Waves are disturbances that propagate through space and time. Classically, they travelled through a medium, disturbing the particles but not changing their mean position. Electromagnetic waves/particle-waves need no medium; they are disturbances in their respective fields.

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Wave speed derivation using parabola [on hold]

The derivation below uses a circle approximation of the curve. How would you do the derivation with a parabolic approximation instead?
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29 views

Can a flow of current be produced in a wire if its is bombarded with Electromagnetic waves?

If you have a conducting wire and you bombarded it with EM waves, is there a frequency (lower then the threshold frequency to liberate the electrons) that would induce a current within the wire. I ...
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68 views

How do light waves get their size?

An atom or (small) molecule has the size of about 100pm. Elektromagnetic waves range from about 0.1nm up to 1 km. The most common way waves (like light) are caused by 'jumping' electrons to another ...
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11 views

How is the Rayleigh criterion connected to the Abbe limit

I am interrested whether one can derive a formula for the point resolution (like Abbe did) of an optical system from the Rayleigh criterion (without the use of small angle approximation i.e. ...
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1answer
26 views

Solution of Burgers' equation in preshock region

According to Hamilton's & Blackstock's Nonlinear acoustics (Section 4.5.4) the solution of Burgers' equation of the form: $$ \frac{\partial P}{\partial \sigma} - \frac{1}{\Gamma}\frac{\partial^2 ...
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1answer
24 views

Does a reflected evanescent wave grow in amplitude?

When considering an evanescent wave travelling in a region between two regions where the solution takes the form of a travelling wave from the maths we have a forwards travelling wave that decreases ...
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319 views

Momentum of transverse waves on a string

In general, if a wave carries energy density $u$ with velocity $v$, it also carries momentum density $u/v$. I've seen this explicitly shown for electromagnetic waves and (longitudinal) sound waves. ...
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2answers
248 views

Wave speed derivation for small amplitudes

The above is a derivation for the wave speed equation in my physics textbook. However, I've read online that this equation is only true for waves with small amplitudes. I do not see where this ...
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1answer
30 views

light and sound speed [on hold]

why is the speed of light faster in water than it is in air? And why is the speed of sound slower in liquid than it is in air? Is its difference is related to wave's appearance? like transverse wave ...
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12 views

How much heat can ULF RF waves can generate? [closed]

How much heat can ULF RF waves can generate? Can the heat generated from RF waves burn of insects wings which are in flying state?
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1answer
38 views

Calculating wavelengths from angles in a diffraction grating? [closed]

I am having some problems calculating wavelengths from some given information about a grating spectrum. A diffraction grating with a spacing of 3μm is used in a spectrometer to investigate the ...
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0answers
10 views

Is it possible for wifi range extenders to deteriorate the quality of the original signal?

I am aware that wifi range extenders work by receiving and then re-transmitting signals, but does this process 'steal' any of the signal that I would usually use?
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the ratio of intensity of two waves is 9:1. They are producing interference. The ratio of maximum and minimum intensities will be? [closed]

I tried solving the question using various ways. What is the correct technique to solve this question?
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2answers
32 views

Why do standing waves only occur in some specific conditions?

In the string which has both end fixed then the end point have to be $n (\lambda/2)$ from the beginning point in order to have standing waves. I know it has to start with a node and end with a node, ...
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1answer
42 views

Does amplitude of electric field and magnetic field vary with distance in em waves?

Does the amplitude of electric field and magnetic field of an em wave vary with distance?
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1answer
40 views

Mathematical definition of wavefront in case of non harmonic waves

What is the general mathematical definition of wavefront? Wavefront is the surface where, at fixed time, the phase is constant But for non-harmonic waves we cannot talk about phase as the ...
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0answers
39 views

advantages/disadvantages of a cylindrical microwave oven cavity in comparison to a rectangular cavity

Why are rectangular cavities preferred for standard microwave ovens with a frequency of 2.45 Ghz? What is the reason that you can hardly find a circular cavity? What are the disadvantages of ...
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43 views

Why does light propagate rectilinearly? [closed]

I found a question: Light propagates rectilinearly because of its: a. Frequency b. Velocity c. Wavelength d. Wave nature. Now the answer given in the reference is wave ...
4
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2answers
44 views

Are two waves coherent iff they have the same frequency?

The essential property that two waves must own in order to interfere with each other is to be coherent. Two waves are coherent if their phase difference $\phi_2-\phi_1$ does not change in time ...
4
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1answer
59 views

Effect of motion of medium on frequency

Will the frequency observed by a stationary observer will remain same if only the medium between the source and observer is moving?(ie. both source and observer are at rest and wind is blowing from ...
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35 views

Can I measure the mode shape frequency of a metal frame with a sound meter

If I 'ping' a metal frame it will resonate in many different mode shapes with different frequencies. I can see those shapes by doing a modal FEA analysis. When I use a sound meter to measure the ...
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17 views

How to convert from overtone to harmonics and vice versa?

I was given this question: If the pipe length in a tube is 1.9 m, at the air temperature inside the tube is 28 °C, determine the fundamental frequency of the note played, fourth harmonic and the ...
3
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59 views

How can I prove that antinodes are present at both open ends of organ pipe mathematically?

I know that for anti node to be formed the magnitude of displacement should be maximum at there. For standing waves in an organ pipe, the boundary conditions are such that anti nodes are formed at ...
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1answer
65 views

How I can prove refractive index in an environment is this? [closed]

in "Applied Quantum Mechanics" by A.F.J. Levi, is a problem that I couldn't solve it can any solve it: if electrical filed is: $$ \mathbf{E}\left(\mathbf{r}, \omega \right) ...
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1answer
34 views

Why are phase constants of incident, reflected and transmitted simple waves equal in absolute value?

I was reading Griffiths's book of electrodynamics and i got stuck on the ninth chapter, where he analyses the propagation of a simple wave - fixed form and constant velocity - using travelling pulses ...
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1answer
37 views

Subtracting Audio from a Song with Multiple Forms

This question may start oozing into the realm of copyright infringement, but let's discuss the theory first and foremost. I have a song with vocal and orchestral accompaniment from a well-known movie ...
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1answer
25 views

How does string tension influence the harmonic spectrum?

Hey there fellow physicists & musicians! I have a question both physics and music related. How does the string tension affect the sound spectrum? More precisely, how do the respective ...
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3answers
26 views

When two waves interfere, how to calculate the amplitude of the wave?

As the theory of superposition of waves express the amplitudes of the interfering waves do algebraically sum up. But when we sum up the the total energies of a particle doing a harmonic motion due to ...
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1answer
27 views

Inertial Waves - Why neglecting the advecting term?

I'm trying to derive the dispersion relation for Inertial waves. In Cartesian coordinates: Inviscid and incompressible fluid is rotating uniformly with Angular Velocity: $\Omega = (0, 0, \Omega)$ ...
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2answers
43 views

Explanation of ray caustics in E&M

My understanding (now) of a real caustic is that it is envelope of curves or ray-paths that arise due to reflection or refraction from the medium/manifold. My main question is, I am seeing the term ...
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2answers
32 views

Will these two coherent electromagnetic waves be in phase?

My question is how will I know if two coherent electromagnetic waves are in phase based on their phase difference. I just solved a problem which stated... Two coherent sources A & B send ...
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2answers
38 views

Why doesn't the group velocity of a plasma EM wave equal the phase velocity here?

For plasma EM waves we have the dispersion relation $$\omega^2=\omega_p^2+c^2k^2$$ where the plasma frequency $$\omega_p^2=\frac{n_e e^2}{\epsilon_0 m_e}$$ One can show that $v_p v_g=c^2$, i.e., the ...
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0answers
17 views

How to create planar acoustic waves?

The only way I can think of for creating planar acoustic waves is using a 2D phased array of transmitters, but even then the planar wave is not so planar (depends on the interference pattern, which ...
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2answers
42 views

Wave speed derivation

The wave speed derivation approximates the wave as a circle. It uses that to know that a=v^2/R. However, numerous functions can approximate the wave. A straight line, x^2, x^3, etc. If I used those I ...
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How does a linearly polarized spin 1/2 wave look like?

Spin 1 waves are easy to illustrate and a linearly polarized spin 2 wave looks like this, but what is the counterpart for a spin 1/2 wave?
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275 views

Why does the length of a wind instrument affect it's pitch?

I understand how length of a string on any string instrument affects it's pitch, but I don't understand how a short wind instrument produces a high pitch.
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+50

why interference pattern changes with given relation when the source slit changes?

Why for interference condition to be seen the dependence relation should be like $${\frac{s}{S}}<{\frac{\lambda}{d}}$$.Where $s$ is width of source slit and $S$ is the distance between the source ...
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1answer
59 views

what do we mean by speed of light dependent on direction?

I have a statement in textbook saying "When the speed of light is independent of direction,the secondary waves are spherical". Can someone tell when it is dependent on direction and how the secondary ...
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3answers
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why doesn't pitch or volume change the speed of sound? [closed]

If sound is a propagated by particles hitting each other in a tranverse wave, why doesn't pitch affect the speed of sound? Since frequency is the speed at which the particles hit in a period of time, ...
4
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1answer
78 views

Are all diffusion-like processes described as wave-like in relativity-compatible formulations?

Citing from Wikipedia's article on relativistic heat conduction: For most of the last century, it was recognized that Fourier equation (and its more general Fick's law of diffusion) is in ...
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2answers
107 views

Pressure standing wave nodes at the end of the open side of a tube

I do not understand why standing sound waves can be formed in a one-side or two-side open tube. Consider a one-side open tube. In particular how does the reflection of the wave at the open end occur? ...
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1answer
12 views

Conditions imposed in wave reflection and transmission in one dimension

In the study of trasmission and reflection of waves in one dimension I do not understand completely the meaning of the conditions imposed. Consider an impulse $\xi(x,t)$ moving on a rope linked with ...
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Are mechanical energy of an element of a rope and energy density constant in the case of mechanical waves?

I'm confused about energy driven by a wave. Consider a sinousoidal wave moving in a rope. In my view each element $dm$ of the rope follows a simple harmonic motion in time. That means that the ...
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1answer
19 views

How do you tell direction and what's positive or negative in wave functions?

$$y = 1.00 \sin(5x − 2t)$$ So if I'm given $y(x,t)$, it's pretty clear what the amplitude, angular frequency and $k$ value appear to be. However, when I'm doing homework problems, the angular ...
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2answers
188 views

Standing wave on a rope fixed at both sides: minus sign in the reflected wave

I'm studying stationary waves on a rope fixed at both sides. In some books I find that the wave function studied is the sum of incident wave $\xi_1(x,t)$ and of the reflected wave $\xi_2(x,t)$. ...
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1answer
12 views

Trasversal wave on a rod velocity

What is the velocity of a trasversal wave on a metal rod? Does it depend on the shear modulus $G$ $$v_{t}=\sqrt{\frac{G}{\rho}}$$ Or on the tension $T$ of the rod? ...
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27 views

Is disturbance propagation velocity equal to wave velocity in a solid body?

How do the disturbance propagation velocity and wave propagation velocity relate to each other? To explain my question in details I will describe the following situation from the theory of acoustic ...
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14 views

Half-life time of audible acoustic waves under given circumstances - is this model valid?

I need to find the half-life time of acoustic waves, given the information, that they are audible as long as their intensity $I > 10^{-12} W/m^2$ and the maximal distance $x$, where they are still ...
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Intensity of the acoustic waves coming out of the speakers at the very beginnig of their “journey”

According to the formula, the intensity of acoustic waves at any given point is: $$I(R) = \frac{P}{4\pi(R)^2}$$ where P is the power of the source and R is the radius of the force (Assuming that the ...