The universe refers to the cosmos; all of space-time and that which exists as part of it. Alternatively, it can refer to the observable universe, which only contains the part we can see. Questions tagged with this should ask about physics at scales the size of the universe or specific properties of ...

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3
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2answers
71 views

Are the implications of an infinite universe necessarily so unsettling

I have often heard it said (by professional cosmologists) that if the universe is infinite, then there necessarily exist infinitely many copies of me repeated throughout. The reasoning seems to be ...
0
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0answers
20 views

How did the gravity of the particles/objects behave at the edge of the expanding universe moments after big bang?

During a very short time after the big bang, the universe must have had an edge of space-time which is very close to all the matter in the universe. The particles which are close to or on the edge ...
0
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0answers
26 views

Does the zero energy universe hold true on some mathematical grounds besides observations?

I was reading Stephen Hawking's 'The theory of everything' when I came across a very interesting type of universe, the 'zero energy universe' since then, I've read some websites but all they used to ...
1
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2answers
180 views

Lattice QCD and attempt to prove that the universe is a simulation [closed]

Assume that we have access to a computer with unlimited computing power. As with the Lattice QCD can try to prove that we live in a simulated universe? Apparently, one may use the issue of cosmic ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Is there an absolute center of mass exist in the universe? [duplicate]

By the "absolute center of mass" I mean the center of all the matter that exists in a given moment. My friend asserted that today and it intrigued us very much but since we only have a CS degree and ...
3
votes
3answers
568 views

Does (it make sense to say that ) the universe has a center?

I was reading this page: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2011/oct/23/brian-cox-jeff-forshaw-answers and I found this sentence by Brian Cox: That seems to imply that everything is flying away ...
0
votes
2answers
59 views

What is entropy of the universe? [duplicate]

What is entropy of the universe? What is the change in entropy of our universe? Is this change increases or decreases? If the entropy of universe keeps on increasing then what are the consequences? Is ...
2
votes
4answers
226 views

Is our universe an emulation?

I was watching one of Neil Degrasse Tyson talks and there was a scientist (can't recall his name sorry) who was talking about a recent discovery: "Doubly-even self-dual linear binary ...
3
votes
2answers
46 views

Will the Universe eventually stop expanding

Sorry if this is a naive question, not being even a part qualified physicist in any way shape or form. I've read that the universe is expanding and the rate of expansion is increasing. The assumption ...
6
votes
2answers
182 views

Is there a consensus on the fate of our universe?

We all know that our universe is inflating from what is known as the Big Bang. However, will our universe continue to inflate at the current rate? Or after reaching a maximum size, will it collapse in ...
2
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2answers
377 views

Wouldn't the presence of dark matter slow the expansion of the universe?

If there is a huge element of dark matter in the universe, wouldn't this extra gravity prevent the accelerated expansion of the universe?
1
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1answer
67 views

The universe appears to have a lower bound in the time dimension, why not an upper bound?

The Big Bang looks like a lower bound to the "size" of the universe in the time dimension. Could it also have an upper bound, some furthest point in time from the Big Bang?
3
votes
1answer
113 views

How far can something travel in a straight line?

Suppose you have an object some distance from you and moving at a velocity different to the Hubble velocity you'd expect at that point. How does the motion of this object change with time? Does it ...
11
votes
4answers
594 views

Can physics get rid of the continuum?

Almost every physical equation I can think of (even though I don't actually feel comfortable beyond the scope of classical mechanics and macroscopic thermodynamics, as that's enough for dealing with ...
10
votes
4answers
6k views

Size of universe after inflation?

Wikipedia states the period of inflation was from $10^{-36}$sec to around $10^{-33}$sec or $10^{-32}$sec after Big Bang, but it doesn't say what the size of the universe was when inflation ended. ...
5
votes
4answers
486 views

Expansion of the Universe, will light from some galaxies never reach us?

Is it true that the light from some galaxies will never reach us? The explanation for that is that the Universe expanding faster than the speed of light. But, if the speed of light is constant in ...
26
votes
4answers
3k views

Why does a flat universe imply an infinite universe?

This article claims that because the universe appears to be flat, it must be infinite. I've heard this idea mentioned in a few other places, but they never explain the reasoning at all.
-1
votes
1answer
70 views

Leonard Susskind said that the small value of the cosmological constant could mean that the universe is much bigger than we thought. Why?

He said that near the beginning of this Youtube video that it could mean that the universe is much bigger than he had thought that it was, and that the cosmological constant wasn't even a constant. I ...
3
votes
1answer
189 views

What is the equation for the scale factor of the universe, a(t), for the best fit of data to the $\Lambda CDM$ Model of Cosmology?

Ideally I like a single formula or multiple formulas for different time ranges that would cover the time from the end of inflation through 100+ billion years after the big bang using the $\Lambda ...
48
votes
10answers
4k views

Is time continuous?

While working on physics simulation software, I noticed that I had implemented discrete time (the only type possible on computers). By that I mean that I had an update mechanism that advanced the ...
3
votes
3answers
371 views

Shouldn't stars disappear from our view due to expansion?

The currently accepted theory of the expansion of the universe would suggest that for any point in the universe, there is a 'boundary' (somewhat like the Schwarzschild radius) beyond which it cannot ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

How did the universe get so big so fast? [duplicate]

The universe started at the big bang around 15 billion years ago. The universe is now at least 92 billion light-years in diameter. Together, don't these mean that the universe, at some time in the ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

A well-defined quantum probability in the beginning of the universe?

In mathematics or statistics, a well defined probability requires a large sample space. However, in the beginning of the universe, when the first quantum collapse happened, the sample space contains ...
5
votes
2answers
88 views

Does expanding space cost energy?

Does the cosmic inflation reduce the energy density (inversely) proportional to the volume, or does the inflation "cost" energy? Is space itself "something" created at the expense of energy?
5
votes
2answers
248 views

Questions about the Jeans length

I have a couple of questions about the Jeans length. Suppose the universe has a homogeneous energy density, except there's a spherical region that is overdense. I understand that if the region is ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Number of Stars vs Value of Omega (Crtitical Density of the Universe)

I may be badly mixing things up here. If I am, please kindly correct me. As I understand it, if the universe was too dense at the start of the big bang, it would have collapsed back in on itself. Too ...
0
votes
2answers
98 views

Does the universe have an edge/boundary/barrier? If yes, what is at the edge? [duplicate]

My question related kind of to asking what the shape of the universe is. Say a hypothetical alien civilization built an faster-than-light spaceship. If they keep flying would they end up where they ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Cosmic Expansion - Why aren't we ripped off yet? [duplicate]

According to Hubble's law, the universe expands exponentially ever since the big bang. If the space-time expands, what effects does it have upon us, (1.Earth, 2.solar system and 3. Milky Way). ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

How has the age of the Universe been derived from the observations made by the Planck mission?

The parameters of $\rm\Lambda CDM$ model have been determined to an amazing high precision from the measurements made by the Planck mission. In particular, the Hubble "constant" (the value of Hubble ...
7
votes
2answers
482 views

What is “Energy” of a vacuum in the context of quantum theory?

I'm not a physicist or cosmologist, so I hope I am asking the right question with the right words here. My question regards the word "energy" as it pertains to quantum vacuum states, and to concepts ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Confusion on entropy in the universe [closed]

I was researching about the heat-death of the universe, and I was wondering if my understanding of it so far is factual to the theory? However, the 3rd Law of Thermodynamics prevents the universe’s ...
0
votes
2answers
281 views

If the universe didn't expand faster than light, would our nights brighter like day?

There's a common QnA which has amused and inspired many kids: There are billions of Stars in the sky. If we combine lights received from all stars, wouldn't it beat Sun? Why is night dark really? ...
2
votes
3answers
827 views

Scale factor and age of the universe

Why is the cosmological scale factor (expansion rate of the universe) not simply the time $t$, i.e. the age of the universe?
2
votes
1answer
86 views

Why is an electric and magnetic field present in all universe?

the Earth has its fields due to the motion of molten metals in the core but how does this whole universe has its fields without any discontinuity? And we can say for sure that fields are present in ...
9
votes
4answers
541 views

Are we big or small?

How does the size of humans compare to the size of other objects in the universe? Are we among the relatively large or the relatively small things? My very preliminary research suggests that the ...
6
votes
2answers
111 views

When was the cosmic background radiation in the visible spectrum?

From what I understand about the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation is that it was from the big bang, and since space has streched and become bigger since then the wavelength of the CMBR has ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Is the universe infinite? [duplicate]

Is the universe infinite? Or is it finite? If it is infinite,it's very difficult to imagine an endless space(though not impossible). But if it's finite, the idea that we can't go beyond a certain ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

How fast to travel to end up where i started from?

I've heard that if one travels far enough in one direction through the universe, one ends up at the starting point, due to the "geometry" of the universe. What rate is space expanding at? Is it in ...
3
votes
1answer
76 views

Estimating age of the universe by Hubble's law?

Hubble's law states that $v=Hx$ Age of the universe is calculated by $T= \frac{x}{v} = \frac{1}{H}$ but the velocity is not constant; it changes with distance, so I think that this equation cannot ...
1
vote
3answers
124 views

If everything in existence were increasing in size at some rate, would we be able to detect it?

Would our eyes observe any changes? What about electronic measurement devices?
7
votes
1answer
163 views

Does everything orbit around some universal “center of mass”?

I have read many questions about the center of the Universe. I even have some favorite ones. I understand the fact that every point in the universe experiences inflation the same way. Also that it ...
4
votes
2answers
544 views

Is there a center of the Universe if the Universe is finite?

Ok, let me make myself clear. I saw all the other questions related to the question, but none of them actually asks the question the way I would put it and therefore no one answers it the way I want ...
9
votes
8answers
583 views

As the universe ages, will we see more stars or less?

After a very long time will we see more stars (due to the fact that more light is get to us) or less stars (as the universe expends and light have to pass larger distance)? In general, can stellar ...
0
votes
3answers
86 views

Did “big bang” radiate light?

According to present day physics nothing existed before the "big bang", even space and time. But often in documentaries, the "big bang" is shown as a ball of light that exploded at some point. If this ...
-3
votes
3answers
169 views

Is Space conserved [closed]

Can space be created or destroyed? Is space conserved? I am not asking for matter,energy and time. Its just a question about conservation of space PS: I am asking for what was there before big bang. ...
2
votes
1answer
139 views

What arguments are in favour of an atomic structure to space-time?

The atomic theory as first theorised by Democritus has been successfully applied to matter and to energy (quanta). Space-time is still generally seen as a continuum. What arguments are there (if any) ...
3
votes
4answers
101 views

Accelerating expansion of the universe: so?

Please help me out, I’m missing something. We know that, right now, space is expanding at roughly 73km/s/Mpc. This means: two points in space 1Mpc away from each other “move” 73 km farther away ...
0
votes
2answers
166 views

What is space made of?

General Relativity posits that matter curves spacetime, such that geodesics point towards the object in question, hence, gravity. Now, how does matter do this? What is spacetime "made of", anyway, ...
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votes
1answer
84 views

Why and how the Universe has (at least) 3 spatial dimensions [closed]

We are conscious to live in a 3 dimension universe. Maybe it has more than 3 spatial dimensions (like the 10 mentioned in the string/M-theory) but that is not my concern here. My question is the ...
0
votes
1answer
143 views

Our universe the surface of a 4-dimensional sphere?

The cosmic microwave background that we observe uniformly around us is usually explained by assuming that our universe is the surface of a four dimensional sphere. That way the uniformity makes sense ...