Waves are disturbances that propagate through space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Which wave carries more energy?

Which wave carries more energy? This is a school question (in a course a friend is taking) but I am interested in the answer:
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20 views

Huyegns Principle and data transmission

Huygens's principle (The Gist) states that for every object on which light is incident every point on that object acts a light source till light is being incident on it. So is it possible than WiFi ...
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34 views

How to derive wave speed/tension relation for the vibrating string?

I was studying vibrating strings and in my teacher's notes I found that, generically, if I change the tension on the string by $\Delta T$ then, the speed percentage change can be written as: ...
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57 views

Diffraction wavelength relationship [on hold]

This question appears somewhat similar to other questions asking about why wavelength affects diffraction (a concept which I'm still not 100% sure on...) however my query is different and not answered ...
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1answer
17 views

Medium particle velocity vs wave velocity

It is said that wave may have a uniform velocity. We could think of the time when exactly the 1/3 th wavepulse has finished pasing through this point, and 2/3th numbered wave pulse would do this ...
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3answers
28 views

Phases and sinusoidal waves

When we're talking about a wave, just a singular sinusoidal wave, what exactly is a 'phase'? I came across a question that gave values of frequency ($550$Hz), and speed ($330$m/s). The question then ...
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24 views

Which information do we get from the phase spectrum about the wave?

Let a wave is represented by an equation $$y=f(t)=10\sin(\frac{2\pi f_1t}{T} + \pi/6)+5\cos(\frac{2\pi f_2t}{T} +\pi/3)$$. Here, let us take $f_1=10 ,f_2=5 ,T=100$ Then, from the Fourier transform ...
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1answer
31 views

Why does the classical Doppler formula make a distinction between movement of the source and movement of the receiver?

I've tried rewriting the Doppler formula to include only the relative velocity between the source and the receiver of sound waves. However, when I compare the results with the results of the formula ...
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1answer
38 views

Can gravitational waves interfere polarize or show any other properties of stndard waves

Is it possible for gravitational waves to be able to produce phenomenon such as interference and polarization etc. which are observed in standard waves. Also is it possible for gravitational waves to ...
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650 views

Which formula for the de Broglie wavelength of an electron is correct?

So, I have my exams in physics in a week, and upon reviewing I was confused by the explanation of de Broglie wavelength of electrons in my book. Firstly, they stated that the equation was: $\lambda = ...
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Explain quality factor and bandwidth [duplicate]

Can anyone explain concept of quality factor and bandwidth with a mechanical example?
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36 views

Why does thicker aluminum do better at reflecting wifi

I have performed a experiment based one the ability of aluminium reflecting wifi radio waves. I have found out that the more aluminium foil i put on my reflector, the better result I can get. I did up ...
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11 views

When light reflects from a medium of lower index of reflection to a medium of higher index of refraction, why does the light undergo a phase shift? [duplicate]

I learned in my physics class that there is a phase shift when light reflects off a low $n$ from a higher $n$, but never got the explanation.
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22 views

How does cavity resonance produce EM waves?

My understanding is it acts like a capacitor and inductor in a loop. The capacitor releases stored energy which is absorbed by the inductor through a magnetic field which then returns it to the ...
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1answer
89 views

Is meters per second equivalent to seconds per meter?

I know this question is probably ridiculous, but bear with me for a moment. This thought emerged while I was converting between nm and wave numbers ($\rm cm^{-1}$). In order to prove this conversion, ...
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18 views

Solving traveling wave using the shooting method

The spatially-dependent Hodgkin-Huxley equation for a cylindrical dendrite or unmyelinated axon: where $\frac{a}{2\rho}\frac{\partial^2V}{\partial x^2}$ is a diffusion term $a$ is the fiber radius, ...
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49 views

Plucking Guitar Strings [closed]

I was given this prompt: A musician frets a guitar string of length 1.5 m at x = 0.28 m with one finger, and simultaneously plucks the string at x = 0.14 m with another finger (raising it to a height ...
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22 views

Simple harmonic waves

When a simple harmonic progressive wave is travelling through medium,then each succeeding particle lags in phase before the preceding particle.Can anyone expain how does it lag? Thanks…
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1answer
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Is it possible to low pass filter the amplitude of a sound wave?

Is it physically possible to block or attenuate noise above a certain amplitude, but leave other lower amplitude noises unhindered?
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1answer
21 views

Can you have a problem with a Dirichlet boundary condition but with waves that reflect off the boundary?

Say we are looking for a solution to the Helmholtz equation $$(\Delta + k^2) u = 0,$$ in in the upper half space ($y > 0$) in 2D with a Dirichlet boundary condition on the $x$-axis, that is, $u(x, ...
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25 views

How to solve the following wave equation? [closed]

We have paraxial beam propagating in a uniaxial anisotropic media. When such is the case wave can be divided into two orthogonal parts: Ordinary wave beam Extraordinary wave beam. The ordinary ...
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3answers
98 views

Transverse simple harmonic wave travelling in a string [closed]

This question came in my exam. My Attempt: I thought that the tension will not vary in the string because since we know that velocity of wave in a string is given by $$v=(T/m)^{1/2} $$ where $v$ ...
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1answer
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+50

Rope waves with a twist

In the picture you see a person walking a slackline. A slackline is a tensioned flatband of polyester. Typical tensions are between 1 kN to 15 kN depending on the length of the line. The lines are ...
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3answers
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Why is the Plane progressive wave equation $y= a\sin (kx-wt)$ for positive direction of x-axis?

Likewise, why is $y= a\sin(kx+\omega t)$ for negative direction? What is the basis/derivation for this?
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What is the player's role in the functioning of a theremin?

I recently see a video on how the theremin works, and wasn't satisfied with the answer. I watched around, but they all seem to give the same explanation. A diagram as below is given, and it is ...
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1answer
29 views

Wave Velocity vs. Phase Velocity

I am trying to understand the difference between 'wave velocity' and 'phase velocity'. I know that generally they are equal, but when is that not the case? I, of course, tried to google it, and ...
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1answer
41 views

How do waves transfer mass?

A similar question was asked here, however the discussion was led astray by involving the equation $E=mc^2$. I know that waves transfer energy, but do they transfer mass? And, if they do, what would ...
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10 views

Energy density of a transverse

I'm finding it hard to understand the concept of energy density of a transverse wave. I know the formula, but I can't quite get my head around it. I know energy density is energy over volume, but ...
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712 views

Don't all waves transport mass?

How do matter waves not transport mass? I know that matter waves are associated with moving sub-atomic particles(which is insignificant for macroscopic particles). If a wave is associated with a ...
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3answers
21 views

Is the speed of a wave determined by the medium in which it travels, the frequency of the source, or both?

I know that for a string of linear density $\mu$ and tension $T$, the wave speed is given by $v=\sqrt{\frac{T}{\mu }}$. Additionally, the speed of any sinusoidal wave is given by $v=\lambda f$. My ...
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3answers
70 views

An experiment to show sound waves

My 6 year-old son asked me to explain the sound barrier. I think I'm ready to explain, but I wanted to know if I could add a little homemade experiment to show visually how soundwaves are generated. ...
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1answer
40 views

Derivation of the wave equation from Hooke's law- Generalization question

Following the derivation on the relevant Wikipedia page, I am having a bit of trouble moving from the following line, with the case of 3 particles in a row: $$ \frac{\partial^{2}}{\partial t^{2}} ...
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2answers
83 views

Do mechanical waves also carry momentum as well as energy? [closed]

I have read that electromagnetic waves carry momentum because they carry energy, while energy is equivalent to mass. So they carry momentum. But this explanation is in the context of special ...
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1answer
15 views

When should I use the phase constant in the equations of waves?

In the equations of Waves, I find that somewhere they have used the phase constant and somewhere haven't. While deriving the formula of standing wave they assumed two equation as $ y_1\; =\; y_0\, ...
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55 views

Is the speed of sound in air constant?

In Optics lecture we took a formula for the speed of a wave which is: $$ v=\frac{\omega}{k} $$ where $\omega$ is number of complete vibrations per second: $$ \omega=\frac{2\pi}{\tau} $$ and: $$ ...
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18 views

Conservation of energy in a sound wave

I have two ultrasonic transducers, an emitter and a receiver, and I'd like to know how the energy of the spherical wave is conserved. I guess the energy is proportional to its amplitude and it ...
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31 views

Problem in understanding the interpretation of $-T_0\frac{\partial\psi(z,t)}{\partial t}\,.$

I've been reading in Frank S Crawford's Waves, travelling waves and reflection. Here in the following quotes, the author interprets the term $\frac{\partial \psi(z,t)}{\partial z}$: The power ...
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43 views

Is the wave equation a periodic wave equation?

I have seen that in the derivation of wave equation, they always use the periodic property of waves in the derivation. But what about non-periodic waves? Do they have some different wave equation? Is ...
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1answer
50 views

Why are two speakers at the same volume and distance not twice as loud?

If I have two identical speakers facing me which are adjacent to eachother, playing the same music at the same volume, would it be any louder than having just one speaker at the same volume? If not, ...
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2answers
41 views

Is a spring shaped like a sine wave?

It's just a casual observation, so I wanted to check it: A regular spring, when not completely compressed, looks an awful lot like a sine wave. The idea of a circular shape stretched out in the third ...
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45 views

How does a tranverse wave propagate?

Sound waves can be understood as particles hitting each other and to conserve momentum the vibration travels in air. Each particle transfering it's momentum to the other until it reaches our ears. ...
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23 views

Why are photonics fibers called band gap fiber?

Why are photonics fibers called band gap fibers? Do the photonic fibers guide light inside the band gap or outside? What creates the band structure?
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14 views

How does an increase in temperature change the width of the central bright for Fraunhofer's single slit experiment?

When coherent light shines onto a metal sheet with a thin slit. There will be an interference pattern with a central bright fringe. If the temperature of the metal is increased, this causes linear ...
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1answer
38 views

Failure of Superposition principle at high amplitudes

Why does superposition principle fail at high amplitudes. Please answer with respect to transverse waves. If possible, plane progressive transverse waves at best.
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1answer
45 views

Why does phase of a wave change after reflecting from a denser medium?

Why does phase of a wave change when reflected from a denser medium, but no change takes place in phase during transmission?
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28 views

Energy of a wave

Energy density of a wave is given by $$E=\rho\omega^2A^2\cos^2(kx-\omega(t))$$.However for purposes of calculation we use the average of energy.i.e $$E=\frac{\rho\omega^2A^2}{2}$$WHY?
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1answer
35 views

is there explicit eqution between radiation electromagnetic wave and accelerator a charge that has curve moving path?

i had a basis question i read a rule in electromagnetic when a charge is moving and it has accelerator it will emit electromagnetic wave. now i want to find a explicit equation that describe this rule ...
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17 views

What is the highest frequency for ripples on water

I want to transmit sound vibrations as ripples on water, as an experimental audio delay effect. Can I make ripples at audio frequencies, that will travel over about 10cm or more? How about other ...
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1answer
24 views

Confusion about the shock growth

I am studying Hamilton's & Blackstock's Nonlinear Acoustics. One of the essential phenomena associated with a finite-amplitude (unidimensional, planar) sound propagation is building the shock due ...
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How is the Amplitude and intensity of a sound wave spilt when it splits into three waves with equal energy?

A sound of intensity $27I_o$ is produced at a point. It splits to travel along three different paths. Assume that sound energy is equally distributed among the three parts. Now what is the ...