3
votes
0answers
99 views

“Derivation” of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle

Ok, so I posted this in the mathematics StackExchange, but got no response. The question I outline below is my textbook's "derivation" of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. The "derivation" my ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

group and phase velocity of free particle [duplicate]

If Schrödinger wave equation is for matter waves then for a free particle Group velocity $V_g =2$ Phase velocity $V_p$ But matter waves satisfy the relation $V_g V_p = C^2$ where $V_p>C$ Does this ...
3
votes
1answer
243 views

Why do we must initially assume that the wavefunction is complex?

The sound waves are real, and they can interfere, so corresponding apparat may be used in quantum mechanics. We also may use the time dependence in a form of orthogonal matrix multiplying the initial ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Quantum Excitations

In the context of quantum field theory, is the schrodinger or dirac equation actually describing some sort of an actual wave in some field like light in EM field ? So all particles are actually waves ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Learning about group velocity, phase velocity and particle velocity [duplicate]

I am studying quantum physics and I would like to know a bit more in detail about group velocity, particle velocity and phase velocity. Can you guys suggest some books/online resources where I can ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Conduction and propagation

What is the difference between conduction of electric wave in conductor and propagation of electromagnetic wave in dielectric? Why propagation term is used for dielectric and conduction for ...
2
votes
2answers
78 views

Suppose a light wave with wavelength 3m. What happens if one tries to contain that wave within a 1m container?

Suppose a light wave with wavelength 3m. What happens if one tries to contain that wave within a 1m container? If I'm going about this entirely the wrong way or have wrong conceptions about light ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Can there exist a Wave which changes the quantum states of particles?

i'm a high school student and i was reading about electromagnetic waves and how they transport energy and that the electric and magnetic fields sustain each other. I have also read about longitudinal ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Collapse of wave function

Can the collapse of a quantum mechanical state in general into one the eigenstates of an observable whenever its measurement is made written mathematically? If yes, how?
0
votes
1answer
91 views

Infinite potential square well solutions

My question is about understanding the different solutions of the potential square well. Imagine a square well defined this way: $$ V(x) = \begin{cases} ∞&\,{\rm if} x<0 \\ 0&\,{\rm ...
2
votes
1answer
159 views

Can a macroscopic body have wavelength as that of electron? [duplicate]

Einstein has suggested that light can behave as a wave as well as like a particle i.e, it has dual character. In 1924, de-Broglie suggested that just as light exhibits wave and particle properties, ...
0
votes
1answer
212 views

Can electron exist as a standing wave inspite of successive superposition?

With the development of quantum mechanics, it was found that the orbiting electrons around a nucleus could not be fully described as particles, but needed to be explained by the wave-particle duality. ...
0
votes
2answers
78 views

Question about the shape of the waves [closed]

What is the molecular level reason behind the pattern (sine function) of the waves?
3
votes
1answer
214 views

Are matter waves transverse and can they be polarized?

Are matter waves transverse and can they be polarized? What I know:I'm aware of the de Broglie matter waves hypothesis and de Broglie wavelength relation(at a very basic level as part of high school ...
0
votes
2answers
87 views

Mode of vibration comparing Classical and Quantum waves

I'm now studying Quantum Mechanics, and I took a course on Vibration and Waves last year. I have been trying to make an analogy between classical and the quantum waves. Is it true that both the modes ...
1
vote
2answers
83 views

Why the wave-particle duality cannot be explained as a traveling-standing wave duality?

This would explain why speed and position cannot be measured at the same time, since either the wave would be traveling (speed) or enclosed and standing (position). The act of enclosing it (to be ...
1
vote
3answers
297 views

What is the energy of a standing EM wave? Is it probabilistic?

In a cavity, the standing wave will constructively interfere with itself, so its energy gets higher while the oscillator is still vibrating. Since the vibration time is not a constant value, and ...
9
votes
2answers
297 views

How is the Schroedinger equation a wave equation?

Wave equations take the form: $$\frac{ \partial^2 f} {\partial t^2} = c^2 \nabla ^2f$$ But the Schroedinger equation takes the form: $$i \hbar \frac{ \partial f} {\partial t} = - \frac{\hbar ...
0
votes
1answer
84 views

Uncertainty and wave-trains

My textbook and the following extract from feynman's lectures present the same idea regarding wavetrains and uncertainty in their wavelengths. Why is it that a wavetrain confined to some space has an ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

the effects of an ln-prime transformation to physical models

I have rather a "toy" type of modelling-problem that appeared to me along a book I am writing on number theory. I would be outmost thankful for any concrete or inspirational answers, including ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

EM Waves Energy Loss

Where does the energy go when two photons interfere destructively at a point on a screen in Young's double slit experiment ?
6
votes
2answers
2k views

De Broglie wavelength, frequency and velocity - interpretation

Two fundamental equations regarding wave-particle duality are: $$ \lambda = \frac{h}{p}, \\ \nu = E/h .$$ We talk about de Broglie wavelength, is it meaningful to talk about de Broglie frequency ...
1
vote
1answer
222 views

Definition of energy

What is the definition of energy $E$ given a dispersion relation $\omega=\omega(k)$ where $k=|\vec k|$ and $\omega$ is not necessarily linearly proportional to $k$? What about momentum $\vec p$? This ...
10
votes
4answers
717 views

Validity of naively computing the de Broglie wavelength of a macroscopic object

Many introductory quantum mechanics textbooks include simple exercises on computing the de Broglie wavelength of macroscopic objects, often contrasting the results with that of a proton, etc. For ...
1
vote
1answer
660 views

De broglie equation

What is the de Broglie wavelength? Also, does the $\lambda$ sign in the de Broglie equation stand for the normal wavelength or the de Broglie wavelength? If $\lambda$ is the normal wavelength of a ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Confused over complex representation of the wave

My quantum mechanics textbook says that the following is a representation of a wave traveling in the +$x$ direction:$$\Psi(x,t)=Ae^{i\left(kx-\omega t\right)}\tag1$$ I'm having trouble visualizing ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Deriving group velocity

At the introduction to quantum mechanic phase $v_p$ and group $v_g$ velocities are often presented. I know how to derive $v_p$ and get equation: $$ \scriptsize v_p=\frac{\omega}{k} $$ What i dont ...
16
votes
3answers
3k views

Amplitude of an electromagnetic wave containing a single photon

Given a light pulse in vacuum containing a single photon with an energy $E=h\nu$, what is the peak value of the electric / magnetic field?
8
votes
6answers
857 views

What is the meaning of the word “particle” in particle physics?

I want to use Matt Strassler's definition of the word "particle" as a specific example: Matt Strassler writes: (1) "...all the elementary “particles” (i.e. quanta) of nature are quanta of waves ...
5
votes
4answers
829 views

What does a de Broglie wave look like?

What does a de Broglie wave look like? Are de Broglie waves transverse or longitudinal? Can they be polarized? What about the de Broglie wave of a ground state neutral spin-zero Helium 4 atom? ...
4
votes
2answers
654 views

Matter waves - DeBroglie's relations

I am currently studying from Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers by Taylor et al. They derive the DeBroglie relation $p=h/\lambda$ from setting mass $m=0$ in the energy-momentum relation ...
5
votes
3answers
701 views

What is the mass of a wave?

The slide called "QUANTA" here says that "One Quantum has a definite mass" and the picture shows a wave. So, What is meant by the mass of a wave?
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Group Velocity and Phase Velocity of Matter Wave?

In quantum mechanics, what is the difference between group velocity and phase velocity of matter wave? How can it also be that phase velocity of matter wave always exceeds the speed of light?
0
votes
0answers
307 views

Intensity of the diffraction pattern of the double slit

I am trying another approach for my last unanswered question. (Bounty still on for 3 days. Anyone? Please?) Note that this is not the same question but a greatly simplified version concerning a much ...
2
votes
2answers
369 views

Why is $\Delta x \Delta k \approx 1$ in any pulse?

In my physics textbook, it says that for any pulse, if $\Delta x$ becomes smaller, $\Delta k$ becomes larger where $k$ refers to $2\pi/\lambda$ and $x$ is x-axis displacement, as described by $\Delta ...
2
votes
0answers
90 views

After quantization of electron vibrations, do we need electrons anyway?

The title question is not ment in a general context, but one in which goes to the plasmon theory. In that case, how is are the statistics (boson vs. fermions) of plasmons determined? And is there an ...
8
votes
3answers
292 views

Intuitive explanation for the de Broglie / Planck relations

A friend asked me to explain "why" a particle's energy is proportional to it's frequency, i.e: $$E=h\nu$$ The reason this result is so un-intuitive, is that in the macroscopic world, A wave's energy ...
1
vote
1answer
517 views

How Light or Water Intensity is equal to square modulus of wave function of Light or Water Waves $I=|\psi|^2 \,$?

I've seen the Wave Function as a psi $\Psi$ $\psi$. And always heard that the wave function is the Complex Number as Imaginary and real number. But I've never seen it I've never seen components of ...
1
vote
2answers
316 views

matter wave and wave function

Is there any mathematical relationship between matter wave (or de Broglie wave) and wave function? Also, does each type of particle (e.g. photon, electron, positron etc.) have its own unique wave ...
1
vote
3answers
280 views

Testing my understanding of QM - The Double Slit Experiment without the slit

First off, sorry to throw in another question from someone who hasn't studied the maths. I'd like to see if I have a correct (if very basic and non-mathematical) understanding of the wave and ...
1
vote
2answers
252 views

Radar Frequency Bandwidth

I've come across an interesting question in the course of doing some exam review in a quantum mechanics book and thought I'd share it here. "What must be the frequency bandwidth of the detecting and ...
4
votes
2answers
186 views

Does a finite wave necessarily have to be non-monochromatic in reality?

Does a finite wave necessarily have to be non-monochromatic in reality, or is that implication just a result of the mathematical analysis? I always wonder at these sort of things that come out of a ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Speed of a particle in quantum mechanics: phase velocity vs. group velocity

Given that one usually defines two different velocities for a wave, these being the phase velocity and the group velocity, I was asking their meaning for the associated particle in quantum mechanics. ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Why does Davisson-Germer experiment confirm electron's wave-particle duality?

First I apologize if my question is trivial and for my poor English. I was wondering why my teacher states that "electron's wave-particle duality is verified if we observe diffraction of the electron ...
3
votes
1answer
130 views

What is it that undulates in a particle?

When there is a wave, something is undulating. In the example of a rope, the rope is what undulates. In the case of a ripple on a pond, the water is undulating, and when a sound wave propagates, the ...
2
votes
5answers
594 views

Radio waves within an atom

What effect does the quantum world have on radio waves? For example, if I could shrink myself down and stand on the nucleus (or even smaller sub atomic particles making up the nucleus) with a device ...
3
votes
1answer
676 views

Simple Quantum Mechanics question about the Free particle, (part1)

I am reading Introduction to Quantum Mechanics by David Griffiths and I am in Ch2 page 59. He starts out writing the time dependent Schrödinger equation and the solution for $\psi(x,t)$ for the free ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Light waves and Schrödinger probability waves

Ok, bearing in mind that I only have a brief understanding of quantum mechanics (no formal education, only from reading about concepts in books), so I could be way off here, I have a question ...
-1
votes
3answers
2k views

Why electrons behave as a particle and also as a wave?

Why do electrons (and other very small particles) sometimes behave as particles (i.e. when we are not looking at them) where as other times they behave as waves?
3
votes
3answers
256 views

Knowing when wavefunction collapses

So I learned that after a measurement of, lets say the position of the wavefunction of a particle is made, if another measurement of the position of the particle is made right away, you should get the ...