The wavelength of a sinusoidal wave is the spatial period of the wave—the distance over which the wave's shape repeats, and the inverse of the spatial frequency or wavenumber. Determined by considering the distance between consecutive corresponding points of the same phase, such as crests. Use for ...

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0answers
9 views

Infrared Camera spectral filtering with an uncooled camera? [on hold]

I have been doing experiments with thermal cameras and stumbled upon CO2 detection. Having ordered a filter I was full of joy and immediately tried it out - nothing happened. So I talked to the ...
2
votes
1answer
85 views

Is meters per second equivalent to seconds per meter?

I know this question is probably ridiculous, but bear with me for a moment. This thought emerged while I was converting between nm and wave numbers ($\rm cm^{-1}$). In order to prove this conversion, ...
0
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1answer
114 views

Refractive index and color

Does the color of an object have anything to do with its refractive index, and if so, what is the relation? I tried googling this and searching through the questions on stack exchange, but I haven't ...
0
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0answers
19 views

debroglie wavelength and wavelength of particle [on hold]

QESTION: Consider the potential field $V(x,y)$ which is $0$ & $-V$ resp in the regions of $y\gt {0}$ and $y\lt {0}$ respectively. Let $\theta$ and ${{\theta}'}$ be angle of incidence and ...
64
votes
8answers
73k views

Why does a remote car key work when held to your head/body?

I was trying to unlock my car with a keyfob, but I was out of range. A friend of mine said that I have to hold the transmitter next to my head. It worked, so I tried the following later that day: ...
4
votes
3answers
70 views

Where does the energy of a photon trying to escape a black hole go?

I've heard "light cannot escape a black hole" explained several ways. One is that if a photon inside the event horizon tries to escape a black hole it loses energy to gravity. As it loses energy its ...
0
votes
2answers
328 views

What is the significance of wavelength when referring to light (in layman's terms)?

Without any equations or complex terminology, I simply want to understand in complete layman's terms what the significance of a single photon's wavelength is. People say that microwave radiation's ...
0
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0answers
27 views

Detecting position of electrons [duplicate]

To detect particles like electrons, why would the accuracy of the position determined be affected by the wavelength of EM wave used?
0
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1answer
34 views

is there explicit eqution between radiation electromagnetic wave and accelerator a charge that has curve moving path?

i had a basis question i read a rule in electromagnetic when a charge is moving and it has accelerator it will emit electromagnetic wave. now i want to find a explicit equation that describe this rule ...
1
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2answers
248 views

Is light getting another color when travelling through a prism?

When white light travels through a prism the speed of this light is slowed down. Now there is a relation between speed of light, frequency and wavelength. So when a red light of 700nm enters a prism ...
1
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0answers
49 views

Calculating Natural Broadening of Emission Lines

I'm trying to demonstrate the small effect of Natural Broadening as compared to other types of broadening (Doppler, Stark, van der Waals, etc.) and my calculations don't match the accepted values. My ...
1
vote
1answer
127 views

Harmonics and the frequencies

Let's say we had a pipe which was closed on one side and open on the other. We can find the wavelength for the first harmonic. To find the second harmonic we just add one more antinode and find a new ...
1
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0answers
49 views

Heisenberg theory of uncertainty

I was watching a video on YouTube about uncertainty theory of Heisenberg it said that there is a relation between momentum (multiple of mass and speed) and wave length. And the relation is that if ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

What is the relationship between the size of a slit and wavelength in diffraction? [duplicate]

Almost everywhere I see the statement that diffraction gets stronger when the size of the slit is comparable to the wavelength. I would just like to know the logic behind. Could anyone help me please? ...
0
votes
2answers
72 views

Wavelength and Frequency (Wave travel)

It is true when a wave is traveling in a constant velocity, there is an inverse relationship between a wavelength and frequency. For example, if a wavelength is increasing, frequency should decrease ...
15
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7answers
3k views

Why is air invisible?

I think that something is invisible if it's isolated particles are smaller than the wavelength of visible light. Is this correct? Why is air invisible? What about other gases and fumes which are ...
0
votes
1answer
380 views

How does a longer wavelength penetrate deeper with Rayleigh waves?

I'm struggling slightly to understand this idea. I've slowly been building up an explanation, so at this stage it might be just some confirmation I'm looking for, but also some guidance if I'm off ...
3
votes
3answers
97 views

Can particles at rest have wave nature?

Can particles have wave nature even when they are at rest? I think this is possible due to the formation of standing waves
-1
votes
1answer
75 views

Characteristics of electromagnetic radiation

Is it possible to change the wavelength of an electromagnetic wave without a change of medium?
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3answers
434 views

Why does sound wave suffer more diffraction than light waves generally?

Why do sound waves suffer more diffraction than light waves generally ? I would like more of a logical explanation rather than mathematical .
1
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1answer
175 views

Quantum properties of objects with zero velocity

What would the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and De Broglie wavelength be for a baseball that is not moving (i.e has zero velocity)? Also, since macroscopic objects like baseballs have extremely ...
-1
votes
1answer
26 views

Is there any naturally occurring light wave with a constant frequency that has a terminable decimal. [closed]

I was wanting to think of a natural unit of time, if one exists, that is known exactly. I started thinking about it with the Voyager plaque and the 21 cm Hydrogen line (HL). When I looked into the HL, ...
4
votes
1answer
81 views

Beating the Diffraction Limit with NSOM

I am trying to understand exactly why we can beat the diffraction limit when using near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM). For those who aren't familiar with NSOM, check out this article: ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

Normal Modes for Standing Waves in 1-D Acoustic Ducts with Arbitrary (but real) Impedance Jumps

Let's say we have a 1-D duct, such as this: Where $Z_i \equiv \frac{P}{US}$ is the acoustic impedance, L is the length of the duct in question, and S is the area of the cross-section. In general, ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Blue hues in Aluminum mirror

[][] When depositing Aluminium sometimes I end up with a bluish hue to my film especially when changing angle of view. I use a very high rate of deposition and low temperature. What would cause this?
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Is frequency at normal inversely proprtional to wavelength?

since speed of sound is constant for normal conditions(conditions where speed of sound is normal) , can anybody provide me the mathametical proof of why frequency is linearly and inversely ...
1
vote
3answers
102 views

Can speed of light be $c$ in air or other medium?

I know that the speed of light in a vacuum is $c\sim 3\ 10^8\ \mathrm{m/s}$, but I also know that speed of light in a medium (e.g., air) is less than that in vacuum. Special relativity says that ...
-1
votes
1answer
72 views

Where are the electron exchanges happening in solar cell physics when considering the photon?

When considering solar panel physics, are we taking an electron from Light(photon), or is the energy of Light causing an electron to jump in said solar cells through excitation? Is the photon even ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

optoelectronics-smallest wavelength of light

Sorry this maybe a stupid question , but i need to know: A few minutes ago i have read an article about optoelectronics: worlds first optical single atom switch The writer of the article ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

What do we mean by wavelength of any electromagnetic wave?

What do we mean by wavelength of EMW? Wavelength of oscillating electric field or the oscillating magnetic field? Or is it that both the electric and magnetic field waves have same wavelength? If ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

Why do microwave ovens use radiation with such long wavelength?

According to Wikipedia: Consumer ovens usually use 2.45 gigahertz (GHz)—a wavelength of 12.2 centimetres (4.80 in). Typically, I put the dish inside the oven in its center. I suspect most ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Why does the wavelength gets shorter in the denser medium in refraction? [duplicate]

In the refraction, the wavelength gets shorter if it enters denser medium. Why is that happening? Is it just a phenomenon?
3
votes
1answer
132 views

Wavelength of electromagnetic waves [closed]

How can you determine experimentally the wave length of an electromagnetic wave having wave length in the visible range and that in the ultra violet range?
0
votes
1answer
60 views

Light's wavelength and pathlength

I see this 2 words (wavelength and path length) used interchangeably. As interpreted here: 'The total power density arriving at the surface depends on the absorption path length of the light ...
0
votes
4answers
371 views

Why does light bend?

I have just read about dispersion of light by a prism and the thing which i donnot understand is that WHY does the light bend at all? Through prisms and slabs? I came to know that red light has the ...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

Wavelength, frequency, and radars [closed]

I'm doing a high school paper on the effects of frequency alterations on a radar image. Can someone recommend a book which I can use?
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Why do radio stations have ranges

If you have been on a long car ride you would know that the signal of a radio station becomes weaker and weaker and then stops. But since radio waves are just a wavelength of the electromagnetic ...
0
votes
5answers
72 views

Dependence of Color of Light on Wavelength?

Recently i saw a question here which asked "what does the color of light depend on as we percieve it?".Now some members answered that if you see an object from any other medium it appears the same ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

What is meant by infinite wavelength?

1#When an electromagnetic wave propagates in a plasma, with increase in plasma density the phase velocity ($v=\frac{\omega}{k}$) of wave increases. So at cut-off point $k=0$, and phase velocity ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Wavelength of light in a gravitational field

I'm having a light source which can emit a particular wavelength of light, on an extremely massive planet. Light will be affected by gravity, So will the wavelength of the light source increase? As ...
27
votes
10answers
30k views

What determines color — wavelength or frequency?

What determines the color of light -- is it the wavelength of the light or the frequency? (i.e. If you put light through a medium other than air, in order to keep its color the same, which one would ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Matter waves and de Broglie wave length

The wavelength of a particle of momentum p is calculated using De Broglie relation. The de Broglie relation was postulated for what is called a matter waves. Now according to the statistical ...
2
votes
3answers
131 views

What experimental evidence shows that sound velocity is the same for all wavelengths?

I'm studying sound waves with Halliday's book, and after reading the whole chapter, one of the questions suggested was: What is the experimental evidence that allows the assumption that the sound ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

Is speed of sound really constant?

Does not speed of sound actually depend on the frequency and/or amplitude of the waves? If so, why it is constant?
3
votes
1answer
108 views

Can the de Broglie wavelength become infinite?

i am new to the concept of de Broglie wavelength. We all know that $\lambda=\frac hp$ and $E_\text{kin}=\frac{p^2}{2m}$ implies $p=\sqrt{2E_\text{kin}m}$ and therefore ...
8
votes
4answers
692 views

Why do rainbows have distinct colors?

When I searched on the Internet for the reason of formation of rainbows, I got many explanations like this one & this. All the explanations consider only one spherical water droplet (like this ...
34
votes
4answers
2k views

Are there any theoretical limits on the energy of a photon?

Is there any lower or upper limit on the energy of a photon? i.e. does the mathematical framework we currently use for Quantum Mechanics blow up when a photon surpasses a certain upper limit of ...
-1
votes
1answer
74 views

What role does wavelength play in the identity of a photon? [duplicate]

According to this question: What determines color -- wavelength or frequency? It is the energy, and thus the frequency of a photon $E=hf$, that determines where it lies in the electromagnetic ...
1
vote
0answers
62 views

what is the effect on the fringe separation of a single slit diffraction when the wavelength is larger than the slit width? [closed]

i know that the diffraction pattern observed is stronger when the slit width is equal to the wavelength of the wave passing through, but what will happen if the slit still got narrower and became ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

FWHM of different spectra and separation in fine structure

I'm doing some research on spectroscopy and there are some phenomena I can't explain (only a second year physics student). I took some spectra of neon in the 659.89529 nm and then of hydrogen at ...