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1answer
7 views

Coincidences in diffractograms through thin metal foils

Diffraction through thin foils has always been considered evidence for the wave behavior of the incident particles, $X$-photons at first, then electrons, protons, neutrons, $α$-particles, etc. After ...
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0answers
115 views

Have they really photographed light behaving both as a particle and a wave?

I just came across this article where they are claiming that they have photographed light behaving both as a wave and a particle! The paper has been published in Nature and I read the abstract which ...
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2answers
72 views

Understanding the interpretation of wave-particle duality by W.L.Bragg

W.L.Bragg, the pioneer in x-ray diffraction, gave this lucid but vivid interpretation:"The dividing line between the wave & particle nature of matter & radiation is the moment now. As this ...
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0answers
16 views

Idea About Combining the Light Models [closed]

This is probably going to sound very silly, but I learned that light has three different models: particle, wave and ray. So why can't it be that light is really a stream of particles that are moving ...
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0answers
51 views

Quantum Physics..so what do you think? [duplicate]

We have de Broglie's equation for the wavelength of matter waves.well...we know that we neglect it in classical mechanics.Consider a space rocket or something that 's moving really fast.In a space ...
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2answers
76 views

Relation between Wave equation of light and photon wave function?

Suppose in our double slit experimental setup with the usual notations $d,D$, we have a beam of light of known frequency $(\nu)$ and wavelength $(\lambda)$ - so we can describe it as $$ξ_0 = ...
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3answers
47 views

What happens when one of the double slits are closed?

I was reading "50 quantum physics ideas you really need to know" (by Joanne Baker) and came across an ambiguous paragraph. The topic: Wave-particle duality. It describes a photon that passes through ...
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1answer
39 views

Can someone reconcile the Boltzmann transport equation with the Maxwell equations for photons/light?

Having taking courses in both physics and nuclear engineering, I've noticed that the two fields tend to describe photons/light in two different settings. In nuclear engineering, the radiative ...
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2answers
94 views

Explain the notion of light/electromagnetic waves/photons to a non-physicist

A non-physicist asked me about special relativity. My explanations naturally were based on gedankenexperiments involving light. This forced the question: "What is light? It is particles, isn't? Or is ...
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1answer
23 views

Duality in Electromagnetic Spectrum

Is visible light the only portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that exhibits particle/wave duality? If so, how/why do other frequencies (i.e. radio) behave as waves?
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2answers
2k views

What is a wave? What is a particle?

I am reading a David Bohm book on quantum theory. He says the idea that light is both a particle and a wave is incompatible: (1) we know light has particle-like properties through the photoelectric ...
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4answers
102 views

Interpretation of Orbital Magnetic Moment

The wavefunctions for atomic orbitals have always been described to me one of two ways: As a "smeared out" electron standing wave with integer number circumference of de Broglie wavelengths As a ...
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3answers
461 views

Wave/particle-duality as result of taking different limits of a QFT

There is an account on dualities in quantum field theories and string theories by Polchinski from last week http://arxiv.org/abs/1412.5704 At the end of page 4, he writes the wave/particle ...
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2answers
90 views

How can the electron be a wave? [duplicate]

I read about Rutherford's failed attempt to describe the atomic model. Then I read about Bohr's model and his postulates. Ok, that was fine. But then I read in my book a statement that shocked me: ...
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2answers
301 views

Wave function in quantum mechanics

I was wondering about something while studying quantum mechanics. If the wave function collapses when measuring a particle and assumes a single position, how do we know that it was a wave in the first ...
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4answers
350 views

What does observation mean in two-slit electron diffraction experiment? [duplicate]

My question is clear, that I ask: What do we mean by "observation" in 2-slit experiment for electrons (or any other wave-particle)? You know, we say that :"if we observe the electron, it shows a ...
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2answers
157 views

Wave particle duality or complementarity?

First off I have found several different definitions of duality and complementarity, so if anyone has a clear idea on what it meant with these terms please do share. Now, what I mean is the ...
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2answers
123 views

What's the connection between the spin of the photon and the polarisation of light?

In view of wave-particle duality, the spin of the photon must have a counterpart in the wave picture: is this polarisation?
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3answers
100 views

Is the kinetic energy of an electron always $1.6 \cdot 10^{-19}~\text{J}$?

I was doing the following problem. For $d$. They bizarrely added an extra step. They calculated the momentum of the electron to find the De Broglie wavelength using the kinetic energy relationship. ...
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0answers
47 views

Wave-Particle Duality in the Confinement of an Electron in a Box [closed]

According to the wave particle duality, one can say that an electron is both a wave and a particle. If we confine it in a box, it can only form standing waves at particular wavelengths, which leads ...
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2answers
52 views

A Quantum Telephone [duplicate]

You are an astronaut, traveling through space, but you ran out of fuel and need to get a hold of Houston immediately. How do you do it? You previously gave Houston one of two quantum particles that ...
1
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1answer
38 views

Does Red shift affect electron waves? [duplicate]

According to the De-Broglie Wave Hypothesis an electron can be considered to be a wave. Red Shift occurs due to the expansion of space(Cosmological red shift), which must expand even on the scale of ...
3
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4answers
947 views

Must Matter Particles Have A Hard Edge?

It's my understanding that electrons are particles, and it's also my understanding that their location while orbiting an atom cannot be determined precisely and must be determined by statistics and ...
2
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1answer
72 views

References on De Broglie-Bohm pilot wave theory

Are there any good books related to the not much popular De Broglie-Bohm pilot wave theory and its application in hydrodynamics, walking droplets concepts?
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3answers
2k views

What do we see while watching light? Waves or particles?

I'm trying to understand quantum physics. I'm pretty familiar with it but I can't decide what counts as observing to cause particle behave (at least when it's about lights). So the question is what do ...
3
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3answers
134 views

A misunderstanding regarding infinite square well

Here is a picture of the energy states of infinite potential well. We can see That the first level have a half wavelength which fittes with a full wave of the second level. $$\frac{ \lambda _{1} ...
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3answers
96 views

Isn't all light polarised?

I apologize if my question does not make sense.(I'm teaching myself microscopy.) So reading Fundamentals of Light Microscopy and electronic imaging by Douglas&Murphy, at one point the author ...
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5answers
175 views

What exactly are light waves?

We know a sound wave is a disturbance that moves through a medium when particles of the medium set neighboring particles in motion. And using the pressure variations we can plot a pressure/time graph ...
1
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1answer
85 views

Difficulties in understanding basic energy equation in quantum mechanics [duplicate]

While reading a text book about basics of Quantum Mechanics, I came across a situation in which it is said that $E=\hbar\omega$ and also $E = \frac12mv^2=p^2/2m$ where $h$ Planck's constant ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Does the equation for a wave passing through two slits apply for particles as waves?

The standard equation for a wave travelling through a double-slit apparatus is $w=\dfrac{z\lambda}{d}$, where $w$ is the fringe spacing at the detector screen on the other side of the slits, $z$ is ...
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2answers
204 views

Why is Planck's constant the same for all particles?

This question came to me while reading Where does de Broglie wavelength $\lambda=h/p$ for massive particles come from? This question has a nice answer that explains that wave number has be ...
4
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2answers
145 views

Where does de Broglie wavelength $\lambda=h/p$ for massive particles come from?

I'm curious where the de Broglie relation $p=\frac{h}{\lambda}$ comes from? I know that for light (which has no rest mass), the following is true: $E=pc$ and $E=hf$ so, $$pc=hf \Rightarrow ...
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1answer
40 views

Why part of debroglie wave is negative?

I mean de Broglie wave for a particle represents the probability of the particle existing at a point, then, how can it be negative as well as positive?
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3answers
604 views

What does the Schrodinger Equation really mean?

I understand that the Schrodinger equation is actually a principle that cannot be proven. But can someone give a plausible foundation for it and give it some physical meaning/interpretation. I guess ...
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5answers
160 views

Are double-slit patterns really due to wave-like interference?

According to various sources on the web, it seems like the general concensus is that there isn't actually any wave-particle duality with quantum particles. For example, this article implies that ...
1
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1answer
85 views

Is the photon first a wave, then a particle? [duplicate]

When the 'photon' is emitted, it would reason that the result of the energy fluctuation that creates 'it' rather is created as an energy wave, which when measured by us or a surface, it 'becomes' as a ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Particles acting like waves [duplicate]

Wave–particle duality is kinda bothering me... I read that electrons can act like waves, but I know that electrons are actually particles. The theory says that if you have not observed the particle ...
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2answers
47 views

Can an experiment be designed to distinguish between actual wave interference and probability or pilot wave results?

I am a physics groupie, so please excuse me if this question is stupid, but I am trying to better understand the particle/wave duality in quantum physics. It would seem that, in the double slit ...
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4answers
138 views

Photons to Represent a Wave

I fear that I have a fundamental misconception about the "wave particle duality" of light, but in a related question, the answerer said, in some sense, that a light wave propagates until it hits ...
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2answers
111 views

Particles Associated With Gravitational Waves

I've been reading about linearized GR and the study of gravitational waves, and an odd thought popped into my head. According to wave-particle duality (admittedly, usually used in quantum mechanics!), ...
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3answers
274 views

The Gluon - Does It Exhibit Wave Properties?

Do Gluons have frequencies and wavelengths? I assume that they do, but have been unable to find anything on point in SE or Wikipedia. Just beginning to study university-level physics here.
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3answers
443 views

Light has a wave particle duality, how do we know?

I've been told my whole life that light is either a wave or a particle. When it's traveling through space, it's a wave. When it hits a wall, or a photo-sensitive chemical strip or something similar, ...
4
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4answers
158 views

What exactly is meant by “observed” when talking about the wave-particle duality?

When talking about the wave-particle duality, teachers and books say that when you send a single photon through a slit, it makes a wave pattern. But if you send that particle through the slit and "you ...
0
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1answer
66 views

Will an electron gun fire behind it?

If an electron travels as a wave, can it therefore not be aimed with any precision? If you fire an electron gun, can't you aim it at a particular slit? If the electron travels as a wave, will an ...
2
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1answer
133 views

If light is an electric and (magnetic field), how can it be absorbed?

I was wondering how light or any electromagnetic radiation can be "absorbed" if it consists of electric and magnetic fields. For example if there is a charge at point A, and the light reaches point ...
0
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0answers
67 views

Mathematical derivation of interference pattern for electrons?

One of the most famous experiments in quantum mechanics in the context of wave-particle duality is certainly passing a beam of electrons through two slits, which results in an interference pattern ...
12
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2answers
351 views

Do particles behave like electromagnetic waves?

From double-slit experiments we know particles have wave-like behavior: they statistically form an interference pattern. My question is: Is this wave-like behavior similar to the photons' behavior? ...
2
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2answers
123 views

Logic of the 'imaginary wave function collapse' argument in Double Slit experiment

My question is in regards to the stance that the 'wave function collapse' is not an actual physical occurrence. That is, you are not, by observation, changing the particles position from a wave to a ...
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1answer
61 views

Trying to measure travel time of photons in a double slit experiment

So far I'm only tasting the quantum mechanics. Haven't gone very deep into the mathematics of it yet. I read about the double slit experiment, and the weird consequences of it: if you put a detector ...
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2answers
49 views

Dual particle-wave behavior

If electrons and photons, and possibly more particles, exhibit dual character, why don't physicists create a new classification for them? Why describe them as both waves and particles. Why not rather ...