Use this tag for questions relating to the "wave-nature of particles" or the "particle-nature of waves" as they are often discussed in quantum mechanics, where a single object has properties of both classical particles and classical waves.

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Two contradictory groups of statements from two different books on quantum physics

There are two contradictory groups of statements from two different famous books on quantum physics. Which one is correct? Group (1) : Following statements are from Berkeley Physics Course Vol. 3, ...
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1answer
109 views

Why one should follow Snell's law for shortest time?

whenever two media and two velocities are involved, one must follow Snell's law if one wants to take the shortest time. Why snells law must be followed to travel diffrent media in shortest time? ...
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2answers
54 views

Atom Particles Relationships

I am an agriculture student, and we study tons of chemistry, and despite I took the exams I still have a good doubt on atoms. Through my studies I would say electrons are very tiny containers of ...
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7answers
15k views

Why does observation collapse the wave function?

In one of the first lectures on QM we are always taught about Young's experiment and how particles behave either as waves or as particles depending on whether or not they are being observed. I want to ...
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2answers
388 views

Wave packet in curved spacetime

It is known that the classical equation of motion for a scalar field wave packet on a curved spacetime background gives the geodesic trajectory (the e.o.m. is $(\nabla_\mu \nabla^\mu + m^2) \Phi=0$). ...
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0answers
92 views

Modern interpretation of wave-particle duality

As far as I understand, in the early days of quantum theory there was quite a lot of debate over how to interpret what it meant for a quantum mechanical object to exhibit both wave-like and ...
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1answer
136 views

About 'de Broglie hypothesis' and the double slit experiment

EDIT: As i mentioned in my original question, i do not have the background to fully understand @Timaeus answer (which was very detailed indeed). I would appreciate if someone could give a more ...
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0answers
36 views

Help needed for Simple derivation for duality of matter

A teacher told showed me a way to derive an equation which shows the duality of matter. We know, $E=hc/\lambda$. and $E=mc^2$ So, $hc/\lambda=mc^2$ We get, $p$ ( momentum ) = $h/\lambda$. How ...
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2answers
262 views

From the viewpoint of field theory and Derrick's theorem, what's the classical field configuration corresponding to particle? Is it a wavepacket?

In the framework of QM, we have known that particle, like electron, cannot be a wavepacket, because if it is a wavepacket then it will become "fatter" due to dispersion and it's impossible. However ...
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4answers
132 views

Why can't the wave model for radiation account for the photoelectric effect?

While I understand the effect of varying wavelength and frequencies on the photoelectric effect, I can't seem to turn my mind around that question... I suspect it has to do with quantas and the non ...
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0answers
42 views

Double-slit intensity distribution for particles

For waves, the intensity pattern for the double-slit experiment is given by the following equation (as of David Morin's notes on waves) $$ I(x) = I(0) \frac{D}{\sqrt{x^{2} + D^{2}}}cos^{2} \left ( ...
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1answer
40 views

Can gravitational waves interfere polarize or show any other properties of stndard waves

Is it possible for gravitational waves to be able to produce phenomenon such as interference and polarization etc. which are observed in standard waves. Also is it possible for gravitational waves to ...
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3answers
103 views

Does an electromagnetic wave necessarily contain many photons? [duplicate]

I've often come across people saying from a quantum physics standpoint that an electromagnetic wave necessarily contains many photons. But doesn't the double-slit experiment conducted one photon ...
3
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1answer
123 views

How do (and don’t) particles emerge from fields?

I am aware of the following field- and particle-like notions: QFT particle, a unit of excitation in (the Fock space of) a QFT; SR field, an extremal $A = A(\mathbf x)$ of a Lorentz-invariant action; ...
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1answer
39 views

How does sunlight undergo interference as shown in the video?

As far as I know, for interference to happen in a double-slit experiment, the light source should be coherent and monochromatic. If that is the case then how come sunlight undergo interference and ...
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2answers
38 views

Evaluating double-slit experiment for wave-particle duality

Is it possible that the wave-like behavior of particles in double slit experiments is just an outcome of particle distribution? Can we regard or treat a normal or Gaussian distribution as wave-like? ...
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1answer
66 views

Mathematical proof of Bohr's complementarity principle

Complementarity principle, in physics, tenet that a complete knowledge of phenomena on atomic dimensions requires a description of both wave and particle properties. Depending on the experimental ...
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1answer
30 views

why laser beams don't get reflected (or knocked away) when they intersect with each other?

laser beams are photons with the same frequency and the same direction, but according to the wave-particle duality, photons have mass. but if we shoot two masses and they intersect at some point ...
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2answers
62 views

Single slit diffraction - wave vs particle view

If monochromatic light is shot through a single slit onto a screen, we can analyze the pattern on the screen using wave properties. This analysis is done assuming the wavelength is constant. But with ...
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4answers
886 views

Why does light diffract only through slits?

We can see diffraction of light if we allow light to pass through a slit, but why doesn't diffraction occur if we obstruct light using some other object, say a block? Why are shadows formed? Why ...
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2answers
59 views

Observer in the double slit experiment with photons

In the double slit experiment with photons, the interacting observer is an instrument, detector… If you replace the detector with a piece of metal with the same mass as the mass of the detector, the ...
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0answers
51 views

Why call it a particle and not a wave pulse?

My physics textbook says that photoelectric emission provides conclusive evidence for the particle theory of light. Apparently, since photoelectric emission only works at certain frequencies, we can ...
3
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3answers
101 views

Can particles at rest have wave nature?

Can particles have wave nature even when they are at rest? I think this is possible due to the formation of standing waves
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3answers
104 views

How does wave-particle duality describe Photoelectric effect?

I don't know if electrons work as particles or waves or maybe both in photoelectric effect. How is Photoelectric Effect actually described by Wave-Particle Duality?
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1answer
54 views

Could particle wave duality be caused by gravity? [closed]

We know that light (and other particles) displays particle wave duality, or the ability to be a particle and a wave at the same time. After that it becomes confusing. We also know that gravity is a ...
7
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1answer
349 views

What was Newton's own explanation of Newton's rings?

What was Newton's own explanation of Newton's rings? Newton advocated a corpuscular theory of light, but his rings would most conveniently be explained by a wave theory. How did he explain his own ...
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2answers
65 views

What would diffraction of a macroscopic object look like?

I read an interesting question here in the forum (Will a football (soccer) diffract?) and came up with the following doubt: even though its diffraction angle is too small to be detected, if we had the ...
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3answers
3k views

The Dual Nature of Matter

I can't seem to understand the dual nature of matter completely. If electrons have a wave nature, then if two electrons were to collide, wouldn't they undergo interference and form an electron wave ...
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5answers
16k views

Can an electron be in two places at the same time?

So I've been reading a bit and watching some videos about the double slit experiment, and therefore the wave particle duality; I've also read this "implies" that a particle can be in two places at the ...
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2answers
73 views

Why do electrons/photons create an interference pattern in the double slit experiment? [duplicate]

So...if electrons and photons are both particles and they pass the two slits, why do they create an interference pattern as if they were waves? Now from what I've read, it's because of the ...
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1answer
114 views

How can a probability distribution have wavelength (de Broglie wavelength)?

The wave function described by Schrodinger's equation is interpreted as describing the probability of a particle in at any point in space, i.e. a probability distribution. Since this distribution ...
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3answers
16k views

Frequency of an electron

If frequency is defined as the cycles per time, then what is meant by "frequency of an electron"? If it refers to the rotation of electron around a nucleus, then which phenomenon is considered for a ...
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1answer
90 views

Is double slit interference due to EM/de Broglie waves? And how does this relate to quantum mechanical waves?

I'm really confused about the fact that there seems to be two types of waves at play: the EM wave, which I understand to be an actual fluctuation of EM fields in space, and this other type of bulk ...
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2answers
63 views

Question on matter waves

So,I just started this topic on modern physics in school that contained the concept of"de broglie waves" or "matter waves" and there are a few concepts that are unclear to me. Firstly, does a single ...
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1answer
83 views

What does the 'charge' of the electron transform into when the electron gets converted to wave? [closed]

Mathematically when a particle exhibits wave nature, its mass is supposed to be converted into energy. I want to know what happens to the charge of particle? what does the 'charge' of a non ...
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1answer
24 views

What happens to light when an optical cavity path length doubles instantaneously?

Let's say we have light contained in a cavity (of initial length $L$) and then instantaneously remove the second mirror, thus removing the barrier between the first and a third mirror which is some ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Light waves and water waves

I have an idea and i would like to have more information: If I drop a stone in the water some rings or waves will appear. Those rings are made of water and are behaving that particular way because of ...
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9answers
6k views

Is the wave-particle duality a real duality?

I often hear about the wave-particle duality, and how particles exhibit properties of both particles and waves. I most recently heard this in this video. However, I wonder; is this actually a duality? ...
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6answers
5k views

Is it wrong to say that an electron can be a wave?

In QM it is sometimes said that electrons are not waves but they behave like waves or that waves are a property of electrons. Perhaps it is better to speak of a wave function representing a particular ...
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1answer
192 views

Deducing from the double slit experiment that electrons mostly behave like particles

I saw this video of a lecture by Feynman where he said that electrons behave like particles when there is a photon source to detect which slit they pass through. Does this imply that electrons mostly ...
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2answers
842 views

Do particles behave like electromagnetic waves?

From double-slit experiments we know particles have wave-like behavior: they statistically form an interference pattern. My question is: Is this wave-like behavior similar to the photons' behavior? ...
2
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1answer
130 views

Which types of particles are affected by the wave-particle duality?

If we take the double slit experiment as a way of demonstrating the wave-particle duality, which types of particles would show an interference pattern? For example, I know that electrons show such a ...
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1answer
40 views

Understanding wave functions of matter waves

The wave functions of matter waves give the probability density of the particle being at a certain location. Does this arise because as an outside observer, we have incomplete information about the ...
1
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1answer
76 views

Why does compton scattering provide evidence for the particle nature of light?

I understand that compton scattering is modeled as a collision between a photon and an electron, but why does this conclusively prove that light can act as a particle? Why couldn't the same ...
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3answers
848 views

What does it mean that a wavevector is null?

I have derived geometric optics for gravitational waves and I am trying to interpret one of the results. I have \begin{equation} k_{\rho}k^{\rho}=0 \end{equation} for the wavevector. For the case ...
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3answers
272 views

Does wave-particle duality exist for gravitational waves?

For electromagnetic waves there exists a wave/particle duality: light sometimes behaves as a wave, and other times as a particle (photons). Does such a duality exist for gravitational waves? In other ...
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1answer
37 views

Number of photoelectrons vs Frequency

This is the graph plotted between photocurrent (proportional to number of photoelectrons) and potential applied with different frequencies. As it can be seen, the number of photoelectrons released ...
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2answers
1k views

Size of a photon

When detecting radio waves in space, we use very large telescopes or arrays of telescopes. But according to QM, aren't photons point particles when measured? Does a photon with a large wavelength ...
2
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0answers
56 views

Now that gravitational waves have been discovered, what does their particle version look like? [duplicate]

Duality dictates that gravitational waves should have a particle counterpart too, right? Will this in any way help solve the big problem of quantum gravity?
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0answers
12 views

Why is this result wrong for finding speed of a neutron in relation to deBroglie wavelength [duplicate]

So given a deBroglie wavelength 1.8nm and the equations E=hf and E=1/2mv^2 you can get v = 2h/m*(1.8*10^-9) but this is 2 times the expected value. Wherever I look online people use the momentum p ...