Questions related to the perception and measurement of light (primarily in the visible range), its mathematical description, the reproduction of colors by different means, color combinations, etc. Please use the tag [electromagnetic-radiation] if you want to refer to the general form of light.

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8
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3answers
594 views

Why doesn't light affect a compass?

In our daily life a lot of photons of visible light, infrared and radio etc move around us. We know that light is an electromagnetic radiation. So why doesn't that electromagnetic radiation affect a ...
0
votes
3answers
163 views

Is purple in visible light?

This isn’t a duplicate. I read those pages, but those didn’t answer my questions. Please watch this. Does visible light consist of red, orange, yellow, green, cyan and blue? No purple? My definition ...
0
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0answers
22 views

Light Intensity after refraction [on hold]

I have a bottle of water and I wanna measure the intensity of sunlight in different angles of sun radiation over the horizon (after refraction). Could you help me? radius of bottle : 5 cm Refractive ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Does a photon travel in all directions?

For example i am standing and a beam of light is passing in front of me. I am able to see that beam of light so does it mean that photons are travelling in all directions other than the photons which ...
-6
votes
0answers
41 views

Horrible crossword [on hold]

There's this physics crossword that is giving me a lot of trouble Water waves do this when they pass from deep to shallow water (7) _ e _ r _ _ _ Carries information by total internal reflection of ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Moving electric charges

I just wanted to double-check these three statements, as I'm not entirely sure I understood them completely: 1) A stationary electric charge (let's say a proton) produces electric field. 2) A moving ...
4
votes
2answers
489 views

Why do we use microwaves in microwave oven?

We know that any object above absolute zero emits electromagnetic radiation. So hotter the object shorter the wavelengths. In the electromagnetic radiation spectrum radio waves has the longest then ...
14
votes
3answers
881 views

Why is the bottom part of a candle flame blue?

What’s the explanation behind the bottom part of a candle flame being blue? I googled hard in vain. I read this. I don’t understand how it’s explained by the emission of excited molecular radicals in ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

How does the Luminosity Function relate to the tristimulus sensitivity function?

In colorimetry, the irradiance spectrum is weighted with the luminosity function to obtain the perceived luminosity, and the tristimulus sensitivity functions to obtain the perceived ...
2
votes
1answer
22 views

How to build a MOKE (magneto-optic Kerr effect) magnetometer at home?

I'd like to build a magnetometer at home. The type does not matter actually that much but it should be doable at home. The MOKE (magneto-optic Kerr effect) magnetometer at least appears to use ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

How is ink's color produced?

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complementary_colors The pairs of complementary colors vary depending upon whether the colors are physical (e.g. from pigments), or from light. These change ...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

Refraction of light marching band analogy

When trying to understand the refraction of light when it hits a slower medium, lots of people seem to be enlightened by the 'marching band' or 'marching soldiers' analogy, which 'explains' that when ...
-9
votes
0answers
84 views

Theoretical model of the universe [closed]

Goodmorning, I have worked for some time now on a completely "new" model of the universe, light and stuff that matters. Will one soul on this earth read, really read, and understand my model? or at ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Interference of waves

Every thing has a dual nature. So if we take waves(consider light interference) as particles, exactly what happens during interference (both constructive and destructive)? Can you explain in easy ...
4
votes
1answer
64 views

Why “colours” of light are given in wavelength not frequency?

If I understand correctly, when a beam of (monochromatic) light passes through media of different refractive indices, its wavelength changes but frequency remains constant. Why, then, are colours of ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Can other animals see black differently? [on hold]

I am not sure if this is the right place for this question, but this is a debate that has been going on between two colleagues for days and I need a resolution because it's driving me crazy. So any ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Has the knowlege of rainbows gained from snell's law ever been used in a practical way? [closed]

So, I'm an AP physics 2 student at the moment, and I'm learning about Snell's law and refraction. Due to the changing speed of light (for these purposes; I am aware that C is constant) in water ...
0
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0answers
19 views

Why does the spectrum for deuterium show a weak line at H-alpha?

I was wondering why the spectrum for deuterium shows a weak line at H-alpha, the first line in the hydrogen spectrum.
3
votes
0answers
31 views

Beating the Diffraction Limit with NSOM

I am trying to understand exactly why we can beat the diffraction limit when using near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM). For those who aren't familiar with NSOM, check out this article: ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

Models of light

As far as I'm aware, there are two different (and almost contradictory) models that describe the behavior of light: light as a wave (EM), and light as a particle (QM). From what I've heard, depending ...
3
votes
4answers
374 views

Why wire filament shakes inside a light bulb?

My light bulb cast a clear light toward adjacent wall and I can clearly see, that wire filament inside bulb shakes, though lamp itself does not moves even an inch What is causing this? Is it a ...
3
votes
5answers
185 views

Isn't all light polarised?

I apologize if my question does not make sense.(I'm teaching myself microscopy.) So reading Fundamentals of Light Microscopy and electronic imaging by Douglas&Murphy, at one point the author ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

What happens if light is trapped between two points?

The image can explain my question In the image light is clearly trapped.Even if the mirror absorbs energy the light is continously being added, will there be enough force to break the mirror?
1
vote
2answers
39 views

Why doesn't the Sun appear green to our eyes?

The spectrum of the Sun as seen at sea level can be seen at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_Spectrum.png so we can see that wavelengths around green to yellow are the ones that are the ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Does Gravity Act on Any and All Things in the Universe? [duplicate]

I'm studying physics, and the questions below popped up in my head. I learned that all objects on planet Earth fall due to the influence of gravity. A ball falls. A mug cup falls. A coin falls. ...
19
votes
3answers
72k views

Why does the moon sometimes appear giant and a orange red color near the horizon?

I've read various ideas about why the moon looks larger on the horizon. The most reasonable one in my opinion is that it is due to how our brain calculates (perceives) distance, with objects high ...
3
votes
3answers
130 views

Why most of physics is somehow related to light? [closed]

It seems that for the past 200 years, every physicist is concerned about light. For example : Newton's particle model, Young experiment, Photo-Electrict effect and Einstein's formula, Special ...
4
votes
3answers
66 views

Why does the light reflecting off of ocean water sometimes appear 'smoother'?

Looking out the window at some water in the Harbour - I noticed that some parts of the water appear 'smoother' than others. My question is: Why does the light reflecting off of ocean water ...
1
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2answers
57 views

Velocity of light

Velocity of light decreases as it enters a more optically denser medium. So how far can the velocity of light be reduced? Which object has the highest refractive index?
2
votes
2answers
385 views

Finding the illuminance from a triangular light source

Since most light sources in games are point-like, it's pretty difficult to approximate area light sources with point sources. As triangles are a universal form to represent 3D models (thus area light ...
0
votes
2answers
114 views

Why is the spectrum of a blue flame the way it is?

In the spectrum of the blue part in a candle flame, there’s a violet emission at 432 nm due to excited CH* molecules (chemiluminescence). Why 432? Why not 400 or 500? There are emissions at 436, 475 ...
5
votes
1answer
105 views

What causes light to travel through a curved fountain of water?

Today I observed a tilted fountain spurting water upward (the water fell smoothly; no detectable turbulence). A colored light was shown upward into the water as it left its source. This light traveled ...
4
votes
1answer
42 views

Shadow of a ripple?

Suppose a stone is thrown into a pool of crystal clear water and its a bright sunshiny morning. You can observe a shadow of the wave in the bottom of the pool. Why does this happen? Is it due to ...
6
votes
1answer
790 views

Test whether a glass prevents you from getting your Vitamin D portion?

I work in an office with glass, which I believe filters the UV radiation of the sunlight. Is it possible to test if exposure to the light coming through the glass will supply Vitamin D for me as a ...
1
vote
2answers
112 views

Why do I see things better when they're reflected through my iphone screen?

Sometimes looking at a screen for too long hurts. This happens to me when I use my computer or smartphone for too many hours, and my eyes become tired and weak. Lately I noticed that if, instead of ...
2
votes
1answer
6k views

Why does your reflection suddenly turn upside down while slowly walking away from a curved mirror?

Many people should have realised, when looking into a concave curved mirror (or even a rather reflective spoon in that fact) at a close distance, you will see a slightly distorted reflection. But as ...
0
votes
1answer
84 views

Path Difference Due to Angled Incident Light

If light incident on a diffraction grating makes an angle $\alpha$ with respect to the normal to the grating, show how $$m \lambda = d\sin\theta$$ becomes $$m\lambda = d[\sin(\theta - \alpha) + ...
3
votes
3answers
96 views

How is it possible for the wavelength of light to change in a medium?

So my physics class has just finished a long unit on optics while at the same time I've been trying to teach myself relativity. I admit my understanding is probably rudimentary, but I figured all the ...
27
votes
13answers
39k views

Why is light called an 'electromagnetic wave' if it's neither electric nor magnetic?

How can light be called electromagnetic if it doesn't appear to be electric nor magnetic? If I go out to the sunlight, magnets aren't affected (or don't seem to be). And there is no transfer of ...
3
votes
1answer
43 views

Young's double slit experiment and intensity

I want to ask a question about double slit interference and the pattern that it produces on a screen (for example in Young's Experiment with a laser beam). I understand the reason that you see a ...
-1
votes
0answers
40 views

we know that light travels in a straight line, but why? [duplicate]

Our observations indicate that light travels in a straight line, but why should it? If I were to travel along with that photon, my time would stop. There would be no past or future, so I reAlly ...
4
votes
6answers
4k views

Do photons have acceleration?

Photons travel at the fastest speed in our universe, the speed of light. Do photons have acceleration?
1
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2answers
5k views

Is turquoise closer to blue or green?

I am having a discussion with my coworkers. Does anyone know what is the wavelength of turquoise color and whether it is closer to green or blue when comparing their wavelengths ?
2
votes
1answer
36 views

How can shadows ever be sharp?

When I hold my hand underneath my lamp, the shadow my hand casts is crisp and sharp, meaning that the edges are well defined and not blurred. But according to Huygen's principle, shouldn't the light ...
27
votes
4answers
4k views

Why are stars white?

That is may be a easy question, but I am not a professional. The sun is a star and when I look at the sun is usually yellow. Why stars in the night are white? I suppose is for the distance. What is ...
0
votes
1answer
10 views

Saturation point of incident Light on an object

Since the color of objects depends on the parts of the visible spectrum reflected out and the remaining is absorbed; is there any maximum limit to which the absorption can take place? In other words, ...
7
votes
1answer
141 views

Is that a result of thin-film interference?

Several years ago, I was laying on my bed and had a CD shaped transparent plastic disk (which was covering a 100 CD stack), basically a transparent CD. I don't know why but I took my phone and took a ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Why is there lightning where there are no clouds?

Recently my family and I went onto the balcony to observed the stars in the night sky. We started to see flashes in the sky and we realized that it was lightning (non fork lightning). I looked around ...
33
votes
6answers
4k views

Where do photons go when they are absorbed?

The answer I usually get (and I'm paraphrasing here) is that they disappear and are instead absorbed as heat energy. But I find it hard to believe that the photon simply "disappears." Common sense ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

How can a camera zoom & photograph the sun without damaging the lens?

I find Huge images of sun in google images, i doubt that if we zoom the sun's image by using camera, then definitely sunlight will also get intensified leads to lens damage nothing but acting like ...