Waves are disturbances that propagate throush space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Is there a specific branch of physics that studies waves?

Is there a branch of physics that studies waves and how they propagate through air, wires etc.?
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Spherical wave amplitude near to source

Let us assume, I generate spherical waves from a point source, of the form $f(t)=\sin(t)$. At $r$ distance, it will be $\sin(t)/r$. Let us take $r = 0.1$ for example. Then, at this distance, the ...
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What is the physical explanation for the phase relationship between acoustic pressure and particle velocity in plane and spherical waves?

I've been looking around for a decent physical explanation of the differences in the phase relationships between acoustic pressure and particle velocity in different types of waves. Mathematical ...
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What the phase constant difference required for sources located at the same location?

Here is what my teacher wrote on her notes: Let's say there are two speakers located at x=0m emitting sound waves of same $\omega$ and same A. PHASE CONSTANT DIFFERENCES If A < A'<2A: there is ...
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General equation of a wave

My book says that functions which represent a wave motions satisfy the differential equation : $$ \frac{\partial^2 y} {\partial^2t} = v^2 \frac{\partial^2 y} {\partial^2x} $$ where $v$ is the ...
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Modulus of rigidity inside the water

Transverse wave can't travel inside the water. It travels in solid and on the surface of water because they have modulus of rigidity. What is modulus of rigidity? and why there is no modulus of ...
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What is the mathematical equation for a sine wave? [closed]

(Guitar player and programmer here, don't know much about math. So go easy ;) ). I recently learned that an audio sine wave is called that way because it is of the shape of the graph of a sine ...
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55 views

Equation of motion for system of springs

I need to find the equations of motion for the following system. If $x_1$ is $m_1$'s extension and $x_2$ is $m_2$'s, then, I feel like for $m_1$ we just need to consider $x_1$ giving $$m_1 a_1 = ...
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Sound Source Power Formula Approximation

A sound source emits waves with a wavelength of 25 cm. 50 m away, the waves have an amplitude of 4 micrometers. It's 20 ° C outside and the density of air is 1.3 kg/m^3. What is the power of the ...
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34 views

What are overtones and how do they relate to harmonics?

Problem 43. Two organ pipes, a pipe of fundamental frequency 440 Hz, closed at one end, and a pipe of fundamental frequency 660 Hz, open at both ends, produce overtones. Which choice below ...
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Oscillation of air particles and speed of sound wave

A sound wave is essentially air particles oscillating parallel to the direction of travel of the wave. We learnt that $v = f\lambda$, where $v$ is the speed of the wave, $f$ is the frequency of the ...
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38 views

Why are speakers louder in a corner?

You can test this very easily using an iPhone's speaker pointed towards a wall. When the speaker is more than an inch or two away, it is normal volume. However, when the speaker is nearly touching the ...
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Finding the distance between two osclilating particles in a wave

Assume a wave function $\psi = \psi(x,t)$ where $x$ is position from the starting point $(0,0)$ and $t$ is time. Two oscillating points A and B are located at $x_1$ and $x_2$ respectively with $x_2 ...
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34 views

How does underwater sound sound?

I have been thinking about underwater sounds (i.e. sounds produced and recorded underwater), what exactly the water does, and how to emulate this effect. Imagine a sound played underwater (e.g. from ...
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Proving standing waves equation for open-open pattern [closed]

My teacher assigned me to prove open-closed and closed-closed standing waves patterns using math. With closed-closed, it was fairly easy: $$\begin{align} D(x=0,t)&=0\\ D(x=L,t)&=0=2A\sin(kx) ...
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Do waves accelerate?

Typically we think of acceleration as a particulate property but a previous question on this forum got me thinking. If we think of a wave increasing its velocity by increasing its energy/frequency ...
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Sound system and Temperature Effects

You arrange a patio with a sound system. Ignore all sound reflections. If you are at a certain location on the patio, you can find the two lowest frequencies you will experience total destructive ...
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Speakers and Changes in Temperature

Let's say that there is a speaker that oscillates the same way. Now, let's say there is a sudden drop in temperature. I know the speed of sound would drop. But, what will drop, the wavelength or the ...
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Sound waves travelling in air and the amount of air affected by the wave

If there is a sound wave travelling in the air, will the amount of air transported by the wave be proportional to the intensity? Here is my answer: yes, because as the energy of the wave is related ...
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Can we measure the depth of water by scattering water?

Suppose we release an object and make it fall on the surface of water, then the scatter of water is recorded, Taking some observations, can we calculate the depth of the water by analyzing the ...
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Conditions for characterizing a wave as plane wave

Given a wave equation, say for example $\Psi(x,y,z,t) = a \cos\left(\omega t -\vec{k}\cdot \vec{r} \right)$, what conditions should be met for $\Psi$ to represent a plane wave?
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Doppler effect and acceleration's impact

Can anyone explain why they say Doppler effect does not depend on acceleration? Would having acceleration not affect the frequency? If the source emits the first circular wave, moving at 50 m/s ...
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Definition of transmission and reflection probability

This is a basic question, but it does not seem to be well defined anywhere. Generally, two terms are mixed somewhat randomly: transmission PROBABILITY and transmission coefficient. So to be clear, ...
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Physical meaning of imaginary part of Electric field?

As far as I know (or I thought I knew), if we have an electric field $$\mathbf{E}=\mathbf{E_0}\cos(\omega t - kx),$$ we can define it as the real part of $$\mathbf{E}=Re(\mathbf{E_0}e^{i(\omega t - ...
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Why do 2.4GHz frequencies offer greater range than 5GHz routers?

I would've thought that as 5GHz is a higher frequency, and it carries more energy, it would be able to pass through walls much more easily compared to a 2.4GHz frequency- similar to how short ...
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61 views

Is the photon first a wave, then a particle? [duplicate]

When the 'photon' is emitted, it would reason that the result of the energy fluctuation that creates 'it' rather is created as an energy wave, which when measured by us or a surface, it 'becomes' as a ...
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Coherent sources for interference

Regular interference pattern can be observed if the two wave sources are coherent. Two sources are coherent if they have the same frequency and constant phase difference. Could someone please ...
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Determining the decay constant for a damped wave [closed]

My question is short and simple. If a damped, travelling wave (say on a string) could be described as $y\left( x,t\right) =Ae^{-\gamma x}\sin \left( kx-\omega t\right)$ how could/would one ...
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Wave Packets, Group velocity, and Phase velocity [duplicate]

Mathematically, you find that the wave function of a particle $\Psi (x,t)$ moves with the same velocity as the velocity of the particle ($v_{particle} = v_{group}$). Is there a reason why the ...
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277 views

Does the speed at which sound travel depend on the volume (amplitude) of the sound?

Lets say you have a plank is you hit it once and get t time if you hit is 2x as hard will it travel t/2? will it be the same or will it travel only slightly faster?
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Why does a wave actually diffract?

I know that waves diffract around a slit and this is due to the Huygens-Fresnel principle. But I never understand this in an intuitive wave that why does a wave become a spherical wave front at the ...
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Calculate signal strength received by an Ultrasonic Transducer [closed]

Below is an image showing transducer A transmitting a signal with an amplitude of 3000mV, I am trying to calculate the amplitude of the signal received by transducer B in mV, I understand that there ...
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Convention about delta x in Waves Interference

They seem to adopt a convention that delta x must always be positive. Otherwise, there is no way to know what the phase difference of the sources actually means. Does a 90° difference mean that ...
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Reflected waves and phase changes

If a wave passes from a lightweight string to a higher density string, we say that the reflected wave has a pi phase change. Can we say that it has minus pi phase change? If yes, why would that not ...
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Intense of liner polarized wave: with a polarizer vs. without a polarizer differences

We had this experiment in which we measured the intense of linear polarized wave - with and without a polarizer. I noticed that without the polarizer the intense was slightly lower than with the ...
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Effects of energy loss for a damped wave

I have two questions: 1) When a lightly damped wave losses all it's energy, must it maintain it's wavelength before it dies? 2) When a travelling sine wave is damped, can the peaks be skewed from ...
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Can we represent Simple Harmonic function as triangular waves?

Having studied the topic recently I found out that simple harmonic motion can represented well with sine and cosine functions.Take for example a pendulum swing which could look like : and the ...
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What happens to light at sharp points? [closed]

At the tip of the sharp point shown, what will happen to light incident on it. This curiosity was invoked by a friend and also my childhood of watching shiny pointed swords in cartoons. Original ...
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Why does frequency increase as the length of an open air column shortens?

I am curious as to why the frequency of a wavelength increases as an open air column becomes smaller in length. Is it because an open air column will always contain half a wavelength, therefore if the ...
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The Effect of Tortoise Coordinates

Referring particularly to http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/9909056 in regard to the wave equation for Schwarzschild-AdS black holes (p.4), I'm trying to understand tortoise coordinates. So starting ...
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Dimensions of wave equation

If you take the homogenous wave equation: $$-\Delta_x u(x,t) + \frac{1}{c^2} \frac{\partial^2 u}{\partial^2 t} (x,t) \ = \ 0 \ \ \mathrm{in} \ \Omega \times (0, \infty),$$ with some proper initial- ...
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How to calculate the dispersion relation for a wave equation with non-constant speed of wave propagation?

Specifically, it is a one-dimensional wave equation for waves on a string with a non-constant cross-section, i. e. $$S(x)=S_1+S_2 \cos{2x}; \qquad c(x)=\sqrt{F/\rho\, S(x)}.$$ Separating the variables ...
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Skin depth of current density in magnetic conductor at boundary between two different materials

Imagine a magnetic conductor with a cylindrical cross section, surrounded by a coil with a time varying current of $$I = I_0\cdot \cos (2\pi f t)$$ The conductor is split into two parts, the first ...
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What Exactly is a Shock Wave?

The Wikipedia defintion of a shock wave pretty much sums up all I've found online about what a shock wave is: A shock wave is a type of propagating disturbance. Like an ordinary wave, it carries ...
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1answer
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How to understand “the speed of propagation of the condition of constant phase”?

I still can't understand that the phase can be a constant until now. If the phase is constant, from the $$y(x,t) = a \times \sin(phase)$$ the shape of wave will be a line parallel to x-axis.But I ...
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Displacement of an object due to opposite and equal forces acting at different times?

This question is about mechanical waves in solids, the speed at which forces propagate through solids, and the displacement that might occur due to unequal starting times of equally sized forces. ...
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amplification of magnetic field

can we by any means amplify magnetic signal as we can with electric signal. As both electric and magnetic field can be represented in the form of a wave the analogy seems to be natural. I want the ...
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What happens when a slow wave reaches lower hybrid resonance?

Lower hybrid resonance occurs when $n_{\perp}^2$ goes to infinity, and it occurs only for the slow wave solution, not the fast wave. Since $n_{\perp}$ is proportional to $k_{\perp}$, and $k = \frac{2 ...
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How damaging is light?

On Surely You're Joking Mr Feynman, when talking about the Trinity test, the author states: the only thing that could really hurt your eyes (bright light can never hurt your eyes) is ultraviolet ...
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Interaction of ocean waves and currents

I was on a small island recently near high tide. As the tide started to go out, a tidal pond emptied into the ocean through a narrow channel with a strong outgoing current. There was also wind on ...