Waves are disturbances that propagate through space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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22 views

What does invariant exactly mean and how does it get the invariant?

I have read many journal about simulation of regularized long wave. In numerical test section,many researcher use invariant of mass,momentum and energy to check accuracy of their method but i found ...
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42 views

What is the most general form for a plane wave?

In the context of electromagnetism, what is the most general form of a plane wave. My suggestion is: $$E=\sum_i{\vec E_ie^{i(\omega t+\vec k \cdot \vec r+\phi_i)}}$$ where $\vec E_i$ are constant ...
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1answer
30 views

can a wave on rope placed away from gravity go on forever?

we can make waves on a rope like we produce waves on a whip. assume that my rope(which is pretty long) is in space and i produce a wave on it at a point the rope is connected at the two ends. would ...
4
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2answers
292 views

Reflected and refracted light have same frequency as that of the incident light frequency. Why?

My text book says- When a monochromatic light is incident on a surface separating two media, the refracted and reflected light both have the same frequency as the incident frequency. Can anyone ...
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0answers
11 views

Resolving multipath interference when modelling radio wave propagation

I am creating a raytracer to model the propagation of radio waves from a simple router. I am assuming that the rays have a frequency of 2.4GHz and a velocity of the speed of light. The router has an ...
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3answers
67 views

What is meant by phase, phase difference, in (and out of) phase in wave terminology?

What is meant by phase, phase difference, in (and out of) phase in wave terminology? How do you get the relation $$y=A\sin(\omega t + \phi)?$$ Since the graph of sin function is identical to that of a ...
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0answers
11 views

Temperature and frequency relationship in case of closed end standing waves

I am trying to predict temperature based on the resonant frequency in Closed-End Air columns. I am using this formula: $$\tag{1} T = \frac{16 \times (f^2) \times L^2}{(2n -1)^2 \times \Gamma\times R} ...
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2answers
56 views

The Frequency of a Trill

My music teacher recently pointed out to me that, when performing a trill (alternating between two notes very quickly) the finger for the higher note should be placed slightly lower on the string than ...
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1answer
38 views

Why can't we define a unique wavelength for a short wave train? [duplicate]

Here we encounter a strange thing about waves; a very simple thing . . .namely, we cannot define a unique wavelength for a short wave train. Such a wave train does not have a definite wavelength; ...
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18 views

Power reflection and transmission coefficients? [on hold]

How do we define power reflection and transmission coefficients, and more specifically do we use average power?
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1answer
128 views

Are reflection and transmission coefficents real or complex?

Is it common practice to give reflection and transmission coefficients as the ratio of the respective waves with respect to the incident wave when written in complex form or real form? I have seen ...
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0answers
9 views

Simple Sound Waves Review [closed]

These are just simple test review questions. They are rather basis. I have them all solved, now I just need someone to check my work with. If anyone could solve these so that I could compare my ...
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0answers
27 views

What is a ray and what is the difference between rays and wavefronts? [closed]

What is a ray? What is the difference between rays and wavefronts?
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1answer
24 views

Can ultrasonic signal be guided through a tube?

I have an industrial application using an ultrasonic sensor to detect whether transparent film is present in a plastic ring. Ring minimum diameter is > 30mm. Sensing distance is 90mm. Sensor ...
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0answers
30 views

Help! I need to know the category and subcategorie [closed]

I make a project about how to decrease the tsunami wave.. And the generation of energy from it But they need the project category and sub-category...... I don't know what it should be! Engineering or ...
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2answers
81 views

Why does light travel as waves? [duplicate]

Why does light travel as waves instead of say just a straight line? What are the forces that make a light photon travel in a wavelike pattern?
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0answers
15 views

standing wave formation in a string of varying density

What will be the condition of standing wave formation in a string fixed at both end if density of string is uniformly increasing ?
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0answers
13 views

ratio between conduction current and displacement current

First, recall that Maxwell displacement current for a plane wave is $$ \vec j_D = \epsilon \partial_t \vec E = \epsilon \partial_t (\vec E_o cos(\vec k \cdot \vec r - \omega t)) = \epsilon \omega ...
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0answers
23 views

Does superposition principle apply to the velocity of each particle in a wave?

Superposition principle can be applied to find the net displacement of a particle when two waves interfere. But can it be applied in case of velocity? If so, then what happens to the velocity of the ...
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0answers
15 views

Can a patterned microwave beam with alternating frequencies be created?

Is there a way to create a patterned microwave beam with alternating frequencies such that, in the far field, from top to bottom of beam, there is repeated pattern of Wavelength one, Wavelength two, ...
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5answers
1k views

Why are electromagnetic waves called waves even though they don't travel through a medium?

If waves are defined as the oscillation of a medium, why are electromagnetic waves called waves as they do not need a medium to travel through?
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1answer
25 views

Natural frequencies

It's defined as the frequency that an object vibrates at when there is no driving force. What's a driving force? IS the natural frequency the frequency at which the atoms inside vibrate? People ...
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3answers
56 views

Definition of a normal mode?

What is the formal definition of a normal mode for a string? And how does this relate to the definition from e.g. wiki that seem to be applied to discrete systmes of particles only? Also on a string ...
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2answers
53 views

Why do we lose signal in elevators? [duplicate]

Whenever I am talking on my phone and walk into the elevator the call drops as soon as the doors close, and also the WiFi signal completely stops. Why does this happen? Note: I am asking this ...
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3answers
42 views

Sound waves during day and night

A man stands on the ground at a fixed distance from a siren which emits sound of fixed amplitude . The man hears the sound to be louder on a clear day than on a clear night. Why?
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1answer
26 views

Why do dispersive waves get wider?

Consider the two waves $$y_1=Acos(\omega_1 t+k_1 x), \tag{1}$$ $$y_2=Acos(\omega_2 t+k_2 x), \tag{2}$$ where $\omega_i=k_iv(k_i)$ for $i=1,2$ so we have a dispersive medium. Then if we take their ...
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1answer
22 views

Is difference in wave number always small?

Over the last few days I have been looking at a derivation of group velocity. The derivation is the one shown in this question Deriving group velocity. I have seen this derivation in many places, and ...
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2answers
71 views

Why do objects have resonance at natural frequency?

What actually is a natural frequency for an object and what makes it vibrate with increased amplitude when coupled with an external oscillator that matches the natural frequency?
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0answers
50 views

Derivation of group velocity?

In the standard simplified derivation of group velocity (which can be found here) we use two waves $$y_1=A\sin(K_1x-\omega_1 t)$$ $$y_2=A\sin(K_2x-\omega_2 t)$$ In the proof we then get ...
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0answers
77 views

What happens to the velocity distribution during constructive interference?

Two pulses(one inverted & having velocity in the opposite direction) moving towards each other with same wavelength & amplitude after undergoing destructive interference do reapper. Why? ...
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0answers
25 views

Are electrons matter waves? [duplicate]

While studying the de Broglie equations today I learned that electrons are particles that also act as matter waves. But in my text book I learned that there is a mathematical equation that says that ...
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1answer
76 views

Why can't transverse waves travel through a liquid?

Can someone explain why a longitude wave can pass through the liquid, but a transverse wave can't. And can someone recommend some good animation of these processes.
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1answer
28 views

Why doesn't the speed of the wind have an effect on the apparent frequency?

A boy is standing in front of stationary train. The train blows a horn of $400Hz$ frequency . If the wind is blowing from train to boy at speed at $30m/s$, the apparent frequency of sound heard by the ...
4
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0answers
70 views

Mathematical defintion of a standing wave? [closed]

I know that a standing wave is the superposition of two waves of equal amplitude and wavelength, moving in opposite directions. But I am looking for a more mathematical defintion of such a wave. The ...
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4answers
85 views

Energy of a wave and Planck formula

Especially from this post I understand that the energy of a wave is directly proportional to the amplitude of that wave squared. Therefore, we can determine the total energy of a wave by summing the ...
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1answer
63 views

Why is it mandatory to make the string taut/stretched for sending pulse/wave?

In order to send a pulse and to propagate it, the string must be under tension.$^\text{1}$ Why is the tension necessary? Why should the string be stretched/taut for the transmission of the pulse? ...
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0answers
20 views

Fresnel equations of S and T waves and Isofrequecy Curves: Feeling confused

First of all sorry for my (probably) bad english. I've been studying propagation of light in anisotropic media from the Born and Wolf and from Landau "electrodynamics in continuous media" and I'm ...
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0answers
22 views

Will a longitudinal wave propagate “forever” in a tube?

I understand that the wave will lose energy due to "friction" between the, lets say, water molecules, but in my mind at least the biggest loss of energy in a wave is normally the dispersion of it. ...
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1answer
56 views

What sort of waves are produced by tuning forks?is it transverse, longitudinal or both?

We often know tuning forks are used to to produce wave in various experiments that we do in lab. but the matter of concern is what sort of waves are produced by it? is it transverse, longitudinal or ...
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1answer
54 views

Mechanism of propagation of pulse in a string

If you give one end of a stretched string a single up-and-down jerk, a wave in the form of a single pulse travels along the string. This pulse & its motion can occur because the string is under ...
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0answers
18 views

Equivalency of Q Factor Definitions

The Q factor is defined (seemingly) as $$Q=2\pi\frac{\mathrm{energy \, \, stored}}{\mathrm{energy \, \,dissipated \, \, per \, \, cycle}}$$ however on Wikipedia is says that the Q factor can be ...
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0answers
31 views

In Young's double slit experiment how can we determine the shape of fringes formed?

Does the shape of fringe change if the type of source is changed (point source or extended source) or if the relative position of slits is changed (both lie on a line either horizontal or vertical to ...
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0answers
22 views

Non-linearity of a guitar pickup

I basically understand induction and why a pickup generates a signal. (From: http://www.brighthubengineering.com/consumer-appliances-electronics/64277-the-physics-behind-the-electric-guitar/) What ...
16
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3answers
3k views

Can light emit light?

How and why does the Huygens principle really work? I mean, does it always work? The Huygens principle: Every point on a wave-front may be considered a source of secondary spherical wavelets ...
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2answers
65 views

Field Vectors and satisfying Maxwell's equations

If I have an electric field that its direction is parallel to the direction of the wave propagation, it will not satisfy Gauss's law for vacuum. However we can say it satisfies Gauss's law for ...
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1answer
20 views

Why do circular “snowrafts” form on a lake during a blizzard?

I was just out walking along Lake Michigan during a snowstorm and I noticed that the snow was clumping into these interesting circular "snowrafts". They all seem to be about 6 to 10 feet across with a ...
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1answer
35 views

Diffraction grating problem [closed]

We have 8 slits, each separated from its neighbour by $ 0.05$mm. We use light of wavelength $576$nm. The problem is to calculate at what angle the first minimum occurs. The answer is given: ...
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0answers
29 views

Fresnel to Fraunhofer limit

I'm puzzled about what happens when distance L from obstacle to screen is continuously increased from a small value (Fresnel diffraction) to infinity (Fraunhofer diffraction). Please consider four ...
4
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1answer
52 views

What is a full cycle in damped oscillation?

Maybe it seems a dumb question, but I can't understand what the cycle in a damped oscillation is? Let's take an example: In harmonic motion, one cycle is the smallest distinguishable part of wave ...
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1answer
59 views

Why is beat described as a “relatively slow amplitude-modulation of oscillation”?

Excerpts from A.P.French's Vibrations & Waves: . . . It may be seen that the combined displacement can be fitted within an envelope defined by the pair of equations$$ x = 2\mathit{A} ...