Wavefunction collapse amounts to the apparent reduction of a wavefunction consisting of a superposition of several eigenstates to a single eigenstate (by "observation"). It underlies measurement in quantum mechanics and connects the wave function with classical observables, in a thermodynamically ...

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Does measurement, quantum in particular, always increase the total entropy?

Measurement of a quantum observable (in an appropriate, old-fashioned sense) necessarily involves coupling to a system with a macroscopically large number of degrees of freedom. Entanglement with this ...
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370 views

Double slit experiment; evidence of wavefunction collapse

This video shows the change of a photon's interference pattern in real time of the Young's single and double slit experiment. In this video it is claimed that by adding a detector to view how the ...
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39 views

Energy Conservation in Changing Potential Well

If you prepare a particle in a basis state, $|n\rangle$ of an infinite potential well of length $L$, the energy of that state will be $\langle E\rangle = E_n$, with zero variance. If you then ...
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325 views

Transition from one state to another in Quantum Mechanics

When we measure an electron's position we know that the wave function $\psi$ peaks at the measured position and the wave function as a function of momentum is a harmonic function. When it makes the ...
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7answers
16k views

Why does observation collapse the wave function?

In one of the first lectures on QM we are always taught about Young's experiment and how particles behave either as waves or as particles depending on whether or not they are being observed. I want to ...
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4answers
261 views

Many-worlds interpretation

Regarding many-worlds interpretation as an alternative explanation to Copenhagen. If we take the generation or possibility of alternative universes as an explanation for the collapse of wavefunction ...
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Is wavefunction collapse “global”?

I have the feeling that the premises of this question may not be coherent (so to speak), but here goes: Suppose we have a system $X$ in a quantum superposition between states $0$ and $1$, say, with ...
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5answers
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Does the observer or the camera collapse the wave function in the double slit experiment?

Ok so if we setup a camera before the slit we will find a single photon and will follow through accordingly, likewise by having a camera setup after the slit, we can retroactivly collapse the wave ...
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Linear Combinations of Energy Eigenfunctions in 1D

Given that a particle is in a state defined by the wavefunction: $$\Psi (x,t) = \psi_0(x)e^{-iE_0t/\hbar}+\psi_1(x)e^{-iE_1t/\hbar}$$ where $\psi_0(x)$ and $\psi_1(x)$ are the energy eigenfunctions of ...
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52 views

Wavefunction Collapse

I believe my Lecturer and the textbook have contradicted one another. My lecturer gave the example that if the spatial part of the wavefunction of a particle is given by $\psi(x) = c_1\psi_1(x) + c_2\...
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74 views

Can't many-worlds interpretation explain wavefunction collapse?

According to the many-worlds interpretation when universe splits in interaction, the observer in each universe measures corresponding pure state thus seeing collapse. Well, it may be an interpretation,...
0
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28 views

Given any two quantum states and the information that the system is in one of these two states

Given any two quantum states and the information that the system is in one of these two states, one cannot reliably devise a single measurement which could determine with certainty which state the ...
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Precedence and quantum entanglement: The Alain Aspect experiment in spacetime

Recall that the spin components of a spin-entangled pair do not exist until one of the pair undergoes quantum observation, at which time both of the pair immediately obtain quantum random opposing ...
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2answers
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How does really the “wave function collapse” work? [closed]

It's usually said that "the direct observation of a process makes the wave function of the system to collapse". How does really that process happen? What exactly means for a wave function to collapse?...
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38 views

How do we know that there is a wavefunction which collapse?

How do we know that there actually is a wavefunction in the first place which collapse. How do we know that there is a transition from some linear combination of the eigenfunctions to a single one? ...
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5answers
1k views

Is the wave function of a particle re-created after a measurement stops?

Yeah, I haven't quite understood, or been told, what happens to, for example an electron and its wavefunction, when you stop to measure it. I mean, an electron has a wave function describing its ...
5
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3answers
167 views

Successor to Copenhagen Interpretation as Orthodox Interpreation of Quantum Mechanics

First, I read the questions FAQ for this and I hope this does not violate the rules. I am not asking for personal opinion, but for observations of hard evidence of trends on this subject. When I ...
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1answer
890 views

Superposition and the Winning Jackpot Numbers

Let's say I buy myself a lottery ticket (Mega-Millions). I have $\frac{1}{175,711,536}$ chance of winning. Before I tune on the tv/radio and listen to the winning numbers (i.e. make an observation), ...
5
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2answers
416 views

How is decoherence due to the environment compatible with the Copenhagen interpretation?

Let's say that "decoherence" is that transition from a pure quantum state to a mixed state due to interactions with the environment. (A reasonable definition?) How is that compatible with the ...
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5answers
199 views

Does measurement change the evolution of wave function?

Basically any measurement is on wave function $|\psi\rangle$ is done by operator $X$ such that $X|\psi\rangle$ results observable $x$ with some probability. But what happens to $|\psi\rangle$? Does ...
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671 views

How does a Wavefunction collapse?

I have been wondering and researching... How does a wavefunction collapse into one state?More specifically, what conditions cause a wavefunction for a quantum particle to collapse? Does this have to ...
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1answer
45 views

Understanding wave functions of matter waves

The wave functions of matter waves give the probability density of the particle being at a certain location. Does this arise because as an outside observer, we have incomplete information about the ...
1
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1answer
65 views

Quantum eraser experiment with unbalanced interfereometers

In quantum eraser experiments, which path information is made available and then destroyed before the photon hits the screen. Now, say we had an experiment in which a photon is sent to a double slit ...
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207 views

Quantum double slit which-way problem

I recall reading that if you put a parallel polarizing filter over one slit and a perpendicularly polarizing filter over the other slit, and send a singe photon to the slits, then there is no ...
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2answers
306 views

Double slit experiment paradox

Two observers – A & B - conduct a single double slit experiment and watch the same detector screen for the appearance of an interference pattern. A separate detector records which slit each ...
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2answers
388 views

Has this experiment really demonstrated wave-function collapse?

My question is: why did the following experiment claim that it had demonstrated the wave-function collapse? Experimental proof of nonlocal wavefunction collapse for a single particle using ...
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62 views

Operator and apparatus in quantum mechanics? [closed]

If $L$ is an Hermitian matrix associated with an apparatus acting on state $\Psi$, how does the state vector $\Psi$ collapse or change according to matrix arithmetic?
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91 views

Current quantum theory of interference

I have always thought that the quantum theory states that interference occurs when photons behave like waves and two or more possible paths exist. Interference can then be destroyed if the path of the ...
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76 views

Wave Function Collapse and Which Path Information

From what I understand, wave function collapse occurs when a photon/wave/particle/whatevertheheckitis which was previously in a superposition of states, collapses to one state. Now, in a double slit ...
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4answers
297 views

Why does the electron wave function collapse in a double slit experiment?

Did the electron wave function collapse in the double slit experiment due to being observed, OR is it that the electron wave function collapsed because the instrument used to measure it physically ...
3
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3answers
617 views

Entanglement and the double slit experiment

Is the double slit experiment an example of entanglement when it seems as if the photon is going through both slits? Or put another way, is it at this stage when we attempt measurement we see a photon ...
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2answers
66 views

What exactly causes quantum wave function collapse? [duplicate]

I've heard many things, such as the wave function collapses when the particle or system it determines is observed. But then I've heard that if we consider that to be the case, it's incomplete. What ...
3
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3answers
192 views

Wave function collapse and Schrodinger's equation without measurement

Will wave function collapse without measurement? Since all matters are described by wave functions, then in principle, I should be able to describe wave function collapse by Schrodinger's equation. (...
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0answers
91 views

What would be the abilities of a wave function collapsing oracle? [closed]

Although the Bell's theorem dismiss local hidden variables as an explanation of the quantum variability, there is nothing to prevent an observer to see the occurrence of a wave function collapse as ...
0
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1answer
113 views

Wave Function State Reduction As a Result of Quantum Measurement

This is a question about indirect quantum measurement, involving an observable of an object of interest and a probe that is used to measure that observable. In this experiment, an observable of the ...
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859 views

State collapse in the Heisenberg picture

I've been studying quantum mechanics and quantum field theory for a few years now and one question continues to bother me. The Schrödinger picture allows for an evolving state, which evolves through ...
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1answer
94 views

Is the collapsed wavefunction a solution of Time-dependent Schrodinger equation?

For measurement of any observable associated with the particle, should the wavefunction after collapse be a solution of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation? A general solution of the time ...
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Measurement of position after collapse of a wavefunction

Suppose I have a wavefunction which collapses to a certain eigenstate after a measurement of energy. In that state, I perform a calculation of position and obtain a certain position value, say $x_0$. ...
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4answers
838 views

How does wave function collapse when I measure position?

Text books say that when you measure a particle's position, its wave function collapses to one eigenstate, which is a delta function at that location. I'm confused here. A measurement always have ...
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59 views

Time Asymmetry in Quantum Mechanics

I am reading the book "Emperor's New Mind" and have a question related to time asymmetry in state vector reduction (p.458) in quantum mechanics. Consider the following situation, as presented in the ...
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3answers
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DIY Quantum Eraser Experiment by the Scientific American: Is this really quantum?

Click here for the publication. Having performed this experiment, I have gotten clean results. Essentially, a double slit is made by putting an photon beam in the way of a wire with orthogonal ...
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1answer
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If Alice is moving at relatavistic speeds compared to Bob, is collapse still simultaneous?

I have read some papers about experimental proof of non-locality involving a laser that goes through a beam-splitter and then each "half" goes to an observer (traditionally "Alice" and "Bob"). It has ...
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2answers
48 views

Collapsing a wave function without hitting the detector

If a free particle is placed at the origin (in 1D) with a wave function that consists of a superposition of the particle moving in both the +/- X direction, and a single detector is placed on the ...
4
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3answers
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Does decoherence explain all instances of wave function collapse?

Specifically, how can decoherence explain the appearance of flecks of metallic silver on a photographic plate when exposed to the very weak light of a distant star? EDIT: Perhaps the advocates of ...
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Wavefunction collapse and relativity [closed]

In classical QM, when I measure the wave function of a system, e.g. the position of an electron somewhere in a box, its wave function collapses instantaneously to some classical position. But how fast ...
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34 views

What are the exact setups to observe a wave function and its collapsed state?

I was reading this article: http://io9.com/5528321/how-smart-do-you-need-to-be-to-collapse-a-wave-function and I need some clarification on the experiment setup. My current understanding is that if ...
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Has the double-slit experiment been performed with animals as the observers?

As the title says, has the double-slit experiment been performed with animals (not humans) as the observers? If yes, which animal was used and what was the result?
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31 views

At what point do quantum wave functions collapse? [duplicate]

At what point do quantum wave functions collapse? Let me give you two examples to make that question more clear: Let us think of the double slit experiment. We humans see the light at certain ...
3
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4answers
256 views

What does quantum phenomena exist as prior to observation?

It's been said that according to the Schrodinger equation, independent of observation, particles exist in a state of a wave function, which is a series of potentialities rather than actual objects. ...
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106 views

Can the Born rule be derived? [duplicate]

$\renewcommand{ket}[1]{|#1\rangle}$ If we have a particle and we know the initial state $|\psi\rangle$ of everything that is relevant, and we know the full Hamiltonian $H$, then we should be able to ...