4
votes
2answers
139 views

What is the physical reason behind linearity of Schrodinger's equation?

What is the physical reason for Schrodinger equation to be linear? Though in physics many interactions or dynamics are found non linear.
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Wave function - Working towards Orthonormal solution

As you can see below, the two pages attached describe how to obtain the final solution of orthonormality. I do not completely follow the discussion but I will talk you through what I DO understand ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views
0
votes
0answers
109 views

Superposition and density matrix. What are these states?

I just wanted to understand the following. Let's stay with the harmonic oscillator in QM, just to have an example at hand. First, there are all the different states for $n=1,2,...$. (Let's call them ...
0
votes
0answers
66 views

Quantum eraser double slit experiment

In the quantum eraser double slit experiment, does the photon (or wavefunction) pass through one slit or both slits when different polarizers are placed over the slits?
0
votes
1answer
604 views

Expectation value of total energy for the quantum harmonic oscillator [closed]

A particles unnormalized wavefunction is given as $$\psi(x)=2\psi_1+\psi_2+2\psi_3.$$ How can I find $\langle E\rangle $ without calculating $\langle T\rangle$ or $\langle V\rangle $ ...
0
votes
2answers
221 views

Is normalization consistent with Schrodinger's Equation?

Schrodinger's Equation does not set a limit on the size of wave functions but to normalize a wave function a limit must be set. How is this consistent physically and mathematically with Schrodinger's ...
8
votes
3answers
517 views

If superposition is possible in QM, why do we often assume systems are already in their eigenstates?

My understanding is that an arbitrary quantum-mechanical wavefunction can be written as a linear combination of eigenfunctions of some Hermitian operator, most commonly the Hamiltonian; when a ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

What does superposition mean in quantum mechanics?

What does superposition mean in quantum mechanics? When I say $A+B=C$ (forces). I can mean push something with force $A$ + force $B$ together, and that is same as I push it with force $C$. But when ...