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0
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1answer
90 views

Is there a hard upper bound to the deBroglie wavelength of a particle with vanishing momentum? [duplicate]

This is probably a stupid and simple question, but does the heisenberg uncertainty principle set this upper bound? That knowledge of the momentum is limited, so it can't reach a very low value and ...
12
votes
4answers
754 views

Are the Maxwell equations a correct description of the wave character of photons?

In basic quantum mechanics courses, one describes the evolution of quantum mechanics chronologically. Interference experiments with particles showed that particles should have a wave character; on the ...
-2
votes
1answer
97 views

Is light particle of wave?

We know that Young's double slit experiment shows that light is a wave. On the other hand photoelectric effect shows that light is made up of photons. How can light be both at the same time?
0
votes
2answers
131 views

Quantum Mechanical Interpretation of Water Waves?

So I have been exploring the idea of wave-particle duality and came across and interesting idea. Could water waves, be interpreted as particles in some context? If so, how would you observe their ...
5
votes
3answers
255 views

How can particles travel in a straight line?

A particle can be set off in a certain direction by giving them momentum. Momentum is a vector, so the particle heads off in a specific direction. But the wave function of the particle allows it to ...
5
votes
0answers
86 views

Anyons as particles?

I'm trying to understand the basics of anyons physics. I understand there is neither a Fock space they live in (because Fock is just the space of (anti-)symmetrized tensor product state, see e.g. ...
2
votes
2answers
190 views

Interpretation of de Broglie wave

Until what point can the de Broglie wave be thought as a real wave? I mean, is it made of something? What amplitude does it have? Is it a sine wave? How can it be related to the wavefunction of the ...
3
votes
1answer
249 views

Difference between electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and Electromagnetic Field?

I'm a freshly graduated electrical engineer. One course that I really struggled with was Field Theory, because it was a lovely assortment of vector calculus and things that were explained to me well ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

De Broglie wavelength, frequency and velocity - interpretation

Two fundamental equations regarding wave-particle duality are: $$ \lambda = \frac{h}{p}, \\ \nu = E/h .$$ We talk about de Broglie wavelength, is it meaningful to talk about de Broglie frequency ...
3
votes
2answers
413 views

How does the wavelength change in relativistic limit?

In the text, it reads that the momentum of a particle will change if it is moving at speed close to light speed. In the general case, the wavelength is given as $$ \lambda = \frac{h}{p} $$ and $$p ...
0
votes
4answers
341 views

Are there theories that explain wave-particle duality?

I'm confused by the famous wave-particle duality mystery: When a particle is left unobserved, it acts like a wave and can explore all classically available particle trajectories simultaneously. By ...
6
votes
1answer
138 views

Will a football (soccer) diffract?

Apparently all objects have wavelike properties, so, if we kick a football (soccer ball, if you must) through a pair of posts, does the ball in any sense diffract? If this is ridiculous then let me ...
3
votes
3answers
299 views

What does it mean that a wavevector is null?

I have derived geometric optics for gravitational waves and I am trying to interpret one of the results. I have \begin{equation} k_{\rho}k^{\rho}=0 \end{equation} for the wavevector. For the case ...
0
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4answers
244 views

Why are electrons consider waves?

I know the wave nature of electrons was evoked to explain why atoms are stable but I thought waves could be put in the same state like photons yet electrons can not exist in the same state.
-1
votes
4answers
259 views

What does the wave principle of light actually represent?

Light has a dual nature, one of photons and the other of waves. But energy doesn't really travel in waves. So what do the wave represent?
1
vote
1answer
109 views

Is this mental picture of photon correct?

What is exactly meant by a statement like "there are about 400 photons per cubic cm in certain region"? Should I mentally picture this as 400 discrete photons enclosed in that volume, each moving at ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

how quantum-mechanical particles react in the potential?

I am reading some materials on quantum mechanics. I am a bit confusing in the chapter on wave-particle duality and following questions arise In classical mechanics, the force a particle experience is ...
3
votes
3answers
754 views

The Dual Nature of Matter

I can't seem to understand the dual nature of matter completely. If electrons have a wave nature, then if two electrons were to collide, wouldn't they undergo interference and form an electron wave ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

What is light, and how can it travel in a vacuum forever in all directions at once without a medium?

I know there are many questions that are similar (maybe identical?). I am not a physicist nor a student - I am just interested in physics and have been watching many physics channels on youtube ...
1
vote
4answers
543 views

wave-particle duality

I have been trying to understand "wave-particle duality" and other cases related to it. I am currently a college level student. I have few question which I am not getting answers clearly. In double ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Frequency of an Electron

My question is very simple. If frequency is defined as the cylces per unit time, Then what is meant by "Frequency of an Electron" ? If the rotation of electron around a nucleus is considered then, ...
4
votes
3answers
481 views

What is the experiment where subatomic particles appear to foresee the future?

I've seen a documentary, whose name I don't remember but I'm curious because it suggests that subatomic particles are able to "foresee the future". I'll try to describe it here: Some particles are ...
19
votes
7answers
2k views

Is the wave-particle duality a real duality?

I often hear about the wave-particle duality, and how particles exhibit properties of both particles and waves. I most recently heard this in this video. However, I wonder; is this actually a duality? ...
1
vote
0answers
174 views

Splitting light into colors, mathematical expression (fourier transforms)

I am trying to solve a problem that includes a function of the light hitting a certain area. My question is, how would I change a function $G(x)$ of photons hitting a certain area to include just ...
1
vote
3answers
553 views

How do we know particles exist? Aren't they just waves?

In the book "A Briefer History of Time" Stephen Hawking wrote: The unpredictable, random element comes in only when we try to interpret the wave in terms of the positions and velocities of ...
2
votes
4answers
5k views

Can an electron be in two places at the same time?

So I've been reading a bit and watching some videos about the double slit experiment, and therefore the wave particle duality; I've also read this "implies" that a particle can be in two places at the ...
2
votes
2answers
321 views

Is wave–particle duality considered a valid interpretation of the behavior of photons?

There are a number of questions on this site that explain the many wave-like behaviors of photons by making reference to wave-particle duality. However, I have just finished reading Feynman's book ...
3
votes
2answers
342 views

Particles vs Waves

As I remember long ago, in my physics classes, I always had a great trouble understanding the concept of waves. Our professor used to explain, as if everything in this world is made up of waves. ...
2
votes
5answers
252 views

Wave/particle duality

Apologies if this has been asked before (I did check and I believe it wasn't). I have a question about the particle/wave duality of photons (or other particles). Depending on what and how we measure ...
5
votes
4answers
835 views

What does a de Broglie wave look like?

What does a de Broglie wave look like? Are de Broglie waves transverse or longitudinal? Can they be polarized? What about the de Broglie wave of a ground state neutral spin-zero Helium 4 atom? ...
4
votes
2answers
656 views

Matter waves - DeBroglie's relations

I am currently studying from Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers by Taylor et al. They derive the DeBroglie relation $p=h/\lambda$ from setting mass $m=0$ in the energy-momentum relation ...
4
votes
4answers
787 views

What does it mean (how is it visualized) for a particle to act as a wave?

I have no background in physics. This isn't for homework, just for interest. In quantum physics, it's described that a particle can act as both a particle and a wave. Quoted from HowStuffWorks ...
2
votes
1answer
140 views

Quantum mechanics and Couder experiments

Couder experiments ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=W9yWv5dqSKk and https://hekla.ipgp.fr/IMG/pdf/Couder-Fort_PRL_2006.pdf), published in 2006, state that by dropping ...
6
votes
7answers
4k views

Why does observation collapse the wave function?

In one of the first lectures on QM we are always taught about Young's experiment and how particles behave either as waves or as particles depending on whether or not they are being observed. I want to ...
11
votes
4answers
1k views

Does the uncertainty principle apply to photons?

Wikipedia claims the following: More generally, the normal concept of a Schrödinger probability wave function cannot be applied to photons. Being massless, they cannot be localized without being ...
3
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1answer
124 views

Determining the spin of wavefunction

We all know that by uncertainty principle, location of a wave-particle is perfectly determined when uncertainty of momentum becomes infinite. (I also heard that in reality, it is almost impossible to ...
1
vote
1answer
430 views

Photons and uncertainty principle

Let's assume we have a perfect single-photon source: a device emitting exactly one photon at a time, with defined energy and direction. Let's shoot a photon: we know exactly the position of the photon ...
8
votes
4answers
770 views

$\lambda=\frac{2h}{p}$?

I am studying quantum physics and there is something I don't understand: I know that for any particle $E=hf$ (Einstein relation) and $v=\lambda f$ ($v$ is the speed of the particle). I also know that ...
1
vote
1answer
242 views

electrons in an atom and uncertainty principle

Electrons in an atom have quantized energy quantity. Can uncertainty principle be applied in this case, then? How does this work? As energy is fixed, this seems to disobey $\Delta E \Delta t \geq ...
0
votes
1answer
416 views

Momentum in quantum mechanics

In quantum mechanics, we can have some superposition of matter waves that have different wavelengths. If then, can't momentum of a particle change every time measurement takes place? Or should I ...
3
votes
1answer
419 views

wavefunction collapse and uncertainty principle

We all know that wavefunction collapse when it is observed. Uncertainty principle states that $\sigma_x \sigma_p \geq \frac {\hbar}{2}$. When wavefunction collapse, doesn't $\sigma_x$ become $0$?, as ...
2
votes
5answers
283 views

wave superposition of electrons and quarks

Is quantum wave superposition of electrons and quarks possible? If not, can different types of elementary particles be mixed in wave superposition?
5
votes
5answers
819 views

What do we actually mean when we say that matter is a wave?

What do we actually mean when we say that matter is a wave? What does the wavelength of this matter wave indicate? The idea of a particle behaving like a wave is kinda incomprehensible to me. ...
1
vote
1answer
116 views

Matter wave of multiple particles of different types

I am slightly getting confused on the following issue: When performing double-slit experiment of electrons, a screen allows the matter waves to be detected as particles. And as we all know that ...
2
votes
1answer
138 views

Deducing from the double slit experiment that electrons mostly behave like particles

I saw this video of a lecture by Feynman where he said that electrons behave like particles when there is a photon source to detect which slit they pass through. Does this imply that electrons mostly ...
3
votes
2answers
208 views

Which equation tells you the minimum energy of a wave needed to see a small particle?

I have a problem that asks for the minimum energy of a wave that we will use to see a particle of size $.1\text{ nm}$. I understand that I can not see a $.1\text{ nm}$ particle with any wave length ...
6
votes
2answers
921 views

How can a Photon have a “frequency”?

I picture light ray as a composition of photons with an energy equal to the frequency of the light ray according to $E=hf$. Is this the good way to picture this? Although I can solve elementary ...
1
vote
2answers
318 views

matter wave and wave function

Is there any mathematical relationship between matter wave (or de Broglie wave) and wave function? Also, does each type of particle (e.g. photon, electron, positron etc.) have its own unique wave ...
4
votes
4answers
237 views

Slit screen and wave-particle duality

In a double-slit experiment, interference patterns are shown when light passes through the slits and illuminate the screen. So the question is, if one shoots a single photon, does the screen show ...
1
vote
4answers
703 views

Questions on wave-particle duality

Wave-particle duality states that a particle has both wave properties and particle properties when one is not observing it. 1) What is an observer? Need it be anything living or can other particles ...