A complex scalar field that describes a quantum mechanical system. The square of the modulus of the wave function gives the probability of the system to be found in a particular state.

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What does the wavevector $\textbf{k}$ mean?

In Ashcroft, Mermin Solid State Physics, Eq. 17.43 is $$ \epsilon(\textbf{k}) = \frac{\hbar^2 k^2}{2m} - e\phi(\textbf{r}) $$ where $\textbf{k}$ is the wavevector and all other symbols have their ...
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Interpretation of de Broglie wave

Until what point can the de Broglie wave be thought as a real wave? I mean, is it made of something? What amplitude does it have? Is it a sine wave? How can it be related to the wavefunction of the ...
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375 views

Can we measure “wavefunction” of quantum particles?

We know that there is uncertainty principle, so question: can we ever measure wavefunction of particles? I do not think this is possible, but I am not sure. I guess that everything is probabilistic. ...
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Periodic boundary condition on a Wave Function of a Particle in a Box

Until now solving the Schrodinger Equation for a particle in a box was relatively easy because the boundaries conditions imposed zero value on the wave function at the boundaries. But now I must find ...
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Time evolution of Gaussian wave packet

I'm slightly confused as to answer this question, someone please help: Consider a free particle in one dimension, described by the initial wave function $$\psi(x,0) = ...
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339 views

Electron in an infinite potential well

Does this problem have any sense? Suppose an electron in an infinite well of length $0.5nm$. The state of the system is the superposition of the ground state and the first excited state. Find the ...
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601 views

Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization from the WKB approximation

How can one prove the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization formula $$ \oint p~dq ~=~2\pi n \hbar $$ from the WKB ansatz solution $$\Psi(x)~=~e^{iS(x)/ \hbar}$$ for the Schroedinger equation? With $S$ the ...
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A general wavefunction in a square lattice

Suppose we have a square lattice with periodic condition in both $x$ and $y$ direction with four atoms per unit cell, the configuration of the four atoms has $C_4$ symmetry. What will be a general ...
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110 views

Connection between a simple matter wave and Heisenberg's uncertainty relation

When looking at the wave function of a particle, I usually prefer to write $$ \Psi(x,t) = A \exp(i(kx - \omega t)) $$ since it reminds me of classical waves for which I have an intuition ($k$ ...
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Hydrogen wave function in momentum space

We can seperate the wave function of an hydrogen atom in a radial and an angle part: $$ \phi_{n,l,m} (\mathbf{r}) = R_{n,l,m}(r) Y_{l,m}(\vartheta,\varphi) \, , $$ where $Y_{l,m}$ are the spherical ...
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311 views

Time Dependent HydroHow would I go about writing the time dependent wave function given the wavefunction at $t=0$? gen Wave Function

1) How vwoulHow would I go about writing the time dependent wave function given the wavefunction at $t=0$? go about writing the time dependent wave function given the wavefunction at $t=0$? ...
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603 views

Mathematical explanation of quantum teleportation

I am now studying quantum teleportation. I get what the process is like but I'm wondering why it happens this way. You've got two entangled particles A and B whose wavefunctions are entangled. You ...
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238 views

Nodes and Antinodes for standing wave

In the arrangement shown in the figure below, an object of mass m can be hung from a string (linear mass density $\mu$ = 2.00 g/m) that passes over a light (massless) pulley. The string is connected ...
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Vector representation of wavefunction in quantum mechanics?

I am new to quantum mechanics, and I just studied some parts of "wave mechanics" version of quantum mechanics. But I heard that wavefunction can be represented as vector in Hilbert space. In my eye, ...
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934 views

Why does a plane wave have definite momentum?

Apologies if this is a little vague. It might not have a good answer. Given the interpretation of $|\psi(x)|^2$ as a probability distribution it's unsurprising that a wave function that is ...
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605 views

Potential step and its transmission / reflection

Lets say we have a potential step with regions 1 with zero potential $W_p\!=\!0$ (this is a free particle) and region 2 with potential $W_p$. Wave functions in this case are: \begin{align} ...
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201 views

How does one find the wave velocity and the phase speed?

While I was studying beats, I tried to find a displacement function of any particle in the most generalized form. I ended up with $$y=2A\sin(\pi(t-x/v)(f_1+f_2))\cos(\pi(t-x/v)(f_1-f_2)).$$ Now, ...
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322 views

Why the hydrogen radial wave function is real?

Why the hydrogen radial wave function is real? Is it a coincidence?
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134 views

Why do people say the phase oscillates in time and the amplitude stays the same but the intensity of a traveling beam does oscillate with time?

I'm confused why people say the phase oscillates in time and the amplitude stays the same (the reason for having complex numbers). But on the other hand, the intensity of a traveling beam does ...
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Why does the wave description say that probability oscillates, while the phase interpretation says constant amplitude?

The wave description of a particle illustrates an oscillating probability of the particle being found in any point in space. When a particle travels, it carries along with it a phase that oscillates ...
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183 views

normalizing a wavefunction

I have a homework problem that I can't get started on, below is the first bit. I feel like I should just be able to integrate to find $C$ but I get a divergent integral. Can someone give me a hint as ...
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34 views

Is there anything to prevent paired-up neutrons from a complete overlap

The reason "neutrons don't overlap", as DarenW explained it, has to do with intricate forces at play that take into account the spins, iso-spins and symmetry of the wavefunctions. However, assume I ...
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Why is the Horizontal Force Constant in Deriving the One Dimensional Wave Equation

My textbook in deriving the wave equation for a one dimensional elastic string stated that the horizontal direction force is constant.I understand that the horizontal components of the tensions on ...
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783 views

Finite, square, potential well

Lets say we have a finite square well symetric around $y$ axis (picture below). I know how and why general solutions to the second order ODE (stationary Schrödinger equation) are as follows for ...
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272 views

Is normalization consistent with Schrodinger's Equation?

Schrodinger's Equation does not set a limit on the size of wave functions but to normalize a wave function a limit must be set. How is this consistent physically and mathematically with Schrodinger's ...
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221 views

Phase shift in electromagnetic potential

In Aharonov-Bohm effect, how to derive that the wave function of a electric charge $q$ acquires a phase shift $\phi=\frac{q}{\hbar}\int \mathbf{A} \cdot d\mathbf{x}$ after travelling in the non-zero ...
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127 views

Question about the linearity of wave functions

For piece-wise constant potential, the potential energy is constant so the time dependent wave function can take the form $\psi(x,t)=C_1e^{i(kx- \omega t)}+C_2e^{i(-kx-\omega t)}$ where ...
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146 views

Where is a particle bound in a delta potential?

I can picture a bound state in a harmonic oscillator, or in an infinite square well, but where is a particle bound in a delta potential?
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630 views

Wavefunction restrictions of odd potentials

So I was just reading back through Griffiths' "Introduction to Quantum Mechanics" and solving some of the problems for practice. There is a nice one (problem 2.1c for those playing at home) where you ...
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245 views

What does it mean for something to be a ket?

Ok so I will provide the following example, which I am choosing at random from Sabio et al(2010): $$\psi(r,\phi)~=~\left[ \begin{array}{c} A_1r\sin(\theta-\phi)\\ ...
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Wave function and Dirac bra-ket notation

Would anyone be able to explain the difference, technically, between wave function notation for quantum systems e.g. $\psi=\psi(x)$ and Dirac bra-ket vector notation? How do you get from one to the ...
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421 views

Cylindrical wave

I know that a wave dependent of the radius (cylindrical symmetry), has a good a approximations as $$u(r,t)=\frac{a}{\sqrt{r}}[f(x-vt)+f(x+vt)]$$ when $r$ is big. I would like to know how to deduce ...
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463 views

What does the wavefunction of atom look like at low temperature?

I am reading an introduction material on Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at low temperature and it stated that when the temperature approaches zero kelvin, almost all atoms are degenerated into the ...
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Gaussian wave packet

At our QM intro our professor said that we derive uncertainty principle using the integral of plane waves $\psi = \psi_0(k) e^{i(kx - \omega t)}$ over wave numbers $k$. We do it at $t=0$ hence $\psi = ...
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228 views

Once I have the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors, how do I find the eigenfunctions?

I am using Mathematica to construct a matrix for the Hamiltonian of some system. I have built this matrix already, and I have found the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors, I am uncertain if what I did ...
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430 views

In Dirac notation, what do the subscripts represent? (Solution for particle in a box in mind)

So the set of solutions for the particle in a box is given by $$\psi_n(x) = \sqrt{\frac{2}{L}}\sin(\frac{n\pi x}{L}).$$ In Dirac notation $<\psi_i|\psi_j>=\delta_{ij}$ assuming $|\psi_i>$ ...
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In the expansion of the scattered wave function, why do these two functions have the same index?

See Griffiths Quantum Mechanics, eq. 11.21. Evidently, $$\psi(r,\theta,\phi)=Ae^{ikz}+A\sum\limits_{l,m}^{\infty}C_{l,m}h_{l}(kr)Y_{l}^{m}(\theta,\phi).$$ But I don't see why the $l$th Hankel function ...
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Could quantum mechanics work without the Born rule?

Slightly inspired by this question about the historical origins of the Born rule, I wondered whether quantum mechanics could still work without the Born rule. I realize it's one of the most ...
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896 views

Normalisation factor $\psi_0$ for wave function $\psi = \psi_0 \sin(kx-\omega t)$

I know that if I integrate probabilitlity $|\psi|^2$ over a whole volume $V$ I am supposed to get 1. This equation describes this. $$\int \limits^{}_{V} \left|\psi \right|^2 \, \textrm{d} V = 1\\$$ ...
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144 views

Young experiment: square of classical real wave function

I can't understand why the sum of two real waves result in a time dependent wave, but not so for the complex waves. In details, I can't get this passage on p.38-39 in A.C. Phillips, Introduction to ...
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Confused over complex representation of the wave

My quantum mechanics textbook says that the following is a representation of a wave traveling in the +$x$ direction:$$\Psi(x,t)=Ae^{i\left(kx-\omega t\right)}\tag1$$ I'm having trouble visualizing ...
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Amplitude of Probability amplitude. Which one is it?

QM begins with a Born's rule which states that probability $P$ is equal to a modulus square of probability amplitude $\psi$: $$P = \left|\psi\right|^2.$$ If I write down a wave function like this ...
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Probability and probability amplitude [duplicate]

What made scientists believe that we should calculate probability $P$ as the $P = \left|\psi\right|^2$ in quantum mechanics? Was it the double slit experiment? How? Is there anywhere in the ...
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Solving the time independent Schrodinger equation: Does a complex solution make sense?

In my notes, I have the Time Independent Schrodinger equation for a free particle $$\frac{\partial^2 \psi}{\partial x^2}+\frac{p^2}{\hbar^2}\psi=0\tag1$$ The solution to this is given, in my notes, ...
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Superconducting Wavefunction Phase (Feynman Lectures)

In Volume 3, Section 21-5 of the Feynman lectures (superconductivity), Feynman makes a step that I can't quite follow. To start, he writes the wavefunction of the ground state in the following form ...
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538 views

Expectation values-Wavefunction

I'm a bit puzzled about an excercise in which I have to find the expectation values for position and momentum. Normally this should be pretty easy but in this case I just don't get the point. ...
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Meaning of $\int \phi^\dagger \hat A \psi \:\mathrm dx$

While analysing a problem in quantum Mechanics, I realized that I don't fully understand the physical meanings of certain integrals. I have been interpreting: $\int \phi^\dagger \hat A \psi ...
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Is this interpretation of $\psi=\frac{1}{\sqrt{\pi a^{3}}}e^{-r/a}$ correct?

Apologies if this is stating the obvious, but I'm a non-physicist trying to understand Griffiths' discussion of the hydrogen atom in chapter 4 of Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. The wave equation ...
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What does the quantum state of a system tell us about itself?

In quantum mechanics, quantum state refers to the state of a quantum system. A quantum state is given as a vector in a vector space, called the state vector. The state vector theoretically ...
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Does quantum mechanics allow faster than light (FTL) travel?

Let's suppose I initially have a particle with a nice and narrow wave function[1] (I will leave these unnormed): $$e^{-\frac{x^2}{a}}$$ where $a$ is some small number (to make it narrow). Let's also ...