Voltage is the unit of measurement for electronic potential, from one point location to another.

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37 views

Is impedance the ratio of voltage to current at any instant?

My book defines impedance as the ratio between the amplitude of voltage to that of the current (Vmax to Imax), I just wanted to make sure whether its also true for the instantaneous values of voltage ...
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0answers
27 views

Accelerating voltage relationship to energy

if I have the accelerating voltage, how can I obtain the energy in eV? Basically, I asked someone for the energy, but instead they gave me the accelerating voltage. What more data would I need to ...
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4answers
98 views

Relationship among heat generated, power, current and voltage

Can you help me understand the relationship between current, voltage and heat generated? I tried two sets of heated gloves. One uses a battery which generates 7.4 volts x 2 amperes (14.8 watts of ...
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1answer
14 views

grounding spherical shells

a Q1 charged spherical shell A with radius of a is inside a Q2 charged spherical shell B with radius b. now A is grounded. since no force is acting on Q1 all of them should be neutralized. and at the ...
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1answer
37 views

Ohm's law deviation

In terms of superconductivities and diodes (I do not know anything else except these), Ohm's law deviate from a linear relation. I search many titles or tags for this but I did not understand properly ...
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1answer
53 views

Potential Dividers - Why do I need the second resistor?

So I am doing the OCR Physics GCSE course, and I have just learnt about potential dividers in electronic circuits. I get that the first resistor steps down the voltage so a component with a lower ...
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3answers
81 views

Potential Difference Across Components in Parallel & Series Circuits

So I have two questions, but they're kind of linked so I'm putting them in one. 1) I have a simple circuit with a battery connected to three lamps in series. If I then add a second battery but ...
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2answers
61 views

Why don't capacitor charging graphs look like other exponential growth graphs?

Sorry if this question is stupid, but I can't find any answers for this online. Physics websites show that capacitors charge and discharge exponentially. The discharging graphs of charge against time ...
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0answers
43 views

Wind turbine design question [closed]

I am planning to design a wind turbine that is has rotor blade radius of 0.915m and is connected to a generator. The generators specifications are, it is an ac generator with 5000 coil turnings and a ...
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3answers
88 views

Voltage drop across capacitors in series, why?

Basically when you connect more than 1 capacitor in series then the charge on each capacitor is same but there is a voltage drop across each capacitor. I have no intuition as to why the voltage drop ...
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2answers
33 views

DC motor, bulbs

What happens when you are getting low voltages ? Why fan becomes slow and bulb become dim ? Dye to low voltage or current? If power is V*I then due to low voltage current becomes low or not Many ...
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3answers
58 views

Charge moved across a potential difference; where does the energy for emitted radiation come from?

Let's use an electron and a 1V potential difference as a mode. In school I learned that if the electron is at the negative end of the electric field, its potential energy is equal to the work that ...
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3answers
90 views

What happens to the electrons when the voltage is increased?

I know that when the current increases, there are more electrons passing by per second. And I know as well that voltage is some difference in charge between the anod and katod. But, what I think I ...
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0answers
47 views

Voltage and reactive power

Why are reactive power and voltage related? When the control system of a generator increases/decreases the current of the rotor, voltage and reactive power are increased/decreased.What is the relation ...
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1answer
67 views

Self capacitance

I have two spheres of metal, each of radius $1m$, these spheres are effectively an infinite distance apart. I now connect a $1V$ power supply between these two spheres: (and wait an infinite amount ...
4
votes
1answer
74 views

Why is 2-terminal sensing less accurate than 4-terminal sensing if the internal resistance of leads is known?

I have a pretty good understanding of 2-terminal vs. 4-terminal (kelvin) sensing measurements. I understand that in the 4-terminal measurement, current is supplied by 2 terminals that are separate ...
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5answers
178 views

Resistance vs Power experiment - not linear relationship? [closed]

Ok, so I have been performing a lab experiment in class involving resistors. We were asked to set up 3x 47Ω resistors in 6 different combinations in a circuit with a 6V power supply. We also attached ...
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1answer
37 views

Continuing on voltage drop across a resistor [closed]

What exact wire diameter allows approximately $6.25\cdot 10^{18}$ electrons to pass in 1 second? Will a thinner diameter or a wider diameter wire allow the same approximate number of electrons in a ...
0
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3answers
90 views

$P=VI$ and $P=V^2/R$ [duplicate]

How come equation a) $P=VI$ says if you double voltage, power is doubled while according to equation b) $P=V^2/R$ says power quadruples? Which one is correct?
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1answer
38 views

Proving an AC current with peak amplitude of 311V is equivalent to a DC current of 220V [closed]

If one starts with an alternating current in the form of a sin wave with a peak amplitude of 311V and then goes through the usual RMS procedure of integrating $sin^2$ from 0 to 2$\pi$ then the result ...
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3answers
83 views

Why do we say that there is a voltage drop only when charge passes through a resistor? [closed]

This is a little confusing for me. I will just ask a few questions: First: Am I correct in saying that while traversing through the circuit, charge looses some electric potential(not energy) at ...
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votes
3answers
88 views

Doesn't any massive conductor look like “ground” to an AC supply?

I've been puzzling over this excellent answer to the perennial "Why don't I get shocked by a hot wire if I'm not grounded?" question. The orders of magnitude just don't seem right for two reasons: ...
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1answer
69 views

Short circuit in superposition

I'm really confused about the concept of short circuits. I don't understand, why when you short those two voltage sources, 20 and 10 ohm resistors become parallel? What happens with 4, 12, 15 ohm ...
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1answer
72 views

Transformer do not work in DC (50Hz) digital signal? [closed]

condition 1: By passing DC current through copper coil it generate the magnetic field. condition 2: By moving magnet around cooper wire it generate current. When DC current of 50Hz passes through ...
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2answers
35 views

Voltage across a resistors

When i was doing the practice problems, I found the following problem: I was able to solve for everything except for V4. When I looked at the solution manual,solution was as follows: Use KVL: V4 = ...
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0answers
24 views

Data acquisition from Pins ( 5Volt) [closed]

I'm trying to creat a data acquisition system using: computer Geosig ve-53 KPci3101 from the seismic sensor's manual we can see that every pin's output is a 5 volt (or 10?), my question is, how ...
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2answers
64 views

Solving for node voltages

I have the following circuit and i need to solve Is, v1 and v2. First of all, I assumed that this problem will involve supernode principle since there is a voltage source between V1 and V2. Then, i ...
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2answers
78 views

Touching one end of a battery

What happens when I touch one end of a battery? Is there any flow of charge from the battery to my body? I know that connecting a battery to both ends of capacitor causes the charge from one plate ...
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1answer
130 views

How is a variable potential divider able to reduce current/voltage through a component to zero, unlike a variable resistor?

For example, the diagram in my text book shows a filament lamp, in series with a uniform resistive wire, which can have its voltage and current varied by moving the sliding contact, e.g., a ...
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1answer
46 views

Why is resistance $U/I$ rather than $I/U$?

What is the difference between resistance and conductance and why is resistance $U/I$ and not $I/U$? (I know $I/U$ is conductance.) But I don't see the difference between both.
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1answer
47 views

Why does a variable potential divider have the ability to reduce current through a component to zero

For example, the diagram in my text book: shows a filament lamp, in series with a uniform resistive wire, which can have its voltage and current varied by moving the sliding contact, e.g., a ...
1
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1answer
107 views

Accelerating potential

Will an accelerating potential accelerate a neutral atom? For example, consider an atom of hydrogen subjected to an accelerating potential of $V$. As the kinetic energy of a particle accelerated by a ...
0
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1answer
107 views

How is a potential divider able to reduce current to zero?

For example, a filament lamp, in series with a uniform resistive wire, can have its voltage varied by moving the sliding contact, e.g., a rotatable wheel. However, why is a potential divider able to ...
0
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0answers
20 views

How to calculate ion lithium battery voltage?

I have raw data from cyclic voltammetry test of ion-lithium battery. But I need nominal voltage or Open Circuit Voltge (OCV), like is reported in the literature. But I only have Voltage (V) vs ...
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2answers
115 views

What exactly is potential difference? What are the factors that effect it?

I am asking this question because at first I thought that this concept was pretty clear to me, but it is not. So, my first question: Is potential difference only a property of an electric field? If ...
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1answer
46 views

$P=V^2/R$ confusion

I am confused on how to apply the formula $P=\frac{V^2}{R}$ If I am given a bulb say with power 60W and it is connected to a supply of 120V. Then the resistance of the bulb is 240$\Omega$ but if ...
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2answers
223 views

Transformers: relation between their current, voltage and resistance

My current understanding Transformers are used to step up and down voltage keeping power constant. Hence, for example, if I step up some voltage, the current will decrease in the secondary circuit. ...
2
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0answers
36 views

How to control a dc motor? [closed]

I am in 8th standard and I am doing a project on 3d printing pens. I want to know how to control a dc motor, so that when I press a button it should increase its speed gradually till it reaches its ...
1
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2answers
149 views

Understanding parallel plate capacitors [closed]

I need help with understanding this assignment. I originally though of using the equation of Eo*A/D = Q/ΔV but I don't know how to answer this without actual numbers to plug in besides the epsilon-not ...
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0answers
44 views

Voltage wave reflections in transmission line loaded by matched resistor

Suppose I have a power source, a transmission line and a resistive load all connected together and all sharing the same impedance. If I send a voltage pulse starting at the power source, traveling ...
1
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0answers
47 views

Determining initial voltage across a capacitor [closed]

This one has got me stumped. I have a graph of voltage vs time and a corresponding power vs time graph. Taking the integral of the power vs time graph gives me the work done on the capacitor. Now the ...
1
vote
1answer
19 views

Build a device that can set voltage according to intensity of the light shined [closed]

I want to build a device that uses photodiodes and photoresistors to set the voltage in the circuit that shines a bulb. The idea is simple. When the light is intense, the bulb should shine less, when ...
3
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2answers
187 views

Charging by induction

When we charge an conductor by induction and grounding, we first bring a negative charge to the conductor. As a result the mobile electrons of the conductor get repelled and stay far from the negative ...
2
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3answers
137 views

What changes in the electrons before and after a voltage drop?

It is easy to visualize gravitational potential energy as a function of the position of height, and a change in this potential is manifested in a change in height. Further, by the work-energy theorem ...
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0answers
30 views

Potential difference across a resistor

I would like to know if the potential difference between the two ends of the resistance is same as the potential difference between any tow points in the resistance whose length is smaller than the ...
4
votes
2answers
103 views

Kirchoff's rules and inductance

Can Kirchoff's loop rule be applied in a scenario involving an inductor? Kirchoff's loop rule states that the closed loop integral of E dot dl is equal to zero. But, in a situation with an inductor, a ...
0
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1answer
51 views

Electric field along a wire and load

I have referred to many books and all of them apply loss in potential across a resistor only in case of circuits. However, the electric field is present in the whole conductor. Hence the electrons ...
0
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1answer
157 views

Why is current shared in a parallel circuit but not a series circuit?

Electricity test coming up. It's not clear to me why current is shared in a parallel circuit but not a series circuit.
0
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1answer
73 views

Applying Kirchoff voltage law to a short circuit

If you consider an ideal wire with no resistance that shorts an ideal battery, the only voltage drop that exists is the emf of the battery, with nothing to balance it. Obviously in the real world ...
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0answers
21 views

How polarized object's polarized atoms behaves like charge?

Electrical polarization is just the shifting of the constituent atoms' protons and electrons in opposite directions. This creates a bound charge, and this bound charge creates voltage and thus an ...