Vector-fields are vector valued functions which define a vector at each point in space. Examples of the vector field include the electric field and the velocity of a fluid.

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What is the criterion for a vector field (dim > 1) to be conservative?

We know that if the curl vanishes: $$ \nabla \times \vec{v} = 0$$ then the field is irrotational and is conservative, but what about in higher dimensions than 1? The cross product is not defined ...
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1answer
58 views

Wightman function for massless vector fields in Coulomb gauge

I've been looking for quite some time an expression for the Wightman functions for a massless vector field in the Coulomb gauge $\nabla\cdot\mathbf{A}=0$ (I think it is equivalent to the Feynman gauge ...
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2answers
172 views

Conservation of energy and Killing-field

In general relativity we have no general conservation of energy and momentum. But if there exists a Killing-field we can show that this leads to a symmetry in spacetime and so to a conserved quantity. ...
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2answers
76 views

Divergence-free vector field on a non-simply connected domain

We know that divergence-free vector fields are themselves curls of vector fields on simply connected domains. I want to construct a counterexample in the case the domain is not simply connected. So ...
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1answer
78 views

Finding the electric and magnetic fields from the vector potential $\vec A=\vec{E_0} e^{i(\vec k\cdot\vec r-\omega t)}$

I am trying to find the electric and magnetic fields from the vector potential $$\vec A=\vec{E_0} e^{i(\vec k\cdot\vec r-\omega t)},$$ I know $$\vec B=\vec \nabla\times \vec A$$ and $$\vec ...
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2answers
173 views

Direction of H and B inside and outside a bar magnet

I seem to have encountered a contradiction when thinking about the directions of $\textbf{H}$ and $\textbf{B}$ inside and outside a bar magnet. Suppose that a bar magnet has a roughly constant ...
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1answer
46 views

A leaf floating on the surface of water (in $x$-$y$ plane) curl along positive $z$ axis [closed]

A leaf floating on the surface of water (in x-y plane) show that for a very small circular leaf ($\nabla \times \overrightarrow v $) is equal to twice the angular velocity of rotation of the leaf, ...
2
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1answer
41 views

Details on the magnetic field of a linearly polarized electric wave

Suppose we are in vacuum and we have an electric field $\vec{E}$ which we assume is simple harmonic wave that propagates through $z$ and is linearly polarized in the $x$-$y$ plane along $x$ i.e. ...
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0answers
99 views

Constructing Killing tensors from Killing vectors

Background: After reading about Carter constant and symmetries in GR, I became interested in Killing tensors. I tried reading this paper by Alan Barnes, Brian Edgar and Raffaele Rani, discussing ...
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1answer
217 views

Derivation of one-form/vector equation in Carroll confusion

I don't understand the derivation of Equation 2.14$$\mathrm{d}f\left(\frac{d}{d\lambda}\right)=\frac{df}{d\lambda} \tag{2.14}$$ in Carroll's Lecture Notes on General Relativity ...
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2answers
455 views

Killing Vectors in Schwarzschild Metric

Given the Schwarzschild metric with $(-,+,+,+)$ signature, $$ds^2=-\left(1-\frac{2M}{r}\right)dt^2+\left(1-\frac{2M}{r}\right)^{-1}+r^2(d\theta^2+\sin^2\theta\,d\phi^2)$$ the lack of dependence of ...
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1answer
82 views

Killing vectors in General Relativity?

I'm looking to derive the surface area of the event horizon of a Schwarzschild black hole. I was just wondering if it were possible for someone to explain to me this: $$ ...
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0answers
71 views

How do I derive Feynman rules for vectors involving derivatives?

Suppose I have a term in the Lagrangian: $$\cal{L} \equiv (\partial_\mu B^+_\nu) B^{-\mu} A^\nu $$, where $B^\pm$ are charged massive vector particles and $A$ is photon. Now, how can we derive the ...
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1answer
210 views

Gradient, divergence and curl with covariant derivatives

I am trying to do exercise 3.2 of Sean Carroll's Spacetime and geometry. I have to calculate the formulas for the gradient, the divergence and the curl of a vector field using covariant derivatives. ...
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1answer
85 views

To prove, $\nabla.(\nabla\phi \times \nabla\psi)$ =0 [closed]

Please Help me solving the problem using levi-cevita symbol : Prove That, $\nabla.(\nabla\phi \times \nabla\psi)$ =0 where $\phi =\phi(x,y,z)$ & $\psi=\psi(x,y,z)$
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2answers
44 views

Faraday's law and potential along a closed curve

$$\int(\nabla \times \vec{E}) \cdot d\vec{S} = \oint \vec{E}\cdot d\vec{l} = -\frac{\mathrm{d} \phi_b}{\mathrm{d} t}$$ The second expression is the potential difference along a closed curve. Isn't ...
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3answers
118 views

Why exactly are fields so crucial to modern physics?

I have read that fields were the mathematical tool that allowed people like Laplace to develop a working model of the Solar System where Newton could not. But my understanding is that fields are ...
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4answers
134 views

Significance of curl ($\nabla\times\boldsymbol{V}$)

What is the physical significance of curl $$\nabla\times\boldsymbol{V}~?$$ I mean I read 'curl V represents the rotation of the vector $V$. My question what is it about the term ...
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3answers
109 views

Work done by a constant vector field is 0?

We know that $$\oint \boldsymbol{F}\cdot d\boldsymbol{r}= \iint (\nabla \times \boldsymbol{F})\cdot d\boldsymbol{s}.$$ Now if $\boldsymbol{F}$ is a constant vector, then $\nabla \times ...
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1answer
68 views

Clarification about some steps in the derivation of the Lie derivative (mechanics)

First of all, this question may seem to be undefined, because I'm not sure how to connect this (to me) newly introduced concept with the abstract notion of the Lie derivative. I'm not even sure if I ...
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1answer
40 views

Norm of Dilatation operator [closed]

The dilatation operator is given by $$D=x^{a}\frac{\partial}{\partial x^{a}}+z\frac{\partial}{\partial z}$$ How the norm can be $$D^{2}=\frac{L^{2}}{z^{2}}(\eta_{\mu\nu}x^{\mu}x^{\nu}+z^{2})$$ where ...
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1answer
135 views

Gradient one-form [duplicate]

I am trying to understand what gradient one-form means actually. In the book that I'm following (A first course on General Relativity by Schutz) it's told that gradient is a one-form and it's ...
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1answer
99 views

Proving the invariance of the inner product

If we define the inner product as ${\textbf{u}\cdot\textbf{v}=g_{ij}u^{i}v^{j}}$, where ${g_{ij}}$ is the metric tensor, ${S}$ and ${T}$ are transformation matrices, ${S}$-for covariant indices and ...
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1answer
56 views

Vector calculus trouble in Hamilton's equations / particle in E.M.field [closed]

As part of applying Hamilton's equations to a particle in an electromagnetic field, one step is to take $\dot{\mathbf{p}} = - \dfrac{\partial H}{\partial \mathbf{r}} = -\nabla H = - \nabla ...
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0answers
52 views

Little problem with surface integral

I've read a problem and I think there's a mistake in it. The problem is as follows. Note: The surface is the surface of a sphere. \begin{equation} \oint\frac{d\vec{a}}{d} \end{equation} Where ...
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0answers
73 views

Tangent Vectors as Infinitesimal Displacements

I'm reading Wald's General Relativity, and I'm stuck on something that is stated very early on in the book. For an abstract manifold $M$, he goes through the usual definition of a tangent vector at ...
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1answer
211 views

How can I mathematically describe the parallel transport in the Roman soldiers example?

I've been trying to understand parallel transport. Many of the descriptions present a mathematical version: $\nabla_V X = 0$. And/or they present an example involving soldiers (usually Roman) ...
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0answers
38 views

Helical killing vector

A killing vector X is defined as a vector field that satisfies the relation $$\mathcal{L}_X g_{\mu\nu}=0.$$ which basically means that if one were to transport the metric along this vector, there ...
2
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1answer
197 views

Differentiation of a vector with respect to a vector

Does differentiation of a vector with respect to a vector make any sense? Even if it makes sense, how does it make any physical meaning? I mean what is the physical interpretation?
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3answers
220 views

Curl of a vector field [closed]

What is the physical interpretation of curl of a vector field? Just as divergence implies flux through a surface. I mean if $\vec A$ is a vector field, what does $\left(\nabla \times \vec A \right)$ ...
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0answers
11 views

Calculating Trajectory in non-Uniform electric field? [duplicate]

Above is the equation of the electric field. Where k is the electric constant, q is the charge on the particle and m is the mass of particle. The particle q initial position is (0,10) and starts off ...
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1answer
53 views

Proving that $\vec F$ is conservative field [closed]

I need to prove that $\vec F$ is coservative field: $$\vec F=\underbrace{\bigg(yz+\frac{1}{yz} \bigg)}_{Q} \hat i+\underbrace{\bigg(xz-\frac{x}{y^2z} \bigg)}_{P}\hat ...
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4answers
615 views

Why is $F=-\nabla V$?

I came across this equation $$F=-\nabla V$$ where $V$ is potential energy. I do understand that $$F(r)=-\frac{dV}{dr}.$$ Hence does this mean the nabla operator in this case means derivative? Because ...
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1answer
148 views

Deriving gravitational potential energy using vectors

Here is my attempt at derivation: First you must find a vector function for the gravitational force. By the inverse square law, the magnitude of gravitational force between two bodies of mass $m$ ...
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1answer
117 views

Trajectories piecewise smooth?

In my studies of calculus and real analysis I have found the proofs of several theorems, commonly used in physics, such as those concerning the conservativity of fields, for example like If ...
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2answers
166 views

Physical meaning of divergence

While reading the section on Hamiltonian mechanics in Taylor's Classical mechanics, I realized that I didn't fully understand what he was saying when he was explaining why ...
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2answers
67 views

What is the meaning of this definition of potential energy?

The isolated system of particles is being observed. In the coursebook, $\vec F_\mu$ is by definition the vector sum of forces of all other particles acting on $\mu$-th particle. Usually, potential ...
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0answers
63 views

Regarding Ampere's Circuital Law

If I am to show that Ampere's Circuital law holds true for any arbitrary closed loop in a plane normal to the straight wire, with its validity already established for the closed loop being a circle of ...
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1answer
191 views

Why are densities not fields?

I have read (in Statistical mechanics of lattice system 2: exact, series and renormalization group methods by D.A. Lavis and G.M. Bell pg 2 ), that intrinsic variables are either fields or densities. ...
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1answer
53 views

Apparent discrepancy between Lagrange field equation and Maxwell equation [closed]

I am deriving Maxwell's equations from a Lagrange field equation and have come across something I can not figure out no matter how hard I try. The problem is in the signs. If we take the Lagrange ...
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1answer
98 views

Differential form of the law of gravitation potential

I have problem understanding transaction (operations and methods applied) for one equation to other equation. It is about gravitational potential. $${\vec F_{grav}=\frac{GMm_{obj}\vec R}{R^3}}$$ If we ...
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1answer
115 views

Difference of connections in the Killing vector equation

For the Killing vector equation, I sometimes see it written in terms of spin connection $\omega$ and other times in terms of the affine connection $\Gamma$. More clearly ...
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2answers
115 views

How to show flat FRW metric has a time-like conformal Killing vector?

I would like to derive the fact that the flat FRW metric has a time-like conformal Killing vector. Is there an easy way to do this? @ValterMoretti showed how one can do this for metrics with a ...
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0answers
71 views

Conformal time-like Killing vector near null geodesics in all spacetimes?

Is it true that in all spacetimes there is some conformal time-like Killing vector $\tau^a$ in the vicinity of null geodesics? If the above statement is true then can one argue that, for all ...
3
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1answer
70 views

What exactly is conservative vector field?

I'm studying calculus, but since the example involved a physical concept. I will ask here: This is how it goes: This means that in a conservative force field, the amount of work required to ...
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0answers
43 views

Vector fields corresponding to null geodesic congruences in general relativity

I'm working in Minkowski space, and I'm considering some 2D surface, $S$. On each point of the surface, I've computed a null vector, $k^a$, which is orthogonal to it. There will be a unique null ...
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39 views

Potential (which only depends on the length of a position vector) [closed]

a) A potential $U$ only depends on the length $r=|\vec{r}|$ of the position vector $r$. Show that $$\vec{\nabla}U(r)=U'(r)\frac{\vec{r}}{r}. $$ What properties does this vector field have? ...
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1answer
55 views

Books on Liouville Operator

I am looking for a good book doing classical mechanics and statistical mechanics in terms of the Liouville operator. I have not found a lot on this subject and even books like Mathematical Methods of ...
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0answers
56 views

Hamiltonian flow?

I was wondering what the Hamiltonian flow actually is? Here is my idea, I just wanted to know if I am correct about this. So let $(x(t),p(t))' = X_{H}(x(t),p(t))$ are the Hamilton's equations and ...
18
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4answers
860 views

Lie derivative vs. covariant derivative in the context of Killing vectors

Let me start by saying that I understand the definitions of the Lie and covariant derivatives, and their fundamental differences (at least I think I do). However, when learning about Killing vectors I ...