Voltage is the unit of measurement for electronic potential, from one point location to another.

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What is the difference between electric potential, voltage and electromotive force?

This is a confused part ever since I started learning electricity. What is the difference between voltage and electromotive force (emf)? Both of them have the same SI unit, right? I would appreciate ...
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11answers
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I don't understand what we really mean by voltage drop

This post is my best effort to seek assistance on a topic which is quite vague to me, so that I am struggling to formulate my questions. I hope that someone will be able to figure out what it is I'm ...
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votes
5answers
709 views

Difference between ways of transmitting power

There are two ways to transmit the same amount of power, 1 amp at 1 million volts or 1 million amps at 1 volt. Conceptually what is the difference? How can I think about it conceptually? I would ...
6
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2answers
803 views

Does the photoelectric effect obey Ohm's law?

So, I've been reading about the photoelectric effect for my modern physics class, and I was confused about how Ohm's law works in relation to it. Say we have a photoelectric apparatus that simply ...
6
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3answers
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Why do birds, sitting on electric wires, not get shocked?

If we would touch electric wires, we would get a shock, even if we are not touching ground (so that no connection is complete form wire to ground through us). I always see that birds sit on electric ...
6
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2answers
1k views

How electric currents can flow between 2 points at the same potential?

According to Ohm's law, if there is a potential difference, $V$, across a resistor then there is a current, $I$, flowing through it. Since we assume that points along the connecting wire are at the ...
6
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2answers
815 views

Voltage and current of positive lightning

For a physics issues investigation I chose to investigate what effects lightning could have on an aeroplane while in flight if it was struck and then go on to discuss some possible implications of ...
5
votes
4answers
3k views

Why is electric potential scalar?

I can't conceptually visualize why it would be so. Say you have two point charges of equal charge and a point right in the middle of them. The potential of that charge, mathematically, is proportional ...
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6answers
10k views

Difference between current and voltage sources

I am confused about the current and voltage. My intuitive example would be that of a pipe of say water. The diameter of the pipe determines the amount of water flowing per second but the pressure is ...
5
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3answers
34k views

Why do we use Root Mean Square (RMS) values when talking about AC voltage

What makes it a good idea to use RMS rather than peak values of current and voltage when we talk about or compute with AC signals.
5
votes
1answer
545 views

why sometimes touching old flickering tube lights starts them properly

In my old house there are two old tube lights. Some times they don't start properly, (specially at evening time, may be it is because of low voltage), they starts flickering i.e. on and off ...
4
votes
4answers
740 views

Are square wave really square or are they always relative approximations using harmonics

I'm studying the properties of waves through different mediums, and got hung up on this. Is a square wave always a sum of harmonics or can we produce a square wave by quickly changing voltage? Is ...
4
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5answers
775 views

Why doesn't an electron accelerate in a circuit?

Why don't electrons accelerate when a voltage is applied between two points in in a circuit? All the textbooks I've referred conveyed the meaning that when an electron traveled from negative potential ...
4
votes
2answers
115 views

What is happening to the electrons, and E & H fields, in an antenna with a standing wave inside?

Diagrams like the one shown below are often shown to explain antenna theory, but I have always had problem with the concept of voltage being a wave, and because of this the diagrams never make any ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

How can you have a negative voltage?

How can you have a negative voltage? I don't really understand the concept of negative voltage, how can it exist?
4
votes
1answer
130 views

Loopless voltage measurement

I think we are all very well familiarized with the classical voltmeter. Classical voltmeter has two conducting wires that bring two potentials into the box. In the box we have well controlled ...
4
votes
1answer
247 views

What is the mathematics behind artificially generated plasmas via electric fields?

The ionization degree of a plasma is given by the Saha equation, which depends on the temperature and the particle specific ionization energy. In thermal equilibrium, the relation between ionization ...
4
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2answers
177 views

Why isn't there a potential difference across a disconnected diode?

I know this question sounds silly, as if there was a potential difference a current would be created when the terminals are connected together and this would mean energy has come from somewhere. The ...
4
votes
2answers
386 views

Measuring voltage drop from induced current

I'm having trouble connecting voltage drops and induced current. Imagine you have a triangular loop make up off three resistors. You place this loop in a constantly changing magnetic field. This ...
3
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1answer
41 views

What maintains constant voltage in a battery?

I know there's lots of questions that address similar situations, (Batteries connected in Parallel, Batteries and fields?, Naive Question About Batteries, and the oft-viewed I don't understand ...
3
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2answers
194 views

Thought experiment with entangled electrons

Suppose we start out by having two entangled electrons. We separate them by some distance and we put one electron inside a thin loop of wire connected to an extremely sensitive voltage measuring ...
3
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1answer
228 views

Lifetime of battery

If I directly connect two terminals of 3V battery (negative to positive) using copper wire, would it lose all its charge faster compared to another 3V battery that is used to lighten a 1.5V bulb?
3
votes
1answer
3k views

When does voltage drop occur?

Why or when does it occur in a circuit? What does it imply when you speak of a voltage drop across a resistor? (Obviously, it probably means that the current's voltage before the resistor is higher ...
3
votes
3answers
173 views

If the current is increased, is there more charge flowing or is it moving quicker?

Problem Current is the amount of charge that is flowing through a component per unit of time. For a given voltage, Ohm's law tells us that if we increase the resistance, then the current must ...
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1answer
738 views

Sign conventions for voltage drop and gain in circuit

In Sears and Zemansky's University Physics book and in many other books in English they define the following sign conventions (used for Kirchhoff loop rule for example): While in many other books ...
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1answer
2k views

What is the role of battery across a Parallel plate capacitor having equal charge?

Each plate of a parallel plate capacitor has a charge $q$ on it. The capacitor is now connected to a battery. Now, which of the following options are correct? a) The facing surfaces of the ...
3
votes
3answers
12k views

Using A.C or D.C to create an electromagnet

Does it matter if I use A.C or D.C as a source to create an electromagnet? Or Does it depend on the voltage of current? For example: I have a coil which has about 50 turns. If I use same amount of ...
3
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1answer
653 views

Calculating the electric relative permittivity of fluid or medium?

I'm unsure of how to calculate the permittivity of a fluid. Permittivity differs from one fluid to another: $$\varepsilon=\varepsilon_r\varepsilon_0$$ Since it is an electrical property combined ...
3
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2answers
408 views

Electrostatic notion of voltage as it applies to circuits

I have a question that's been bothering me about electric fields, voltage, and circuit analysis. Initially, I came to understand voltage as it was taught in the context of electrostatics - through ...
3
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1answer
519 views

Neon lamp: minimal breakdown voltage

I am looking at this formula from wiki for breakdown voltage in gas discharge lamps, and I see its linear by length (d) (oops, I see it's divided by $ln$) $$\frac{Bpd}{\mathrm{ln}\ Apd-\mathrm{ln}\ ...
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0answers
100 views

What is the voltage difference between the Moon and the Earth?

The Moon and Earth are approximately spherical conductive balls and the Earth has a self-capacitance of around 710uF. Is there ever a significant potential difference in the Earth-Moon system? Is ...
3
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0answers
101 views

Could anyone help explain this current voltage graph for an LED in liquid nitrogen?

I've been doing my coursework investigating LEDs at various temperatures and I've come across an interesting phenomenon which nobody I've asked has been able to explain thoroughly - wheras at room ...
2
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1answer
93 views

Why isn't this working? [closed]

I just broke a 120mm computer fan in name of science and now I'm pissed; can anyone explain why this doesn't work? : The battery should create a potential difference across the motor, causing the ...
2
votes
6answers
2k views

Is voltage electric potential or electric potential difference?

On Wikipedia, voltage is defined to be the electric potential difference. However, I am still not certain as to whether voltage is the electric potential ($PE/q$) or electric potential change ...
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3answers
161 views

Why are high voltage lines “high voltage?”

If I have two spheres of the same size and one sphere has a small amount of charge compared to the other that has a lot more charge, then clearly the sphere with the larger charge has a larger voltage ...
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3answers
7k views

Finding current using EMF & internal resistance

What exactly is the difference between internal resistance and resistance? This came up in the context of a homework problem I have been given: The circuit shown in the figure contains two ...
2
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2answers
1k views

What is the potential difference between point X and point Y?

Here is the problem: In the above figure I want help on finding the potential difference between X and Y. It is getting quite confusing due to the battery in the middle. I found the current in both ...
2
votes
3answers
100 views

Calculating the Potential from the E-Field

I find that often times I'll be tripped up by questioning whether or not I can do something mathematically, and be unable to come up with a satisfying answer. This is, unfortunately, one of those ...
2
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4answers
2k views

Potential Difference Between Capacitors in Series

I am struggling to find an answer to this, hopefully relatively simple, question. I had a search on stackexchange but couldn't find anything helpful. We are learning about capacitors in Physics and I ...
2
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1answer
49 views

Question about linacs

Why are the electrodes of a linac connected to an alternating voltage? Within an electrode the electron moves with a constant speed, and once it is outside of the electrode it accelerates uniformly, ...
2
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6answers
14k views

What causes an electric shock - Current or Voltage?

Though voltage and current are two interdependent physical quantity, I would like to know what gives more "shock" to a person - Voltage or Current? In simple words, will it cause more "electric - ...
2
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2answers
739 views

is the voltage drop of a battery that is being short circuited the same as the battery's advertised voltige

So I know this is a pretty fundamental question, but I'll ask it any way. lets say you have a 12V battery, and the positive is connected to the negative directly by a wire with negligible ...
2
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1answer
83 views

How dangerous is a parallel plate capacitor which is used in physics demo experiments?

How dangerous may it be when experimenting with a parallel plate capacitor typically used in physics demonstration experiments? Take for example this one (that's what I use): ...
2
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2answers
427 views

Why does vaccum have a nonzero characteristic impedance towards electromagnetic radiation

OK, so the characteristic impedance is calculated "as square root of the ratio of the permeability of free space (µ o ) in henrys per meter ( H/m ) to the permittivity of free space ( o ) in farads ...
2
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2answers
356 views

How to find $\tau$ in this circuit?

1) 2) I know, that $$ τ = \frac{L}{R} $$ but what is $R$ in this formula? It seems to be the total resistance, but how to find it in 1) and 2)?
2
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1answer
93 views

Help Understanding Non-conservative Fields

While watching a video lecture, I became uncomfortable with the results, (around 35 mins). The professor draws an electric circuit with a 1V batter, and two resistors (1 and 9 ohms). He then ...
2
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1answer
1k views

How does a voltage independent current source work?

So I'm having some trouble understanding what a voltage independent current source is. How can you have a current without a voltage. as I understand it voltage or EMF is the force that drives the ...
2
votes
1answer
273 views

What electric potential is found over individual resistors connected in series to an AC power supply?

Given a set of resistors connected in series to an AC power supply: What formula governs the peak-to-peak voltage which will be measured when voltage is probed over individual resistors and sets of ...
2
votes
2answers
38 views

Is there Phase difference between voltages at end points of a long AC Power line

I found this explanation somewhere: Since wavelength=c/freq so in a AC power line of 50 Hz, wavelength=(3*10^8)/50 = 6000 Km, so voltage phase reverses after 6000 Km in a ac Power line. Now this ...
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2answers
49 views

Electric motors and change in flux

"When a current passes through an electric motor, the magnetic force on the motor causes a torque on the loop of wire causing it to turn". However, when the loop rotates, there should also be a ...