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1answer
250 views

Matter Waves Interference

When an EM wave diffracts, I can imagine that its EM field interacts with the charges in a certain obstacle thus inducing a wave behaviour on the charges of the matter that will interact with the EM ...
0
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1answer
69 views

Is it valid to calculate mass of electron using the speed of the wave packet and energy

A gaussian wave packet. It's peak is moving at speed v. We know the energy of the packet is E. Can I deduce the mass of the electron using $m=2E/v^2$
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2answers
102 views

What happens to the physical properties of electrons after diffraction?

Particle Wave duality shows us that waves and particles are the same thing. Therefore electrons can be viewed as both particles and waves. The wave properties of electrons can be seen in the double ...
-2
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1answer
397 views

Dual nature of Matter at gross level [duplicate]

Is the Dual nature (wave - particle duality) of Matter completely proved or just a theory and are the objects (water,rubber ball, car, apple etc.) that we see all around us in day to day life exhibit ...
0
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1answer
154 views

Light behaves as a particle or wave in this thought experiment?

Consider a metal plate, on which a light of appropriate wavelength is incident such that it creates an interference pattern. The wavelength is chosen such that it can cause detectable photo-electric ...
3
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2answers
175 views

When light is only considered as a particle, is it still considersed to be oscillating electic and magetic waves?

I have my head around wave-particle duality, however people tend to refer to light as either a wave or a particle in different situations. If I were to consider light as a particle am I still ...
0
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1answer
398 views

Particle nature of radio waves?

Is there any experiment that would show that radio waves (I am talking about macroscopic wavelength, say between 0.01m - 2m) are made out of individual photons? Sort of an equivalent of the ...
6
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1answer
1k views

How to tell theoretically whether an electron behaves as wave or particle

I have seen many questions on SE on the dual nature of electrons behaving in certain circumstances as particles and as waves in some other circumstance. There is one thing I couldn't get a clear ...
21
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2answers
2k views

What is a phonon?

I am trying to understand intuitively what a phonon is, but for the moment I find it quite difficult (having a limited background in quantum mechanics, an undergraduate course in non-relativistic QM). ...
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2answers
108 views

Why the wave-particle duality cannot be explained as a traveling-standing wave duality?

This would explain why speed and position cannot be measured at the same time, since either the wave would be traveling (speed) or enclosed and standing (position). The act of enclosing it (to be ...
1
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3answers
133 views

Why should nature of light(or any quantum object) depend on observation?

We know that, in the double slit experiment, observation changes the behavior of a quantum object, that it behaves like a particle when observed and a wave when not observed. But why should its nature ...
2
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4answers
686 views

If matter and light have dual-nature, shouldn't we able to explain the observed phenomenons using either wave or particle?

Historically wave and particle has been perceived as totally different phenomenons (before 20th century). Now is it widely accepted and there are experimental results to show that in fact both matter ...
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4answers
326 views

Fermion vs. Bosons and particle vs. wave: is there a link?

I'm puzzled since several years on this basic aspect of quantum mechanics. Quantum theory is supposed to describe particle-wave symmetry of our world. It also describes our universe in term of bosons ...
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3answers
725 views

Electromagnetic radiation and quanta

since electromagnetic radiation possess the property of both wave and particle(photon). and both theory are applicable but how we have to find out that which theory is suitable or applicable in ...
5
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3answers
469 views

Why does light diffract only through slits?

We can see diffraction of light if we allow light to pass through a slit, but why doesn't diffraction occur if we obstruct light using some other object, say a block? Why are shadows formed? Why ...
1
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0answers
104 views

Wave Particle duality because of discrete time?

If time is discrete, such as the Planck's length, would the transition from one frame of time to the next explain why it appears matter changes from a particle to a wave? During that infinitely small ...
0
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1answer
827 views

De-broglie wavelength in electron microscope

The de Broglie wavelength is given by $$\lambda\equiv\frac{h}{mv}$$ Now, if we have a small body, it's wavelength will be large when it is in motion. Similarly, a large body will have small ...
0
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1answer
168 views

Uncertainty and wave-trains

My textbook and the following extract from feynman's lectures present the same idea regarding wavetrains and uncertainty in their wavelengths. Why is it that a wavetrain confined to some space has an ...
2
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1answer
68 views

Radiation interactions: how is the transition from the “electric” regimen to “particle-like” regimen?

When we study the interaction of the electromagnetic radiation with free electrons we can find two different approaches in the literature: for low frequency (RF, light...) a classical view is used and ...
1
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1answer
93 views

Can this ratio be written any better?

This topic is closely related to previous topic where we were to calculate ratio $\lambda_e/\lambda_p$ for proton and electron with same velocities. This time we I want to know if it is possible to ...
0
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1answer
87 views

How can we calculate (relativisticly correct) ratio $\lambda_e/\lambda_p$ if proton and electron have same speeds

This question is about group/phase velocities and also De Brogilie wavelength. What I would like to know is how to derive ratio $\lambda_e/\lambda_p$ ($\lambda_e$ and $\lambda_p$ are De Broglie ...
3
votes
2answers
317 views

Photons-Wave/particle duality

I know that photons and electrons and such are said to have a wave particle duality, but what does that mean for a photon? When light strikes an object, are many photons emitted, enough to draw ...
1
vote
1answer
187 views

Relation/meaning between momentum and contours of constant equal phase of a wave function

Sometimes, mainly due to my limited knowledge of experimental modern physics, whenever I fancy and think about quantum physics, things appear really amusing and counter intuitive, and when if I don't ...
0
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1answer
124 views

Is there a hard upper bound to the deBroglie wavelength of a particle with vanishing momentum? [duplicate]

This is probably a stupid and simple question, but does the heisenberg uncertainty principle set this upper bound? That knowledge of the momentum is limited, so it can't reach a very low value and ...
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4answers
1k views

Are the Maxwell equations a correct description of the wave character of photons?

In basic quantum mechanics courses, one describes the evolution of quantum mechanics chronologically. Interference experiments with particles showed that particles should have a wave character; on the ...
-2
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1answer
124 views

Is light particle of wave?

We know that Young's double slit experiment shows that light is a wave. On the other hand photoelectric effect shows that light is made up of photons. How can light be both at the same time?
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2answers
159 views

Quantum Mechanical Interpretation of Water Waves?

So I have been exploring the idea of wave-particle duality and came across and interesting idea. Could water waves, be interpreted as particles in some context? If so, how would you observe their ...
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3answers
430 views

How can particles travel in a straight line?

A particle can be set off in a certain direction by giving them momentum. Momentum is a vector, so the particle heads off in a specific direction. But the wave function of the particle allows it to ...
6
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0answers
130 views

Anyons as particles?

I'm trying to understand the basics of anyons physics. I understand there is neither a Fock space they live in (because Fock is just the space of (anti-)symmetrized tensor product state, see e.g. ...
2
votes
2answers
594 views

Interpretation of de Broglie wave

Until what point can the de Broglie wave be thought as a real wave? I mean, is it made of something? What amplitude does it have? Is it a sine wave? How can it be related to the wavefunction of the ...
3
votes
2answers
496 views

Difference between electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and Electromagnetic Field?

I'm a freshly graduated electrical engineer. One course that I really struggled with was Field Theory, because it was a lovely assortment of vector calculus and things that were explained to me well ...
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2answers
4k views

De Broglie wavelength, frequency and velocity - interpretation

Two fundamental equations regarding wave-particle duality are: $$ \lambda = \frac{h}{p}, \\ \nu = E/h .$$ We talk about de Broglie wavelength, is it meaningful to talk about de Broglie frequency ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

How does the wavelength change in relativistic limit?

In the text, it reads that the momentum of a particle will change if it is moving at speed close to light speed. In the general case, the wavelength is given as $$ \lambda = \frac{h}{p} $$ and $$p ...
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4answers
404 views

Are there theories that explain wave-particle duality?

I'm confused by the famous wave-particle duality mystery: When a particle is left unobserved, it acts like a wave and can explore all classically available particle trajectories simultaneously. By ...
6
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1answer
216 views

Will a football (soccer) diffract? [duplicate]

Apparently all objects have wavelike properties, so, if we kick a football (soccer ball, if you must) through a pair of posts, does the ball in any sense diffract? If this is ridiculous then let me ...
3
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3answers
519 views

What does it mean that a wavevector is null?

I have derived geometric optics for gravitational waves and I am trying to interpret one of the results. I have \begin{equation} k_{\rho}k^{\rho}=0 \end{equation} for the wavevector. For the case ...
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4answers
308 views

Why are electrons consider waves?

I know the wave nature of electrons was evoked to explain why atoms are stable but I thought waves could be put in the same state like photons yet electrons can not exist in the same state.
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4answers
369 views

What does the wave principle of light actually represent?

Light has a dual nature, one of photons and the other of waves. But energy doesn't really travel in waves. So what do the wave represent?
2
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1answer
137 views

Is this mental picture of photon correct?

What is exactly meant by a statement like "there are about 400 photons per cubic cm in certain region"? Should I mentally picture this as 400 discrete photons enclosed in that volume, each moving at ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

how quantum-mechanical particles react in the potential?

I am reading some materials on quantum mechanics. I am a bit confusing in the chapter on wave-particle duality and following questions arise In classical mechanics, the force a particle experience is ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

The Dual Nature of Matter

I can't seem to understand the dual nature of matter completely. If electrons have a wave nature, then if two electrons were to collide, wouldn't they undergo interference and form an electron wave ...
6
votes
1answer
5k views

What is light, and how can it travel in a vacuum forever in all directions at once without a medium?

I know there are many questions that are similar (maybe identical?). I am not a physicist nor a student - I am just interested in physics and have been watching many physics channels on youtube ...
1
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4answers
925 views

wave-particle duality

I have been trying to understand "wave-particle duality" and other cases related to it. I am currently a college level student. I have few question which I am not getting answers clearly. In double ...
2
votes
2answers
9k views

Frequency of an Electron

My question is very simple. If frequency is defined as the cylces per unit time, Then what is meant by "Frequency of an Electron" ? If the rotation of electron around a nucleus is considered then, ...
4
votes
3answers
702 views

What is the experiment where subatomic particles appear to foresee the future?

I've seen a documentary, whose name I don't remember but I'm curious because it suggests that subatomic particles are able to "foresee the future". I'll try to describe it here: Some particles are ...
27
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9answers
4k views

Is the wave-particle duality a real duality?

I often hear about the wave-particle duality, and how particles exhibit properties of both particles and waves. I most recently heard this in this video. However, I wonder; is this actually a duality? ...
1
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0answers
181 views

Splitting light into colors, mathematical expression (fourier transforms)

I am trying to solve a problem that includes a function of the light hitting a certain area. My question is, how would I change a function $G(x)$ of photons hitting a certain area to include just ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

How do we know particles exist? Aren't they just waves?

In the book "A Briefer History of Time" Stephen Hawking wrote: The unpredictable, random element comes in only when we try to interpret the wave in terms of the positions and velocities of ...
4
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4answers
10k views

Can an electron be in two places at the same time?

So I've been reading a bit and watching some videos about the double slit experiment, and therefore the wave particle duality; I've also read this "implies" that a particle can be in two places at the ...
2
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2answers
533 views

Is wave–particle duality considered a valid interpretation of the behavior of photons?

There are a number of questions on this site that explain the many wave-like behaviors of photons by making reference to wave-particle duality. However, I have just finished reading Feynman's book ...