1
vote
3answers
66 views

Intuitive understanding of wavelength

Light is described as having wavelength. I can somewhat understand this in connection with for example the double slit experiment, that photons interact spatially in a wave like manner. But can the ...
0
votes
2answers
85 views

Change in Wavelength of a Photon Relation to Energy (specifically Compton Effect)

Given a photon dropping from $\lambda_1$ to $\lambda_2$, its energy will drop from $\frac{hc}{(\lambda_1)}$ to $\frac{hc}{(\lambda_2)}$. However, I was wondering if there is any significance in the ...
1
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2answers
157 views

How is wavelength actually related to space (/distance)?

Is a photon of 400nm in wavelength "smaller" than a photon of 1km in wavelegth?
4
votes
1answer
495 views

Is the de Broglie wavelength of a photon equal to the EM wavelength of the radiation?

Is the de Broglie (matter) wavelength $\lambda=\frac{h}{p}$ of a photon equal to the electromagnetic wavelength of the radiation? I guess yes, but how come that photons have both a matter wave and an ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

How does QED deal with wavelength of quanta [duplicate]

Since QED treats photons as individual units (quanta) how does it treat the concept of the "wavelength" associated with the photon?
5
votes
2answers
414 views

If photons move linearly, what's actually stopping them from passing through a microwave oven mesh?

So, my understanding is that the wavelength of a photon is the distance traveled in the time it takes it's magnetic field to oscillate. And it's inversely proportional to it's energy and it's ...
1
vote
1answer
129 views

Will a photon emitted from something moving quickly have a shorter wavelength?

If a photon is emitted from a light source moving at any speed, the photon will nonetheless always move at c (assuming it is emitted in a vacuum.) If the speed of a photon's emitter cannot influence ...