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2
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4answers
109 views

Photons to Represent a Wave

I fear that I have a fundamental misconception about the "wave particle duality" of light, but in a related question, the answerer said, in some sense, that a light wave propagates until it hits ...
2
votes
1answer
313 views

Why doesn't De Broglie's wave equation work for photons?

Well, as I am learning about quantum physics, one of the first topics I came across was De Broglie's wave equation. $$\frac{h}{mc} = \lambda$$ As is obvious, it relates the wavelength to the mass of ...
9
votes
1answer
122 views

Do particles behave like electromagnetic waves?

From double-slit experiments we know particles have wave-like behavior: they statistically form an interference pattern. My question is: Is this wave-like behavior similar to the photons' behavior? ...
0
votes
2answers
93 views

Particles Associated With Gravitational Waves

I've been reading about linearized GR and the study of gravitational waves, and an odd thought popped into my head. According to wave-particle duality (admittedly, usually used in quantum mechanics!), ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

How do the wave properties of an electron change with its motion?

How do the wave properties of an electron change with its motion? What about when it is stationary?
3
votes
3answers
239 views

The Gluon - Does It Exhibit Wave Properties?

Do Gluons have frequencies and wavelengths? I assume that they do, but have been unable to find anything on point in SE or Wikipedia. Just beginning to study university-level physics here.
2
votes
1answer
97 views

Wave Packet in Curved Spacetime

It is known that the classical equation of motion for a scalar field wave packet on a curved spacetime background gives the geodesic trajectory (the e.o.m. is $(\nabla_\mu \nabla^\mu + m^2) \Phi=0$). ...
3
votes
3answers
203 views

Light has a wave particle duality, how do we know?

I've been told my whole life that light is either a wave or a particle. When it's traveling through space, it's a wave. When it hits a wall, or a photo-sensitive chemical strip or something similar, ...
3
votes
5answers
352 views

Wave/particle duality

Apologies if this has been asked before (I did check and I believe it wasn't). I have a question about the particle/wave duality of photons (or other particles). Depending on what and how we measure ...
2
votes
4answers
87 views

What exactly is meant by “observed” when talking about the wave-particle duality?

When talking about the wave-particle duality, teachers and books say that when you send a single photon through a slit, it makes a wave pattern. But if you send that particle through the slit and "you ...
21
votes
8answers
3k views

Is the wave-particle duality a real duality?

I often hear about the wave-particle duality, and how particles exhibit properties of both particles and waves. I most recently heard this in this video. However, I wonder; is this actually a duality? ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Will an electron gun fire behind it?

If an electron travels as a wave, can it therefore not be aimed with any precision? If you fire an electron gun, can't you aim it at a particular slit? If the electron travels as a wave, will an ...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

If light is an electric and (magnetic field), how can it be absorbed?

I was wondering how light or any electromagnetic radiation can be "absorbed" if it consists of electric and magnetic fields. For example if there is a charge at point A, and the light reaches point ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Mathematical derivation of interference pattern for electrons?

One of the most famous experiments in quantum mechanics in the context of wave-particle duality is certainly passing a beam of electrons through two slits, which results in an interference pattern ...
2
votes
2answers
73 views

Logic of the 'imaginary wave function collapse' argument in Double Slit experiment

My question is in regards to the stance that the 'wave function collapse' is not an actual physical occurrence. That is, you are not, by observation, changing the particles position from a wave to a ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Trying to measure travel time of photons in a double slit experiment

So far I'm only tasting the quantum mechanics. Haven't gone very deep into the mathematics of it yet. I read about the double slit experiment, and the weird consequences of it: if you put a detector ...
14
votes
1answer
883 views

Is the Uncertainty Principle valid for information about the past?

My layman understanding of the Uncertainty Principle is that you can't determine the both the position and momentum of a particle at the same point in time, because measuring one variable changes the ...
0
votes
2answers
44 views

Dual particle-wave behavior

If electrons and photons, and possibly more particles, exhibit dual character, why don't physicists create a new classification for them? Why describe them as both waves and particles. Why not rather ...
1
vote
2answers
157 views

wave-particle duality and entanglement

By fundamental definition of a entangled system we can say that if we know the quantum state of one subsystem then we can describe the state of another subsystem. A particle possess wave-particle ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Crystal diffraction for waves vs particles

I thought that I understand the "Bragg's Law" understanding of crystal diffraction, but recently I read something that made me confused. I understand that if the planes in the crystal have ...
22
votes
3answers
1k views

Do photons occupy space?

Total noob here. I realize that photons do not have a mass. However, they must somehow occupy space, as I've read that light waves can collide with one another. Do photons occupy space? and if so, ...
2
votes
2answers
42 views

What is being deprived when a photon is being watched in double slit experiment?

How are photons being watched in the double slit experiment? What exactly does being observed mean, as it is obviously changes the state of the photon somehow - it must be depriving the photon of ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Finding speed of light by $c=f\lambda$?

When considering EM radiation as waves it is said that it is electric and magnetic fields that oscillate with time. Therefore $f$ is not frequency of distance but of electromagnetic fields. I have ...
0
votes
1answer
99 views

Double slit experiment observation

In the double-slit experiment, if you shoot particles through the slits one by one and observe which slit they travel through, is there still an interference pattern on the screen behind the slits? If ...
1
vote
2answers
48 views

Do photons in interferometer violate the law of conservation of mass?

I mean Mach-Zehnder Interferometer, where light split into two shortest paths. Is light after splitting wave or particle? Is it a particle? How could one photon change to two? If the wave, does the ...
5
votes
2answers
107 views

A modified version of the famous double-slit experiment

AFAIK, all the double slit experiments that were performed uses a light source (or electron source...) that emits photons at a "perpendicular" angle as this image shows: (will call it experiment 1) ...
3
votes
2answers
57 views

How does a wave packet acts rigidly?

Particles can be represented as wave packet. So how do particles get scattered? Waves superimpose on one another, they don't bounce off of on one another.
4
votes
3answers
79 views

Which side of wave-particle duality to choose in a given situation

How does one know whether, in treating a certain problem, one should consider particles as waves or as point-like objects? Are there certain guidelines regarding this?
1
vote
2answers
56 views

Does a light wave that has been cancelled by another light wave continue traveling forward?

I imagine that if a light wave is cancelled out by another light wave, it would still continue to exist as a photon that is traveling at the speed of light--only without a wavelength. Would it behave ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Subnuclear physics vs wave function

This question is more a philosophical question than a physics one. When we appreciate particle physics we study that in order to explain some experimental results we have to introduce a new particle ...
0
votes
3answers
67 views

De Broglie wavelength of slow moving macroscopic objects

I've seen numerous examples where the De Broglie wavelengths of macroscopic objects such as bullets and baseballs have been calculated. However, in each case, the objects are moving fast and the ...
0
votes
2answers
91 views

Is light electromagnetic waves or quantumn particle waves? [duplicate]

Is light electromagnetic waves or quantum physical particle waves. Or are they the same? Note: My question is specifically how electromagnetism plays into the quantum physics and the double slit ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

Understanding wave functions

I'm currently writing an essay on the measurement problem, and I'm not quite certain that I've fully understood the purpose of the wave function, in that does the following sentence make sense with ...
5
votes
2answers
256 views

How does the frequency of a particle manifest itself?

In terms of wave-particle duality for, let's say a photon; how would the frequency practically manifest/demonstrate itself? Like, i understand that the frequency is related to the energy a particle ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

De Broglie Wavelengths

I have a working knowledge of wave-particle duality, I think. I know the de Broglie wavelength is a sort of probability of finding a particle in a specific position, and is calculated by ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Interpretation of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle

Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is one of the most fundamental principles on which quantum mechanics is based on. But it is also one of the most confusing laws we encounter. My doubt is whether the ...
4
votes
1answer
88 views

How do you measure a particle's postion or momentum?

This question is about the Uncertainty Principle $$\sigma_x \sigma_p ~\ge ~\frac{\hbar}{2}.$$ Looking at the maths, I understant why the uncertainty in the poistion increases as the uncertainty in ...
7
votes
4answers
579 views

Quantum Wave Mechanics

I am studying QM-I these days. Now, I just think of the wave function as just a mathematical function that defines the state of the particle at an instant and from it you can extract various ...
0
votes
4answers
405 views

Why complex functions for explaining wave particle duality?

I have this very bad habit of going to the scratch, discarding all the developments of a theory and worldly knowledge, and ask some fundamental (mostly stupid and naive, as some may say) questions as ...
1
vote
2answers
211 views

Size of a photon

When detecting radio waves in space, we use very large telescopes or arrays of telescopes. But according to QM, aren't photons point particles when measured? Does a photon with a large wavelength ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

How is it possible for light to be a wave and a particle? [duplicate]

I have always been interested in Physics, and lots of people say that light is a particle and a wave. How is it possible? How can a photon (a light particle) be a wave as well, when its a particle? ...
7
votes
7answers
929 views

Why can't we have a wave of particles?

I understand the nature of light can be complex and has extensive theories/experimental data. We hear light can be both a wave and particle, so why can't it be both, a wave of particles?
-3
votes
1answer
72 views

If the wave function can be collapsed, can we collapse the particle function? [closed]

No doubt it's been questioned before so what is the theory or experiment? If there is an experiment.
2
votes
1answer
66 views

Which types of particles are affected by the wave-particle duality?

If we take the double slit experiment as a way of demonstrating the wave-particle duality, which types of particles would show an interference pattern? For example, I know that electrons show such a ...
2
votes
0answers
68 views

de Broglie formula inconsistency

I recently stumbled across a small peculiarity I don't understand: According to de Broglie, the frequency of a matterwave can be written as $f=\frac{E}{h}$, and its wavelength as $\lambda = ...
3
votes
2answers
261 views

Photons-Wave/particle duality

I know that photons and electrons and such are said to have a wave particle duality, but what does that mean for a photon? When light strikes an object, are many photons emitted, enough to draw ...
1
vote
3answers
194 views

What is wave particle duality? [duplicate]

I am sort of confused about this. Wave particle duality says that sub atomic particles are waves. There is something more though. What is the actual meaning of wave particle duality?
13
votes
7answers
2k views

Does electron in wave form have mass?

I heard from my lecturer that electron has dual nature. For that instance in young's double slit experiment electron exhibits as a particle at ends but it acts as a wave in between the ends. It under ...
2
votes
0answers
77 views

Constructive and destructive interference in De Broglie matter waves

I'm a little confused about matter waves and especially interference. $\lambda = h/p$ The denominator is momentum and is thus reliant on mass. If we assume that the property holds for particles ...
7
votes
7answers
5k views

Why does observation collapse the wave function?

In one of the first lectures on QM we are always taught about Young's experiment and how particles behave either as waves or as particles depending on whether or not they are being observed. I want to ...