy of a mechanical wave. In absence of dissipation the mechanical energy transported by an harmonic wave is constant. $$E=\frac{1}{2} A^2 \omega^2 m$$ But, while ...
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2answers
119 views

What is the least count of the timer clocks used in RADAR?

I was checking out some videos in YouTube regarding the working principle of RADAR. To quote some HOW IT WORKS: World War II Radar (720p), part 1, How does RADAR work? | James May Q&A | Head ...
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1answer
57 views

Conservation of energy in interference of light

In interference of light, I know that energy is conserved globally but how the energy disappeared at minima appears at maxima? Is there any path by which energy flowed or is it just energy couldn't ...
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32 views

Did de Broglie deduce E=pc? [closed]

IIUC, $E=mc^2$ follows from $E=pc$ if $p=mc$ and $pc=hf$ is the same equation as the deBroglie wavelenth. Is it safe to say that $E=pc$ is an equation by de Broglie or is that equation some other ...
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1answer
16 views

What happens when sound source is radiating through a hole in a cavity?

What happens to the external sound field , when loudspeaker attached to one wall is radiating inside a box and other wall has a aperture size of a diaphragm? Do we experience Helmholtz effect?
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25 views

3D wave equation of a 3D object [closed]

For an example I have to derive wave equation of a sphere, x^2 +y^2 + z^2 = r^2 and its solution (wave function). Boundary condition can be anything. I like to know about eigenvalue and its use at ...
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31 views

Plane wave propagation [closed]

Can anyone help me please understand how this is done? and whats epsilon ? many thanks
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3answers
29 views

Water in glass tubes producing different pitches when tapped. Why exactly is this?

So I've been making a DIY instrument for my physics project at school. I decided to try this experiment where I put different volumes of water into a glass cup, and I tap it with a spoon to create ...
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2answers
404 views

Wave packet in curved spacetime

It is known that the classical equation of motion for a scalar field wave packet on a curved spacetime background gives the geodesic trajectory (the e.o.m. is $(\nabla_\mu \nabla^\mu + m^2) \Phi=0$). ...
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2answers
50 views

What is the difference between real value and abs value? [closed]

I am confused here, though I have been reading about it for years. What is the difference between a real value and an absolute value? For example, when do we take the absolute value of pressure or the ...
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2answers
126 views

Minimum frequency of an electromagnetic wave

Is it possible to create an electromagnetic wave of near zero frequency? An electromagnetic wave carries energy. If we can make the frequency of an EM wave vanishingly small and make it practicality ...
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3k views

Low frequency electromagnetic waves

Some frequencies of electromagnetic waves are used for transmission of information, like radiowaves, microwaves, light, but some are not.. What about low frequencies? Perhaps low frequencies aren't ...
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2answers
200 views

why does the frequency of a wave remain constant?

They say the frequency of a wave is its fundamental character, thus remain constant throughout its propagation regardless the medium through which it travels. Could anyone explain why frequency of ...
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2answers
46 views

Why monochromatic waves exist even theoretically

I was reading this question. Where the author made a statement that If I take a wave with period T, it is also true that it has a period 2T, 3T and so on. That is, it has frequencies of 2π/T, but ...
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Why are FM radio waves less susuceptible to interference than AM? [duplicate]

When studying modulation of radio waves (or of most electromagnetic waves for that matter) I came across that question. Why are FM waves less susceptible to interference than AM waves? I know that in ...
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214 views

Period of double slit experiment

What is the period of the pattern from the double slit experiment? It varies along the pattern right? Namely I'm confused because when considering two point sources (See: Period of Interference ...
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36 views

Is there any solution manual to A.P. French's 'Vibrations and Waves'?

I'm trying to work through A.P. French's Vibrations and Waves. Unfortunately, I can't check the details of my solutions since the solutions aren't given with the textbook. Does someone know where I ...
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How to “derive” the wave equation without refering to strings?

The wave equation in $3$ dimensions is simply: $$\nabla^2\psi = \dfrac{1}{v^2} \dfrac{\partial^2}{\partial t^2}\psi,$$ and the intuition behind this is that at each point of space with coordinates $(...
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16 views

light interference

Recently while driving, i noticed that when it is dark, the light emitted from an incoming car with its headlights at full strength (bright) and with mine also at the same state, my windscreen sort of ...
4
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1answer
211 views

Diffraction and $k$-space

Regarding diffraction I am a little bit lost reading about reciprocal space and the space of $k$'s. As I understand it the Fourier relationship between a wavepacket $\Psi(\vec r,t)$ and the complex ...
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1answer
22 views

Reason for absorbance

First quoting the example which raised my curiosity"when light passes through polaroid it absorbs certain direction light rays" My question is how this phenomenon of absorbance occurs is this some ...
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1answer
420 views

How does a longer wavelength penetrate deeper with Rayleigh waves?

I'm struggling slightly to understand this idea. I've slowly been building up an explanation, so at this stage it might be just some confirmation I'm looking for, but also some guidance if I'm off ...
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1answer
44 views

Fresnel zone with different antenna heights

I've looked at the formula to calculate the first Fresnel Zone: $$r=17.31 * \sqrt{\frac{d_1*d_2}{f*d}}$$ whereby $d_1$ and $d_2$ are distances from the obstacle to the link end points in meters, $r$ ...
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2answers
121 views

Is sonic boom louder than the sounds that a object traveling at the speed of sound makes, if so why?

Here are the wave-front models for both: I am in an introductory physics course. Just learned about this. I am not entirely sure if sonic boom is louder. But from what I saw, it's loudness is ...
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1answer
112 views

Intensity of a standing sound wave at displacement nodes?

We know $$P = F\cdot v$$ where $v$ is the velocity vector. Since at the "displacement nodes" in a standing sound wave the velocity of the particles is always 0, the Power must be 0 and hence the ...
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2answers
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Can localized fluid perturbations be accelerated by pressure gradients?

I would like to know if there are any examples in fluid dynamics (or continuum dynamics) of small perturbations (or waves, solitons, or other "localized" solutions of the fluid) being accelerated in ...
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2answers
58 views

Why do we hear a different timbre when someone speaks with helium (or other gases) in their lungs?

Let me make one thing clear: I am fully aware that the change in timbre comes from the change in acoustic wave speed when going through a different medium (just like light). However, would I not ...
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1answer
47 views

Explanation of sounds waves and speed.

When a rocket is traveling toward a mountain at 100 m/s, the sound waves from this rocket's engine approach the mountain at speed V. If the rocket doubles its speed to 200 m/s, the sound waves from ...
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1answer
21 views

Will phase change occur in the formation of standing waves?

I have learned that standing waves are formed by two waves overlapping with each other where the two waves are the same in wavelength, frequency, and amplitude. I have a doubt in how the phase of ...
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1answer
50 views

Direction of momentum given by the de Broglie relation

The momentum of an electron can be computed by the well-known classical mechanics equation: $p=mv$ where $m$ is the mass of an electron, and $v$ is its velocity. In this case, since $v$ is a vector,...
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2answers
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Huygens' Principle During Reflection: comparing wavelets from before reflection with wavelets from during reflection

I was recently reviewing geometric optics, during which I read about Huygens' Principle and how it could be used to prove the Law of Reflection from the "light is a wave" viewpoint. I'll quote what I ...
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what is the plane of the matter waves?

We all know that in an electromagnetic waves there is one wave whose plane is perpendicular to the other. so you see that there is a plane and every book which i have read shows the same. now i come ...
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362 views

Derivation of Fresnel distance

An aperture of size $a$ illuminated by a parallel beam sends diffracted beam (the central maximum) in angular width approximately $\lambda/a$. Travelling a distance $z$, it acquires the width $z \...
16
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3answers
400 views

Momentum of transverse waves on a string

In general, if a wave carries energy density $u$ with velocity $v$, it also carries momentum density $u/v$. I've seen this explicitly shown for electromagnetic waves and (longitudinal) sound waves. ...
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122 views

Waves - determining whether a given formula represents a wave

Well the basic formula of a wave needs to contain $$y(x,t) = f(x \pm vt)$$ where the sign depends upon the direction of propagation of the wave. However, not every function in the form $y(x,t) = f(x ...
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51 views

Is the speed of a wave determined by the medium in which it travels, the frequency of the source, or both?

I know that for a string of linear density $\mu$ and tension $T$, the wave speed is given by $v=\sqrt{\frac{T}{\mu }}$. Additionally, the speed of any sinusoidal wave is given by $v=\lambda f$. My ...