A complex scalar field that describes a quantum mechanical system. The square of the modulus of the wave function gives the probability of the system to be found in a particular state.

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80 views

Uncertainity principle and double slit experiment?

My Understanding of uncertainty principle goes that if some particles are in same state, then their measurement of certain property (say $x$ and $p$) will be different for different particles. ...
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1answer
90 views

Normalizing a wave function [closed]

A particle with mass $m$ is moving in one dimension. The wave function of the particle is $$\Psi(x,t)=Axe^{-(\sqrt{km}/2\hbar)x^2}e^{-i\sqrt{k/m}(3/2)t}$$ for $-\infty<x<\infty$, ...
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1answer
112 views

QM and relative phases

I recently started formally learning about QM. I have studied thus far that any global phase difference is irrelevant when taking energy expectation values. However, that is not evidently the case for ...
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2answers
130 views

Where are the worlds in many-worlds interpretation?

What does it mean in MWI for other universes to exist? Are they in some sector of spacetime beyond our cosmic horizon or is it more complicated? I'm not asking this on Philosophy SE because people ...
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1answer
122 views

Normalization of potential barrier solution

I don't understand a point in the solution attached to this barrier potential problem. Below equation 4.209, they say Assume first that the wave function on the right side of the barrier in the ...
4
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1answer
46 views

Probability in Measuring Noncommuting Observables

If I have a particle in a state $\Psi(x) = e^{-x^2}$ could I calculate probability of simultaneously measuring, say, $x > 0, p_x < 0$? I understand that $p_x$ and $x$ don't commute and ...
2
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1answer
52 views

Derive probability current density - factors of 2 discrepancy [closed]

To derive the probability current density for a particle in an electromagnetic field, we calculate $\dfrac{\partial \rho}{\partial t} = \dfrac{\partial}{\partial t} (\Psi^* \Psi) = \dfrac{\partial ...
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1answer
135 views

Wavefunction interpretations in QM

From two-slit electron-interference experiment we can infer that there is a wave $\psi(x,t)$ that can be associated with electron. The amplitude at some point is the sum of amplitudes reaching that ...
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1answer
273 views

What is the wavefunction of the Young Double Slit experiment?

I have never seen the wavefunction for this experiment and would like to know how to derive it using the Schrodinger equation. I specifically want to see how the electron wave function leaves the ...
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0answers
66 views

Wave function: what does “1% chance of finding the particle in this area” mean

Say I have 1 electron in some quantum state Defined by some wave function, and it's doing its thing fluctuating the probabilities of where it might be. What if I put a measuring device in an area ...
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2answers
193 views

Why are electron wavefunctions standing waves?

How can I convince myself that wavefunctions of electrons on molecular orbitals are indeed standing waves? Is it a consequence of the fact that electrons don't drift away from the molecule? In other ...
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0answers
24 views

Dirac equation in the presence of a defect

The 1D Dirac equation in the presence of a defect is described by a position dependent mass term known as a "kink" or "soliton". It is sign changing and tends to a constant at positive and negative ...
4
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1answer
104 views

In interpretations of QM where the wave function is real, what does that mean?

In a lot of interpretations of Quantum Mechanics they believe that the wave function is "real". But what does that mean? Are they saying that the wave function of an elementary particle ...
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3answers
446 views

Physical meaning of quantum operators

Let's say we have a wavefunction $\psi$ and a measurement operator $\hat A$. I understand how eigenvalues and eigenvectors of $\hat A$ describe the possible outcomes of the measurement. I also ...
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0answers
75 views

How do you determine the symmetry of spatial wave functions?

I have been reading about the ways to determine the ground of state of an atom. There are three Hund's rules in determining which electronic state is a ground state. And the second rule says you need ...
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2answers
130 views

Rectangular potential barrier

Take the usual rectangular potential barrier, that is: $$V(x)=0 \: \text{if} \: x<0 \: \text{or}\: \: x>a$$ $$V(x)=V_0 \: \text{if} \: 0\leq x \leq a.$$ I've looked at several notes and books ...
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1answer
132 views

How can the wave function contain all information of a system?

During my quantum mechanics lectures and in literature I sometimes hear that "the wave function, $\Psi$, contains all information of the system". This has made me feel rather puzzled so I hope you ...
3
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2answers
214 views

Wavefunctions in different Hilbert spaces

The state of a quantum system is represented by a wavefunction usually in some specific Hilbert space, .e.g of position, spin, momentum etc. But before deciding in which of these bases to decompose ...
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2answers
450 views

State of a system in Quantum Mechanics and state vectors

I'm taking a course in Quantum Mechanics and there is something I'm not being able to fully understand. On more elementary courses on Quantum Mechanics I've been told that the idea of Quantum ...
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1answer
34 views

Need help on understanding mechanical wave function [closed]

My textbook states that, equation 1 : y(x=0,t) = Acos($\omega$t) = Acos(2$\pi$ft), which I understand. However the book goes deeper stating also that, t-$\frac{x}{v}$, and $\frac{x}{v}$-t I am ...
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1answer
42 views

Fourier expansion and transform - what about the phase of the waves that i am adding?

Say we have a wave on the surface of the water and we want to describe it as a sum of other waves. So we use Fourier expansion to add waves of different wavelengths. For simplicity, say we have to ...
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0answers
47 views

Definition of linear response kernel in terms of wavefunctions (Parr/Yang)

I'm trying to understand the derivation of the linear response kernel in Parr/Yang's "Density-functional theory of atoms and molecules". First some background information: We look at a system of $N$ ...
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2answers
71 views

Using slope=0 technique to find most likely spherical shell

In this PDF http://riedo.gatech.edu/Teaching/Modern_Physics/hw/HW3_2010_MP_SOL.pdf problem#1, the instructor solves the question of which spherical shell (what radius $r$) has the greatest ...
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1answer
56 views

Barycenter and relative coordinates for schroedinger equation of the hydrogen atom

Heyho, i just realized i am not sure how one gets from: $\Big(-\frac{\hbar^2}{2m_e} \Delta_{r_e} - \frac{\hbar^2}{2M_P} \Delta_{r_p} +V(r) \Big)\Psi(r_e,r_p) = E \Psi(r_e,r_p)$ to: ...
4
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2answers
536 views

Schroedinger equation for hydrogen atom

I have got a problem understanding the meaning of the Laplace operator in the Schrödinger equation for the hydrogen atom. $$\Big(-\frac{\hbar^2}{2m_e} \Delta_{r_e} - \frac{\hbar^2}{2M_P} \Delta_{r_p} ...
12
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3answers
435 views

Bound states of the $V(x)=\pm \delta'^{(n)}(x)$ potential?

The $\delta(x)$ Dirac delta is not the only "point-supported" potential that we can integrate; in principle all their derivatives $\delta', \delta'', ...$ exist also, do they? If yes, can we look for ...
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4answers
273 views

Physical intuition behind negative values for wave function?

So a positive and a positive wave function create a bonding orbital where the probability of finding an electron is summed while a positive and a negative create an anti-bonding orbital with a lower ...
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1answer
119 views

Is the photon's wave function the same as an electromagnetic wave(light)? [duplicate]

The first that i have been taught in Quantum Mechanics is the photoelectric phenomenon. Without analyzing it, it concludes that when we shine light at the circuit(roughly speaking), the work required ...
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2answers
86 views

Do quantum wave functions curve spacetime before they are measured

Do wave functions cause spacetime curvature before they are measured, or would curvature only happen upon measurement? I guess the question becomes, do quantum wavefunctions carry energy while they ...
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1answer
129 views

Probability and double slit

if a beam of identical particles at random distances from each other (or exactly 1/2 lambda between each other) travelling with the same v towards a double sllit do not interfere with each others wave ...
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2answers
240 views

Why is $ \psi = A \cos(kx) $ not an acceptable wave function for a particle in a box?

Why is $ \psi = A \cos(kx) $ not an acceptable wave function for a particle in a box with rigid walls at $x=0$ and $x=L$ where $$ k = \frac {(2mE)^{1/2}} {\hbar} \, ?$$ I had plugged the wave ...
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1answer
113 views

Width of a 1 dimensional box with same ground state energy as hydrogen atom [closed]

I am trying to find the width $L$ of a one-dimensional box for which the ground state energy of an electron in the box equals the absolute value of the ground state of a hydrogen atom. No ...
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2answers
86 views

How can a solution of the time-independent Schrödinger equation evolve in space?

I understand that if the Hamiltonian does not depend on the time, the Schrödinger Equation becomes separable, so you get $$ H \psi(x) = E \psi(x) $$ and $$ \Psi(x,t) = ...
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1answer
48 views

Potential energy function for high energy continuum?

For the hydrogen atom the quantised energy levels are: $$E_n = \frac{- 13.6 eV}{n^2}\quad\text{with}\quad n = 1,2,3...$$ One peculiar property of this quantisation is that for large $n$ the energy ...
5
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3answers
360 views

Confusion about 1-forms as introduced in “Gravitation” (Kip S. Thorne,…)

In the book Gravitation in chapter 2, paragraph 5, they introduce the concept of 1-forms by thinking about the momentum 4-vector differently. They first introduce the de Broglie 1-form as follows (I ...
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2answers
157 views

How to predict bound states in a 1 D triangular well?

Assume we have a (single) particle in a potential well of the following shape: For $x \leq 0$, $V = \infty$ (Region I) For $x \geq L$, $V = 0$ (Region III) For the interval $x > 0$ to $x < ...
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1answer
126 views

Schrodinger's equation with negative sign

In time dependent Schrodinger's equation as given in Schrodinger's lecture (Four Lectures on Wave mechanics, Blackie & Son, 1949, pg22) he arrives at $$\nabla^2\psi-\frac{4 \pi m ...
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2answers
323 views

What do “ℜe” and “A*” mean?

What do "$\mathfrak{Re}$" and "A*" mean in the following equation (taken from James Binney and David Skinner's QM lecture notes, equation 1.12), \begin{align} p(S\text{ or ...
2
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1answer
52 views

Why do the two amplitudes need to match together through the region between the boxes?

This is an excerpt from Feynman's lectures 3; Suppose we think of the situation in Fig. 7–3, which has two boxes held at the constant potentials $ϕ_1$ and $ϕ_2$ and a region in between where ...
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2answers
109 views

Why can the probability function for a particle in an infinite square well be larger than 1?

For a particle in a one dimensional infinite potential well of width $L$ the probability function is: $$P_n(x)=\left(\frac{2}{L}\right)\sin^2\left(\frac{n\pi x}{L}\right)$$ for $0\leq x\leq L$. The ...
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3answers
639 views

Electron as a standing wave and its stability

1. When it was an era of classical mechanics we used to believe in the Bohr's atomic model. It interpreted electrons as particles (although I couldn't understand how come Bohr who interpreted ...
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3answers
174 views

Wave Function concept

What do we mean when we say wave function of electron? Does it mean wave nature of electrons? I am really confused.Without clearing this confusion i cannot proceed to molecular orbital theory.I am ...
0
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1answer
160 views

Semi-infinite / Asymmetric potential well

I'm asked to come up with an ansatz and solve for the coefficients of a asymmetric infinite potential well, where: $$ V = \begin{cases} \infty \text{ for } x< 0 \\ V_0 \text{ for } 0 \leq x \leq L ...
1
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2answers
84 views

Where does the factor of $x$ come from in this formula for expectation value?

Given the normalised ground-state wave-function: $$\Psi(x, t)=\begin{cases} \sqrt\frac{2}{d}\cos(\frac{\pi x}{d})e^\frac{-i\hbar\pi^2t}{2md^2} & \ \lvert x\rvert<\frac{d}{2}, \\ 0 & ...
4
votes
4answers
176 views

Isn't the 'slit' in a double-slit experiment also a wave?

I'm new to QM so excuse my naivety. I was watching an online MIT QM course that described the double-slit experiment (with electrons) when it occurred to me that I have a question. In the video, the ...
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0answers
24 views

Cancelling waves and preservation of energy

In quantum physics, a particle is "defined" by a wavefunction. If you would take 2 particles with the same wavefunction, and negate one of them. They would cancel each other other out. Take for ...
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0answers
28 views

Solutions to time-independent Schrödinger's equation with symmetrical (even) potential [duplicate]

A problem from Griffith's Introduction to Quantum Mechanics asks to prove the following: Given a symmetric potential $V(x)$ $(=V(-x))$, the solutions to the time-independent Schrödinger's equation ...
1
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1answer
420 views

What does a light wave look like (3d model)

What does a light wave look like? The only models I can seem to find online are 2D waves, they just look like sin() graphs. I have seen the models of the two components of "light waves" (electric ...
19
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2answers
667 views

What is the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum field theory?

I am most interested in interpretational differences due to the fact that quantum field theory is relativistic while quantum mechanics is not. By "Copenhagen interpretation" I mean a minimal ...
6
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2answers
179 views

What state the wave function collapses into after an inaccurate measurement?

I'm watching MIT online lectures Quantum Physics I (roughly from one hour mark in the video). The lecturer explains wave functions that describe "Stationary States" that consist of a single energy ...