A complex scalar field that describes a quantum mechanical system. The square of the modulus of the wave function gives the probability of the system to be found in a particular state.

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Physical position eigenfunction normalisation

We know that the Dirac function $$\delta(a)=\lim_{a \rightarrow 0} \delta_{a}(x)$$ can be written as an infinitesimally narrow Gaussian: $$ \delta_{a}(x) := \frac{1}{\sqrt{2\pi a^2}}e^{-x^2/2a^2}$$ ...
1
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0answers
52 views

How can we justify identifying the Dirac delta function with the eigenfunction of position? [duplicate]

I can think of at least two different ways to understand eigenfunctions of operators in quantum mechanics. But neither one seems to provide a good explanation for why we take the position-basis ...
1
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1answer
61 views

Solution for Schrödinger equation for constant box potential?

It is known that in a box potential, when we set $V = 0$ inside and $V = \infty$ on the boundaries, the solution to the equation $$ - \frac{\hbar}{2m} \bigg( \frac{\partial^2}{\partial x^2} + \frac{ \...
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2answers
77 views

What do operations on single Qubits of Unfactorable Superpositions Do?

So suppose I have the following Quantum Circuit: A ---- |Control| -----|Hadamard|---- B ---- |xxxxxxx|------------------------ Which is a 2 input Controlled Gate (applying some gate of two choices ...
0
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1answer
66 views

Does the Hamiltonian time-evolution operator actually change the state of the system?

According to my understanding of things, the time evolution operator in QM looks something like this, $$U = \exp(-iHt/\hbar)$$ Which acts on the state vector / wave-function of the system to ...
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2answers
84 views

Where does the position operator come from?

In quantum mechanics the momentum and energy operators appear in Schroedinger's equation. In fact in the derivation of Schroedinger's equation from the classical wave equation the momentum operator ...
1
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1answer
54 views

Finding the velocity of a given wavepacket [closed]

I've been given a wave packet, that is moving from right to left toward a (known) potential, which has in time $t = 0$ has the form: $$ψ(x, t = 0) = Ae^{−c(x−x_0)^2}e^{ik_0x}$$ and I need to ...
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2answers
226 views

Can we write the wave function of the living things? If yes then how? [closed]

In quantum mechanics we studied that everything has a wave function associated with it.My question is can we write down the wave functions of things. Then how we can write down the wave functions of ...
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1answer
46 views

How can an atom be in an ensemble of energy states?

So I was reading this pdf and in sections 3.2.3 it states theres is an atom with |$\psi_{o}\rangle$ which is a linear combination of two energy eigenstates (a ground |0$\rangle$ and excited state |1$\...
3
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3answers
455 views

Normalization of wave function meaning…?

I just have one question. I'm doing a problem where I'm told to normalize a wave function, which is split up into two regions, namely where $r \leq r_0$ and $r > r_0$. My question is, why am I ...
4
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0answers
137 views

Schrödinger's interpretation of his wave function before Born

The below shows some excerpt from Feynman's lecture notes. 21–4 The meaning of the wave function When Schrödinger first discovered his equation he discovered the conservation law of Eq. (21....
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3answers
218 views

Can Schrödinger Equation be derived from Huygens' Principle?

Notes of Enrico Fermi start from an analogy between mechanics and optics and with 4 pages he derives the Schrödinger equation. In all my courses, I have seen as an axiom - this is how wave-particles ...
1
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1answer
70 views

Can particle quantum spin be described with a wave function? [closed]

I'm a little confused about the idea of spin. It's been non-technically described to me as "like magnetic dipole moment", except only two possible "directions". But I feel like that's a bad analogy, ...
0
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0answers
20 views

Can someone explain what the wave function is? [duplicate]

I've been doing she research I don't really understand what a wave function is. I used to think it was the de Broglie's wavelength but I've soon found otherwise. Just a simple and clear explanation ...
2
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0answers
45 views

Wavefunctions “adapted” to the perturbation ? Relation to Faraday effect

I came accross the following statement in a book: If one wants to switch on a magnetic field, one must first choose the appropriate complex unperturbed wave functions (that are "adapted" to the ...
0
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0answers
67 views

Wavefunction of electron in 3D infinite well with non-zero potential

Consider an electron moving in a potential $V$ defined by $$V(x,y,z) = \left \{ \begin{array}{ll} \alpha(x^2 + y^2) & 0 \leq z \leq a \\ \infty & \text{otherwise} \end{array} \right. $$ ...
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2answers
844 views

Degeneracy in one dimension

I'm reading this wikipedia article and I'm trying to understand the proof under "Degeneracy in One Dimension". Here's what it says: Considering a one-dimensional quantum system in a potential $V(...
10
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2answers
640 views

Non-separable solutions of the Schroedinger equation

I'm studying an undergraduate Quantum Mechanics course and I have some doubts about the solution of the Schroedinger equation by the separation of variables method. If we suppose that the solutions ...
4
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1answer
75 views

Schrödinger-Pauli Equation Solutions

The Schrödinger-Pauli equation is the non-relativistic limit of the Dirac equation, and therefore describes spin-1/2 particles in an external electromagnetic field. It is given by: $$\left[\frac{1}{...
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1answer
71 views

Is there one wavefunction per field? [closed]

Is the big picture of quantum field theory that: There are fields (EM, electron, Higgs, gravity, etc.) A field can be described by a wavefunction indicating the probability density of 1 or more '...
6
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1answer
43 views

Mathematical definition of wavefront in case of non harmonic waves

What is the general mathematical definition of wavefront? Wavefront is the surface where, at fixed time, the phase is constant But for non-harmonic waves we cannot talk about phase as the ...
4
votes
1answer
101 views

Dirac Equation in RQM (as opposed to QFT) is written in which representation?

In introductory Quantum Mechanics treatments it is common to see the Schrödinger's equation being written, simply as: $$-\dfrac{\hbar^2}{2m}\nabla^2\Psi(\mathbf{r},t)+V(\mathbf{r})\Psi(\mathbf{r},t)=...
3
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5answers
194 views

Where does $\hat{P}\psi(x) = -i\hbar \partial_x \psi(x)$ come from?

It's a very basic question, where does the relation $$\hat{P}\psi(x) = -i\hbar \partial_x \psi(x)$$ for any square integrable $\psi(x)$ come into existence? Some texts I found states that the above ...
0
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1answer
83 views

Eigenstates of position and momentum operators in QM

In Griffiths pages 103-105 "Introduction to Quantum Mechanics" 2nd editiion he states that the eigenfunctions of the position and momentum operators are $$g_y(x) = \delta(x-y)$$ where the eigenvalue ...
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4answers
2k views

What is a wave function in simple language?

In my textbook it is given that 'The wave function describes the position and state of the electron and its square gives the probability density of electrons.' Can someone give me a very ...
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1answer
152 views

About 'de Broglie hypothesis' and the double slit experiment

EDIT: As i mentioned in my original question, i do not have the background to fully understand @Timaeus answer (which was very detailed indeed). I would appreciate if someone could give a more '...
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2answers
92 views

Does uncertainty exist without consciousness? [closed]

How can uncertainty exist without conscious beings calling something uncertain? When you look at the uncertainty principle, it only makes sense if consciousness collapses, disturbs, interfere's with ...
10
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1answer
162 views

What is known about the hydrogen atom in $d$ spatial dimensions?

In a first (or second) course on quantum mechanics, everyone learns how to solve the time-independent Schrödinger equation for the energy eigenstates of the hydrogen atom: $$ \left(-\frac{\hbar^2}{2\...
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2answers
2k views

Mathematical explanation of quantum teleportation

I am now studying quantum teleportation. I get what the process is like but I'm wondering why it happens this way. You've got two entangled particles A and B whose wavefunctions are entangled. You ...
0
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1answer
74 views

Propagating a Gaussian wavepacket backwards in time

So, I'm following the MIT OCW lectures on 8.04 quantum mechanics by Prof. Allan Adams. I have the expression for the probability distribution of a gaussian wavepacket for a free particle situation. No ...
3
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1answer
47 views

Behavior of atom's wave packets in a gas

It is my understanding that the wave packet of a free localized particle spreads with time. My question is what is the best description of the particles in a gas inside a closed container: Do they ...
8
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4answers
432 views

Is it possible for $\Delta x$ ($\sigma_x$) of any free particle wave packet to be decreasing at any time?

Consider any wave packet describing a free particle (so no potential or other forces acting on it). Then it can be shown that $\Delta p$ does not change in time. However, my question is what happens ...
36
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6answers
3k views

Does Heisenberg's uncertainty under time evolution always grow?

Recently there have been some interesting questions on standard QM and especially on uncertainty principle and I enjoyed reviewing these basic concepts. And I came to realize I have an interesting ...
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2answers
54 views

What makes the probability distribution of a wavefunction in QM intrinsic? [closed]

I know that the usual interpretation of the wavefunction in QM is that it´s associated with a probability distribution of measurable quantities. Not a deterministic probability (like the probabilities ...
0
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0answers
22 views

Overtone Transition Probability

For an anharmonic potential, like the morse potential, higher order transitions (overtone) with $\Delta n=\pm2,\pm3,..$ are allowed. How do I calculate the probability $P$ for such transitions? My ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Rate of the increase of width of a Gaussian wavepacket

So, I'm following the MIT OCW lectures on 8.04 quantum mechanics by Prof. Allan Adams. I have the expression for the probability distribution of a gaussian wavepacket for a free particle situation. No ...
11
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0answers
153 views

What's the lowest nuclear charge $Z < 1$ that will support a bound two-electron ion $(Z,2e^-)$?

In my programming project I calculate the minimal energy of an atom with 2 electrons in the $L=0, S=0$ state, using a Hylleraas wave function. The values I find for $Z=2$ (He) and $Z=1$ (H$^-$) are ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Born Interpretation of Wave Function

I have just started Griffiths Intro to QM. I was studying Born's interpretation of Wave function and it says that the square of the modulus of the wave function is a measure of the probability of ...
0
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0answers
66 views

Usage of Complex Numbers in Quantum Mechanics [duplicate]

In Griffiths 2nd Edition Quantum Mechanics page 148, it says when describing the eigenfunction to a part of the central potential problem as $$\mathrm e^{i m \phi}$$ "In electrodynamics we would ...
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2answers
155 views

Quantum eraser double slit experiment

In the quantum eraser double slit experiment, does the photon (or wavefunction) pass through one slit or both slits when different polarizers are placed over the slits?
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0answers
58 views

Finding $\psi(0)$ using Schrodinger equation with potential $U(x) = q\delta(x)$

I am having some trouble answering the following question in my "Advanced Quantum Mechanics" course: Using the integral equation: $$\psi(x) = Ae^{ikx} + Be^{-ikx} - \int_{-\infty}^{\infty}G^{\pm}(...
0
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1answer
57 views

Interpreting group velocity of free particle wave packet

I am trying to understand the concept of group velocity of a free particle wave packet: $$\Psi(x,t) = \frac{1}{\sqrt{2 \pi}}\int_{-\infty}^{\infty} \phi(k)e^{ikx}e^{-\frac{i \hbar k^2 t}{2m}}dk.$$ ...
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0answers
24 views

3d wave packet form of a free particle

Consider the 3d wave packet of a free particle moving along the x-axis. The wave packet will have components in the y and z dimensions as well as the x dimension. What form do they take? Are they ...
1
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1answer
40 views

What processes create or destroy information?

From a classical standpoint, it seems pretty clear that information can be easily lost. If you knock over a bookshelf and the books fall out, it seems like their initial order on the shelf cannot be ...
0
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0answers
23 views

Solving traveling wave using the shooting method

The spatially-dependent Hodgkin-Huxley equation for a cylindrical dendrite or unmyelinated axon: where $\frac{a}{2\rho}\frac{\partial^2V}{\partial x^2}$ is a diffusion term $a$ is the fiber radius, ...
0
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1answer
26 views

Connection between singlet, triplet two-electron states and the Slater determinant

I'm confused about a number of things concerning two-electron systems and spin. Here is (perhaps too much) exposition, skip to "the problem" if you want: Consider the helium atom in the simplified ...
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0answers
64 views

How did Max Born come up with his rule? [duplicate]

In his rule, he stated that the probability is norm-squared of wave function, $|\psi|^2$. And as far as I knew, no one else at that time had "right" interpretation of the wave function. Even ...
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2answers
93 views

Is the Wave Function a Unitary Operator? [closed]

A unitary operator can be represented as an exponential $$e^{iA}$$ and as we represent the wave function in general as $$e^{i k x}.$$ Does that mean that the wavefunction is unitary as the exponent is ...
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0answers
30 views

Parts of the Quark Wavefunction

Quarks are fermions meaning that they have an antisymmetric wavefunction. Under particle exchange the sign of the wavefunction. The wavefunction is made up of a few different parts $$ \psi_{Total} = \...
4
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2answers
106 views

Where the time-dependent wavefunction $\Psi(\vec{x},t)$ lies?

Supose $\vec{x}=(x,y,z)\in \mathbb{R}^3$. The state of a physical system is described by the function $\Psi(\vec{x},t)$, where it must satisfy $$\int_{\mathbb{R}^3} d^3\vec{x}\;\vert\Psi(\vec{x},t)\...