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2
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0answers
32 views

Wave/particle-duality as result of taking different limits of a QFT

There is an account on dualities in quantum field theories and string theories by Polchinski from last week http://arxiv.org/abs/1412.5704 At the end of page 4, he writes the wave/particle ...
0
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2answers
79 views

How can the electron be a wave? [duplicate]

I read about Rutherford's failed attempt to describe the atomic model. Then I read about Bohr's model and his postulates. Ok, that was fine. But then I read in my book a statement that shocked me: ...
5
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2answers
242 views

Wave function in quantum mechanics

I was wondering about something while studying quantum mechanics. If the wave function collapses when measuring a particle and assumes a single position, how do we know that it was a wave in the first ...
-1
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0answers
49 views

Double slit experiment setup which resolves dualism

Suppose we have the following setup of double-slit experiment: A point source of coherent photons emits them so that they fall onto a non-transparent panel D ...
4
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4answers
198 views

What does observation mean in two-slit electron diffraction experiment? [duplicate]

My question is clear, that I ask: What do we mean by "observation" in 2-slit experiment for electrons (or any other wave-particle)? You know, we say that :"if we observe the electron, it shows a ...
2
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2answers
132 views

Wave particle duality or complementarity?

First off I have found several different definitions of duality and complementarity, so if anyone has a clear idea on what it meant with these terms please do share. Now, what I mean is the ...
4
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2answers
110 views

What's the connection between the spin of the photon and the polarisation of light?

In view of wave-particle duality, the spin of the photon must have a counterpart in the wave picture: is this polarisation?
0
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3answers
90 views

Is the kinetic energy of an electron always $1.6 \cdot 10^{-19}~\text{J}$?

I was doing the following problem. For $d$. They bizarrely added an extra step. They calculated the momentum of the electron to find the De Broglie wavelength using the kinetic energy relationship. ...
1
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0answers
46 views

Wave-Particle Duality in the Confinement of an Electron in a Box [closed]

According to the wave particle duality, one can say that an electron is both a wave and a particle. If we confine it in a box, it can only form standing waves at particular wavelengths, which leads ...
1
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1answer
30 views

Does Red shift affect electron waves? [duplicate]

According to the De-Broglie Wave Hypothesis an electron can be considered to be a wave. Red Shift occurs due to the expansion of space(Cosmological red shift), which must expand even on the scale of ...
3
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4answers
920 views

Must Matter Particles Have A Hard Edge?

It's my understanding that electrons are particles, and it's also my understanding that their location while orbiting an atom cannot be determined precisely and must be determined by statistics and ...
2
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0answers
47 views

References on De Broglie-Bohm pilot wave theory

Are there any good books related to the not much popular De Broglie-Bohm pilot wave theory and its application in hydrodynamics, walking droplets concepts?
29
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3answers
2k views

What do we see while watching light? Waves or particles?

I'm trying to understand quantum physics. I'm pretty familiar with it but I can't decide what counts as observing to cause particle behave (at least when it's about lights). So the question is what do ...
3
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3answers
111 views

A misunderstanding regarding infinite square well

Here is a picture of the energy states of infinite potential well. We can see That the first level have a half wavelength which fittes with a full wave of the second level. $$\frac{ \lambda _{1} ...
1
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3answers
88 views

Isn't all light polarised?

I apologize if my question does not make sense.(I'm teaching myself microscopy.) So reading Fundamentals of Light Microscopy and electronic imaging by Douglas&Murphy, at one point the author ...
5
votes
5answers
137 views

What exactly are light waves?

We know a sound wave is a disturbance that moves through a medium when particles of the medium set neighboring particles in motion. And using the pressure variations we can plot a pressure/time graph ...
1
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1answer
78 views

Difficulties in understanding basic energy equation in quantum mechanics [duplicate]

While reading a text book about basics of Quantum Mechanics, I came across a situation in which it is said that $E=\hbar\omega$ and also $E = \frac12mv^2=p^2/2m$ where $h$ Planck's constant ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Does the equation for a wave passing through two slits apply for particles as waves?

The standard equation for a wave travelling through a double-slit apparatus is $w=\dfrac{z\lambda}{d}$, where $w$ is the fringe spacing at the detector screen on the other side of the slits, $z$ is ...
0
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0answers
84 views

What should be the de Broglie's equation?

I have learnt that the equation for de Broglie's wavelength is $$\lambda =h/p$$ where $h$ is Planck's constant, and $p$ is the momentum of the particle. We can derive it from equating Einstein's ...
6
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2answers
201 views

Why is Planck's constant the same for all particles?

This question came to me while reading Where does de Broglie wavelength $\lambda=h/p$ for massive particles come from? This question has a nice answer that explains that wave number has be ...
4
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2answers
127 views

Where does de Broglie wavelength $\lambda=h/p$ for massive particles come from?

I'm curious where the de Broglie relation $p=\frac{h}{\lambda}$ comes from? I know that for light (which has no rest mass), the following is true: $E=pc$ and $E=hf$ so, $$pc=hf \Rightarrow ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Why part of debroglie wave is negative?

I mean de Broglie wave for a particle represents the probability of the particle existing at a point, then, how can it be negative as well as positive?
5
votes
3answers
465 views

What does the Schrodinger Equation really mean?

I understand that the Schrodinger equation is actually a principle that cannot be proven. But can someone give a plausible foundation for it and give it some physical meaning/interpretation. I guess ...
1
vote
5answers
134 views

Are double-slit patterns really due to wave-like interference?

According to various sources on the web, it seems like the general concensus is that there isn't actually any wave-particle duality with quantum particles. For example, this article implies that ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Is the photon first a wave, then a particle? [duplicate]

When the 'photon' is emitted, it would reason that the result of the energy fluctuation that creates 'it' rather is created as an energy wave, which when measured by us or a surface, it 'becomes' as a ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Particles acting like waves [duplicate]

Wave–particle duality is kinda bothering me... I read that electrons can act like waves, but I know that electrons are actually particles. The theory says that if you have not observed the particle ...
0
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2answers
41 views

Can an experiment be designed to distinguish between actual wave interference and probability or pilot wave results?

I am a physics groupie, so please excuse me if this question is stupid, but I am trying to better understand the particle/wave duality in quantum physics. It would seem that, in the double slit ...
2
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4answers
126 views

Photons to Represent a Wave

I fear that I have a fundamental misconception about the "wave particle duality" of light, but in a related question, the answerer said, in some sense, that a light wave propagates until it hits ...
0
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2answers
108 views

Particles Associated With Gravitational Waves

I've been reading about linearized GR and the study of gravitational waves, and an odd thought popped into my head. According to wave-particle duality (admittedly, usually used in quantum mechanics!), ...
3
votes
3answers
263 views

The Gluon - Does It Exhibit Wave Properties?

Do Gluons have frequencies and wavelengths? I assume that they do, but have been unable to find anything on point in SE or Wikipedia. Just beginning to study university-level physics here.
3
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3answers
350 views

Light has a wave particle duality, how do we know?

I've been told my whole life that light is either a wave or a particle. When it's traveling through space, it's a wave. When it hits a wall, or a photo-sensitive chemical strip or something similar, ...
3
votes
4answers
140 views

What exactly is meant by “observed” when talking about the wave-particle duality?

When talking about the wave-particle duality, teachers and books say that when you send a single photon through a slit, it makes a wave pattern. But if you send that particle through the slit and "you ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Will an electron gun fire behind it?

If an electron travels as a wave, can it therefore not be aimed with any precision? If you fire an electron gun, can't you aim it at a particular slit? If the electron travels as a wave, will an ...
2
votes
1answer
118 views

If light is an electric and (magnetic field), how can it be absorbed?

I was wondering how light or any electromagnetic radiation can be "absorbed" if it consists of electric and magnetic fields. For example if there is a charge at point A, and the light reaches point ...
0
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0answers
58 views

Mathematical derivation of interference pattern for electrons?

One of the most famous experiments in quantum mechanics in the context of wave-particle duality is certainly passing a beam of electrons through two slits, which results in an interference pattern ...
11
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2answers
276 views

Do particles behave like electromagnetic waves?

From double-slit experiments we know particles have wave-like behavior: they statistically form an interference pattern. My question is: Is this wave-like behavior similar to the photons' behavior? ...
2
votes
2answers
110 views

Logic of the 'imaginary wave function collapse' argument in Double Slit experiment

My question is in regards to the stance that the 'wave function collapse' is not an actual physical occurrence. That is, you are not, by observation, changing the particles position from a wave to a ...
0
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1answer
56 views

Trying to measure travel time of photons in a double slit experiment

So far I'm only tasting the quantum mechanics. Haven't gone very deep into the mathematics of it yet. I read about the double slit experiment, and the weird consequences of it: if you put a detector ...
0
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2answers
45 views

Dual particle-wave behavior

If electrons and photons, and possibly more particles, exhibit dual character, why don't physicists create a new classification for them? Why describe them as both waves and particles. Why not rather ...
2
votes
1answer
432 views

Why doesn't De Broglie's wave equation work for photons?

Well, as I am learning about quantum physics, one of the first topics I came across was De Broglie's wave equation. $$\frac{h}{mc} = \lambda$$ As is obvious, it relates the wavelength to the mass of ...
2
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2answers
45 views

What is being deprived when a photon is being watched in double slit experiment?

How are photons being watched in the double slit experiment? What exactly does being observed mean, as it is obviously changes the state of the photon somehow - it must be depriving the photon of ...
17
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1answer
951 views

Is the Uncertainty Principle valid for information about the past?

My layman understanding of the Uncertainty Principle is that you can't determine the both the position and momentum of a particle at the same point in time, because measuring one variable changes the ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

Finding speed of light by $c=f\lambda$?

When considering EM radiation as waves it is said that it is electric and magnetic fields that oscillate with time. Therefore $f$ is not frequency of distance but of electromagnetic fields. I have ...
2
votes
1answer
151 views

Wave Packet in Curved Spacetime

It is known that the classical equation of motion for a scalar field wave packet on a curved spacetime background gives the geodesic trajectory (the e.o.m. is $(\nabla_\mu \nabla^\mu + m^2) \Phi=0$). ...
1
vote
2answers
61 views

Do photons in interferometer violate the law of conservation of mass?

I mean Mach-Zehnder Interferometer, where light split into two shortest paths. Is light after splitting wave or particle? Is it a particle? How could one photon change to two? If the wave, does the ...
5
votes
2answers
124 views

A modified version of the famous double-slit experiment

AFAIK, all the double slit experiments that were performed uses a light source (or electron source...) that emits photons at a "perpendicular" angle as this image shows: (will call it experiment 1) ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Crystal diffraction for waves vs particles

I thought that I understand the "Bragg's Law" understanding of crystal diffraction, but recently I read something that made me confused. I understand that if the planes in the crystal have ...
1
vote
2answers
70 views

Does a light wave that has been cancelled by another light wave continue traveling forward?

I imagine that if a light wave is cancelled out by another light wave, it would still continue to exist as a photon that is traveling at the speed of light--only without a wavelength. Would it behave ...
3
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3answers
84 views

Which side of wave-particle duality to choose in a given situation

How does one know whether, in treating a certain problem, one should consider particles as waves or as point-like objects? Are there certain guidelines regarding this?
1
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0answers
39 views

Subnuclear physics vs wave function

This question is more a philosophical question than a physics one. When we appreciate particle physics we study that in order to explain some experimental results we have to introduce a new particle ...