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0
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3answers
44 views

Can an atoms energy levels be changed by changing the de Broglie wavelength of electrons?

So an electron can only orbit a nucleus where its wavelength makes a standing wave, leading to discrete energy levels in atoms. But the de Broglie wavelength of an electron = h/mv. So the wavelength ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

What is the significance of wavelength when referring to light (in layman's terms)?

Without any equations or complex terminology, I simply want to understand in complete layman's terms what the significance of a single photon's wavelength is. People say that microwave radiation's ...
3
votes
1answer
65 views

Kinetic energy as $\pi k_B T$

In the derivation of the Thermal De Broglie Wavelength on Wikipedia, I come across the following: "In the nonrelativistic case the effective kinetic energy of free particles is $E_K=\pi k_B T$ ...
0
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2answers
31 views

A heavy rope is attached to one end of a lightweight rope [closed]

If one end of a heavy rope is attached to one end of a lightweight rope, a wave can move from the heavy rope into the lighter one. (a) What happens to the speed of the wave? (b) What ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

Physical meaning of wavelength of an EM wave

What is the physical meaning of the wavelength of light? This question has been asked before but I cannot find a satisfactory answer. Some respondents have said that the question is vague, I don't ...
0
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1answer
45 views

What is the wavelength of a hot metal when its temperature 400 C? [closed]

I would like to know what will be the wavelength of a hot steel which temperature is 400 degree C
1
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0answers
27 views

UV absorption decrease with an increase in concentration

I am working on a project measuring the absorbance of a solution which contains surfactant and hard brine. The solution has a constant concentration of surfactant and varying concentration of hard ...
0
votes
1answer
182 views

How does a longer wavelength penetrate deeper with Rayleigh waves?

I'm struggling slightly to understand this idea. I've slowly been building up an explanation, so at this stage it might be just some confirmation I'm looking for, but also some guidance if I'm off ...
9
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3answers
5k views

In electromagnetic radiation, how do electrons actually “move”?

I've always pictured EM radiation as a wave, in common drawings of radiation you would see it as a wave beam and that had clouded my understanding recently. Illustration on the simplest level: ...
1
vote
2answers
95 views

What is the most common photon wavelength in our observable universe (not including the Sun)?

Ignoring the Sun, what is the most common wavelength of a photon that is received by us on average? (I am not asking what is the average wavelength, but rather what is the most common wavelength ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Different colors and Metamerism

Given the following graphs: They describe the response for two different colors . In addition that both colors are metamerism. My question is why? how can I prove it? Thanks
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Variable wavelength LED

Does there exist a type of LED (or other type of light source) that can change it's wavelength depending on the current/voltage it receives on a second wire? If not, would something like this even be ...
0
votes
3answers
45 views

Why does sound wave suffer more diffraction than light waves generally?

Why do sound waves suffer more diffraction than light waves generally ? I would like more of a logical explanation rather than mathematical .
0
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3answers
44 views

Wavelength vs Wavenumber etiquette

When am I supposed to use the terminology of EM "wavenumber", instead of "wavelength" (or frequency)? The concepts of wavelength and frequency are no problem for me, but wavenumber (number of ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Wavelength-dependent refractive index

I read in a book about optical fibers that the different spectral components of a light pulse transmitted in the fiber propagate with different velocities due to a wavelength dependent refractive ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

What is a wavelength of an EM wave physically?

This might be a silly question given I am a physics undergrad, but I was suddenly confused. Usually when EM hit a gap they diffract through the gap. But if the gap is too small, diffraction can't take ...
2
votes
1answer
62 views

What is the physical significance of Compton wavelength?

Wikipedia says, The Compton wavelength represents the quantum response of mass to local geometry. What does it actually mean?
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2answers
154 views

If photons don't “experience” time, how do they account for their gradual change in wavelength?

It is often said that photons do not experience time. From what I've read, this is because that when travelling at the speed of light, space is contracted to infinity, so while there is no time to ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

$\sqrt{\frac{\omega ^2}{c^2}-k_z^2}$ in cylindrical harmonics

The radial component of the solution of the wave equation in cylindrical coordinates is $$J_\nu \bigg(\rho\sqrt{\frac{\omega ^2}{c^2}-k_z^2}\,\,\bigg).$$ But I always thought that $\frac \omega c$ ...
0
votes
2answers
86 views

Huygen's principle and why can't we see atoms with light

First of all, I'd like to discuss Huygen's principle. In order to explain waves diffraction, it says that every point in a wave front behaves as a source, so the next wave front is the sum of all ...
51
votes
3answers
3k views

How to measure the wavelength of a laser pointer?

I'm working on something and I need to know the wavelength of the laser pointer that I'm using. Can you suggest me a way, using some optics formulae, or anything else to calculate the wavelength?
1
vote
2answers
40 views

How do we know the boundaries of a wavelength?

So the length of a wave is the distance between two compressed regions as shown in this representation of a longitudinal wave: But how do you know exactly where the two points are? Is there a point ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

Uncertainty principle

I am reading about uncertainity principle. My textbook says, if $λ$ is the wavelength of the radiation used to observe the particle then the position of the particle cannot be determined with ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

How to actually determine the Index of Refraction of an object in different colors of light?

I would like some guidance as to how the IOR of an object is determined in different colored lights. Taking for example diamond, I know that the base IOR is 2.417, and the respective wavelengths of ...
0
votes
3answers
98 views

Why can microphone be much smaller than wavelength of sound?

For sound from 20Hz to 20kHz, wavelength is 17m to 17mm, for sound at 2kHz, wavelength is 17cm. And I saw tiny microphone which is much smaller than that. In electromagnetic, there is a smallest size ...
6
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6answers
12k views

Is all kind of light same speed?

Is there any speed difference between blue or red light? Is there ever a speed difference? Or does all types of light move at the same speed?
2
votes
3answers
64 views

Is sunlight truly white?

I recently purchased a book on nuclear astrophysics, with no goal of mastering the topic but merely to read in between exams and hopefully learn something, it is revealed that the sun is composed ...
1
vote
4answers
67 views

Are wavelength and the distance same thing?

Can you clarify for me the following question: are wavelength and distance same? I know wavelength is measured in terms of distance but when we have a look at the two equations: $$ c=f\,\lambda\\ ...
2
votes
1answer
26 views

How does light filtration work?

How exactly do certain types of glass filter out light within specific frequencies/wavelengths? I'm wondering because I read somewhere that certain types of windows filter out certain parts of the ...
8
votes
3answers
558 views

Why do rainbows have distinct colors?

When I searched on the Internet for the reason of formation of rainbows, I got many explanations like this one & this. All the explanations consider only one spherical water droplet (like this ...
29
votes
4answers
2k views

Are there any theoretical limits on the energy of a photon?

Is there any lower or upper limit on the energy of a photon? i.e. does the mathematical framework we currently use for Quantum Mechanics blow up when a photon surpasses a certain upper limit of ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

Physical reality of calculated wavelength from the two measurable phenomena slit distance and fringes distance?

I see some difficulties in answering this question (Have we really measured the wavelength of light?) about the measurement of the light's wavelengths with double slit interference. "... we can find ...
0
votes
1answer
107 views

Error propagation from frequency to wavelength

I have measured a value for a frequency of $1.07 \times 10^{10} \pm 5 \times 10^7) \text{ Hz}$. Obviously it is very simple to find the wavelength from this frequency value, which I have (using ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Have we really measured the wavelength of light? [duplicate]

Have we practically measured the distances between the variations of electromagnetic radiations in space in nanometers or is it just theoritical because of calculations? Also the one who have marked ...
20
votes
8answers
19k views

What determines color — wavelength or frequency?

What determines the color of light -- is it the wavelength of the light or the frequency? (i.e. If you put light through a medium other than air, in order to keep its color the same, which one would ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Dipoles lengths underwater vs on land

A submarine (for example) uses a VLF communications system to remain in contact with its headquarters while submerged. The submarine drags a resonant dipole wire antenna behind it in the water. The ...
4
votes
1answer
105 views

Why “colours” of light are given in wavelength not frequency?

If I understand correctly, when a beam of (monochromatic) light passes through media of different refractive indices, its wavelength changes but frequency remains constant. Why, then, are colours of ...
3
votes
0answers
45 views

Beating the Diffraction Limit with NSOM

I am trying to understand exactly why we can beat the diffraction limit when using near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM). For those who aren't familiar with NSOM, check out this article: ...
0
votes
1answer
122 views

Does sunlight contain 940nm wavelength light?

Apologies if this has an obvious answer, my knowledge of this area is very limited. I am attempting to produce a setup that will allow me to illuminate objects in 940nm wavelength infrared light, and ...
0
votes
1answer
185 views

What will happen if I transmit 850nm signal through a 1300nm optical fiber? [closed]

We prefer 1300nm optical fiber over 850nm optical fiber because later one is more efficient. So am selecting 1300nm optical fiber. But I want to know the possibility of using same cable to transmit ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Minimum wavelength in black body radiation

Is there a minimum wavelength in a black body's radiation? If yes, is there a formula to calculate it? In this image from Wikipedia, it does seem that the curve is touching the x-axis rather than ...
-1
votes
1answer
60 views

Confusion in understanding wave number

The wave number is the number of complete wave cycles in a meter. So, $$K = \frac{1m}{\lambda}$$ and also, $$K = \frac{2\pi}{\lambda}$$ so according to both of the above equation how is $$2\pi ...
1
vote
2answers
150 views

Does each photon have a unique wavelength?

Since the frequencies (or inversely, wavelengths) of photons are part of a continuous realm, doesn't this mean that no photon has exactly the same frequency? Two photons might have the same apparent ...
2
votes
2answers
532 views

Why do microwave ovens use radiation with such long wavelength?

According to Wikipedia: Consumer ovens usually use 2.45 gigahertz (GHz)—a wavelength of 12.2 centimetres (4.80 in). Typically, I put the dish inside the oven in its center. I suspect most ...
29
votes
4answers
4k views

Is there an infinite amount of wavelengths of light? Is the EM spectrum continuous?

The electromagnetic spectrum is a continuum of wavelengths of light, and we have labels for some ranges of these and numerical measurements for many. Question: Is the EM spectrum continuous such that ...
1
vote
2answers
99 views

What wavelengths to combine to get 488nm?

Is it possible to combine a blue and green lasers to get cyan? If I used 405nm and 532nm, would I get (405+532)/2= 468.5nm? Is this a correct calculation?
0
votes
1answer
27 views

How does the flow of photons (qty/s) vary across the spectrum? (In everyday life)

Humans see only a narrow band of light wavelengths. Many animals see much deeper into infrared. Maybe one clue to explain why we don't see IR naturally, has to do with the light intensity as a ...
11
votes
6answers
3k views

Why is air invisible?

I think that something is invisible if it's isolated particles are smaller than the wavelength of visible light. Is this correct? Why is air invisible? What about other gases and fumes which are ...
1
vote
2answers
77 views

Number of different wavelengths in the visible spectrum reaching Earth

I recognize the visible wavelengths of light extend from approximately 400 - 700 nm. But how many different wavelengths exist in that range? 300 ? 30,000 ? (400.01 - 699.99) If it's completely ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

Some questions about car radio and cellphone antennas

1-Why the antenna of the radio of cars is located outside the car and not inside? 2-If the answer to 1 is because that cars are like Faraday cages then how come my cell phone can receive signal ...