A complex scalar field that describes a quantum mechanical system. The square of the modulus of the wave function gives the probability of the system to be found in a particular state.

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Time evolution of Gaussian wave packet

I'm slightly confused as to answer this question, someone please help: Consider a free particle in one dimension, described by the initial wave function $$\psi(x,0) = ...
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249 views

Electron in an infinite potential well

Does this problem have any sense? Suppose an electron in an infinite well of length $0.5nm$. The state of the system is the superposition of the ground state and the first excited state. Find the ...
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103 views

A general wavefunction in a square lattice

Suppose we have a square lattice with periodic condition in both $x$ and $y$ direction with four atoms per unit cell, the configuration of the four atoms has $C_4$ symmetry. What will be a general ...
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476 views

Ground state energies with fermions of same spin?

Consider two non-interacting Fermions (half-integer spin) confined in a 'box'. Construct the anti-symmetric wavefunctions and compare the corresponding ground-state energies of the two systems; ...
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103 views

Connection between a simple matter wave and Heisenberg's uncertainty relation

When looking at the wave function of a particle, I usually prefer to write $$ \Psi(x,t) = A \exp(i(kx - \omega t)) $$ since it reminds me of classical waves for which I have an intuition ($k$ ...
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376 views

Mathematical explanation of quantum teleportation

I am now studying quantum teleportation. I get what the process is like but I'm wondering why it happens this way. You've got two entangled particles A and B whose wavefunctions are entangled. You ...
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729 views

Hydrogen wave function in momentum space

We can seperate the wave function of an hydrogen atom in a radial and an angle part: $$ \phi_{n,l,m} (\mathbf{r}) = R_{n,l,m}(r) Y_{l,m}(\vartheta,\varphi) \, , $$ where $Y_{l,m}$ are the spherical ...
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224 views

Time Dependent HydroHow would I go about writing the time dependent wave function given the wavefunction at $t=0$? gen Wave Function

1) How vwoulHow would I go about writing the time dependent wave function given the wavefunction at $t=0$? go about writing the time dependent wave function given the wavefunction at $t=0$? ...
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176 views

Nodes and Antinodes for standing wave

In the arrangement shown in the figure below, an object of mass m can be hung from a string (linear mass density $\mu$ = 2.00 g/m) that passes over a light (massless) pulley. The string is connected ...
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639 views

Plotting Hydrogen's $2P_{x,y,z}$ Probability Densities in MATLAB [closed]

I have spent an unreasonable amount of time trying to plot $F(r,\theta,\phi)$ plane slices in MATLAB. I want to look at $x-y,y-z,x-z$ planes. Here's the function, specifically: ...
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How to calculate ground state wave function?

I have seen many ground state wave functions. From where are they derived? How can one calculate them? Where can one find a list of all ground state wavefunctions discovered?
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386 views

Potential step and its transmission / reflection

Lets say we have a potential step with regions 1 with zero potential $W_p\!=\!0$ (this is a free particle) and region 2 with potential $W_p$. Wave functions in this case are: \begin{align} ...
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866 views

Vector representation of wavefunction in quantum mechanics?

I am new to quantum mechanics, and I just studied some parts of "wave mechanics" version of quantum mechanics. But I heard that wavefunction can be represented as vector in Hilbert space. In my eye, ...
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274 views

Why the hydrogen radial wave function is real?

Why the hydrogen radial wave function is real? Is it a coincidence?
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195 views

How does one find the wave velocity and the phase speed?

While I was studying beats, I tried to find a displacement function of any particle in the most generalized form. I ended up with $$y=2A\sin(\pi(t-x/v)(f_1+f_2))\cos(\pi(t-x/v)(f_1-f_2)).$$ Now, ...
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621 views

Why does a plane wave have definite momentum?

Apologies if this is a little vague. It might not have a good answer. Given the interpretation of $|\psi(x)|^2$ as a probability distribution it's unsurprising that a wave function that is ...
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157 views

Why does the wave description say that probability oscillates, while the phase interpretation says constant amplitude?

The wave description of a particle illustrates an oscillating probability of the particle being found in any point in space. When a particle travels, it carries along with it a phase that oscillates ...
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Absolute value sign when normalizing a wave function

I have solved the following problem from Griffiths "Introduction to Quantum Mechanics". Consider the wavefunction: $\Psi (x,t) = A e^{-\lambda |x|} e^{-i\omega t} $ Normalize $\Psi$. Now, we ...
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165 views

normalizing a wavefunction

I have a homework problem that I can't get started on, below is the first bit. I feel like I should just be able to integrate to find $C$ but I get a divergent integral. Can someone give me a hint as ...
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655 views

Finite, square, potential well

Lets say we have a finite square well symetric around $y$ axis (picture below). I know how and why general solutions to the second order ODE (stationary Schrödinger equation) are as follows for ...
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33 views

Is there anything to prevent paired-up neutrons from a complete overlap

The reason "neutrons don't overlap", as DarenW explained it, has to do with intricate forces at play that take into account the spins, iso-spins and symmetry of the wavefunctions. However, assume I ...
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1answer
78 views

Why is the Horizontal Force Constant in Deriving the One Dimensional Wave Equation

My textbook in deriving the wave equation for a one dimensional elastic string stated that the horizontal direction force is constant.I understand that the horizontal components of the tensions on ...
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94 views

Question about the linearity of wave functions

For piece-wise constant potential, the potential energy is constant so the time dependent wave function can take the form $\psi(x,t)=C_1e^{i(kx- \omega t)}+C_2e^{i(-kx-\omega t)}$ where ...
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135 views

Where is a particle bound in a delta potential?

I can picture a bound state in a harmonic oscillator, or in an infinite square well, but where is a particle bound in a delta potential?
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139 views

Young experiment: square of classical real wave function

I can't understand why the sum of two real waves result in a time dependent wave, but not so for the complex waves. In details, I can't get this passage on p.38-39 in A.C. Phillips, Introduction to ...
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Solving the time independent Schrodinger equation: Does a complex solution make sense?

In my notes, I have the Time Independent Schrodinger equation for a free particle $$\frac{\partial^2 \psi}{\partial x^2}+\frac{p^2}{\hbar^2}\psi=0\tag1$$ The solution to this is given, in my notes, ...
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440 views

Wavefunction restrictions of odd potentials

So I was just reading back through Griffiths' "Introduction to Quantum Mechanics" and solving some of the problems for practice. There is a nice one (problem 2.1c for those playing at home) where you ...
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1answer
230 views

What does it mean for something to be a ket?

Ok so I will provide the following example, which I am choosing at random from Sabio et al(2010): $$\psi(r,\phi)~=~\left[ \begin{array}{c} A_1r\sin(\theta-\phi)\\ ...
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What is the relation between position and momentum wavefunctions in quantum physics?

I have read in a couple of places that $\psi(p)$ and $\psi(q)$ are Fourier transforms of one another (e.g. Penrose). But isn't a Fourier transform simply a decomposition of a function into a sum or ...
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1answer
947 views

Wave function and Dirac bra-ket notation

Would anyone be able to explain the difference, technically, between wave function notation for quantum systems e.g. $\psi=\psi(x)$ and Dirac bra-ket vector notation? How do you get from one to the ...
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326 views

Cylindrical wave

I know that a wave dependent of the radius (cylindrical symmetry), has a good a approximations as $$u(r,t)=\frac{a}{\sqrt{r}}[f(x-vt)+f(x+vt)]$$ when $r$ is big. I would like to know how to deduce ...
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196 views

Once I have the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors, how do I find the eigenfunctions?

I am using Mathematica to construct a matrix for the Hamiltonian of some system. I have built this matrix already, and I have found the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors, I am uncertain if what I did ...
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350 views

In Dirac notation, what do the subscripts represent? (Solution for particle in a box in mind)

So the set of solutions for the particle in a box is given by $$\psi_n(x) = \sqrt{\frac{2}{L}}\sin(\frac{n\pi x}{L}).$$ In Dirac notation $<\psi_i|\psi_j>=\delta_{ij}$ assuming $|\psi_i>$ ...
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Normalisation factor $\psi_0$ for wave function $\psi = \psi_0 \sin(kx-\omega t)$

I know that if I integrate probabilitlity $|\psi|^2$ over a whole volume $V$ I am supposed to get 1. This equation describes this. $$\int \limits^{}_{V} \left|\psi \right|^2 \, \textrm{d} V = 1\\$$ ...
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Amplitude of Probability amplitude. Which one is it?

QM begins with a Born's rule which states that probability $P$ is equal to a modulus square of probability amplitude $\psi$: $$P = \left|\psi\right|^2.$$ If I write down a wave function like this ...
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1answer
86 views

In the expansion of the scattered wave function, why do these two functions have the same index?

See Griffiths Quantum Mechanics, eq. 11.21. Evidently, $$\psi(r,\theta,\phi)=Ae^{ikz}+A\sum\limits_{l,m}^{\infty}C_{l,m}h_{l}(kr)Y_{l}^{m}(\theta,\phi).$$ But I don't see why the $l$th Hankel function ...
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Why do we consider the evolution (usually in time) of a wave function?

Why do we consider evolution of a wave function and why is the evolution parameter taken as time, in QM. If we look at a simple wave function $\psi(x,t) = e^{kx - \omega t}$, $x$ is a point in ...
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Probability and probability amplitude [duplicate]

What made scientists believe that we should calculate probability $P$ as the $P = \left|\psi\right|^2$ in quantum mechanics? Was it the double slit experiment? How? Is there anywhere in the ...
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439 views

Expectation values-Wavefunction

I'm a bit puzzled about an excercise in which I have to find the expectation values for position and momentum. Normally this should be pretty easy but in this case I just don't get the point. ...
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Tip of a spreading wave-packet: asymptotics beyond all orders of a saddle point expansion

This is a technical question coming from mapping of an unrelated problem onto dynamics of a non-relativistic massive particle in 1+1 dimensions. This issue is with asymptotics dominated by a term ...
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3answers
589 views

Meaning of $\int \phi^\dagger \hat A \psi \:\mathrm dx$

While analysing a problem in quantum Mechanics, I realized that I don't fully understand the physical meanings of certain integrals. I have been interpreting: $\int \phi^\dagger \hat A \psi ...
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3answers
378 views

Is this interpretation of $\psi=\frac{1}{\sqrt{\pi a^{3}}}e^{-r/a}$ correct?

Apologies if this is stating the obvious, but I'm a non-physicist trying to understand Griffiths' discussion of the hydrogen atom in chapter 4 of Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. The wave equation ...
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2answers
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What does the quantum state of a system tell us about itself?

In quantum mechanics, quantum state refers to the state of a quantum system. A quantum state is given as a vector in a vector space, called the state vector. The state vector theoretically ...
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569 views

Non-Degeneracy of Eigenvalues of Number Operator for Simple Harmonic Oscillator [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Proof that the One-Dimensional Simple Harmonic Oscillator is Non-Degenerate? I'm trying to convince myself that the eigenvalues $n$ of the number operator ...
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Was uncertainty principle inferred by Fourier analysis?

I would like to know: did Heisenberg chance upon his Uncertainty Principle by performing Fourier analysis of wavepackets, after assuming that electrons can be treated as wavepackets?
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What's the physical significance of the inner product of two wave functions in quantum region?

I am a reading a book for beginners of the quantum mechanics. In one section, the author shows the inner product of two wave functions $\langle\alpha\vert\beta\rangle$. I am wondering what's the ...
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Interpretation of $e|\psi|^2$ as electron density

In solid state physics the electron density is often equated to $e|\psi|^2$. However, the Sakurai says (Chapter 2.4, Interpretation of the Wave Function, p. 101) that adopting such a view leads "to ...
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Speed of a particle in quantum mechanics: phase velocity vs. group velocity

Given that one usually defines two different velocities for a wave, these being the phase velocity and the group velocity, I was asking their meaning for the associated particle in quantum mechanics. ...
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How is wavefunction probability redistributed after partial wavefunction collapse?

Suppose I set up the double-slit experiment using photons as my particle. Behind the left slit I place a beam splitter that points some of the light off in the direction of a camera (represented as ...
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Wavefunction collapse and gravity

If gravity can be thought of as both a wave (the gravitational wave, as predicted to exist by Albert Einstein and certain calculations) and a particle (the graviton), would it make sense to apply ...