1
vote
0answers
34 views

How does a simple weighing balance actually work? [duplicate]

I have made a simple sketch of how I think the system looks like. My problem is: I always thought that the angle the balance makes is a function of the difference between the two masses (or the ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Why are non-horizontal levers not considered to be in equilibrium?

Consider a triple-beam balance, like so: An unknown mass is placed on the left pan, and the provided weights are moved on the right until the lever arm comes to rest at an exactly horizontal ...
1
vote
3answers
99 views

Deriving the law of moments

Recall the Law of Moments for a one dimensional rod: "When an object is in equilibrium the sum of the clockwise moments is equal to the sum of the anticlockwise moments." I understand that we ...
0
votes
1answer
112 views

Forces on a helical screw?

The common screws which we use, are right handed helices, the simplest parametric equations of which are:- $$x(s)=\cos(s),y(s)=\sin(s),z(s)=s$$, with $z$-axis as the axis of the helix. My question ...
6
votes
2answers
543 views

Conservation of angular momentum experiment

I've learned in that in this experiment: ...the skater will start rotating faster when she brings her arms in and there is no net torque acting on her. But what would happen to her angular momentum ...
4
votes
1answer
352 views

Why don't couple forces violate Newton's First Law?

If you have some random object at rest and you apply a couple to it, the net force acting on it is zero. However because a moment acts on it, it starts to rotate. So you had an object at rest, a net ...
2
votes
2answers
158 views

Why is moment dependent on the distance from the point of rotation to the force?

The formula for moment is: $$M = Fd$$ Where F is the force applied on the object and d is the perpendicular distance from the point of rotation to the line of action of the force. Why? Intuitively, ...
0
votes
0answers
98 views

Correct way to calculate torque produced by axle

For my electrical engineering course, we had to build a simple DC motor that can lift a coin. I have tested the motor, and here are the results: rotational speed (no load): 3630 RPM (380 rad/sec) ...
0
votes
2answers
424 views

Equilibrium of Force Systems including Torque

please help me to solve this problem.. this is only the #3 on my homework and the only thing i didn't know here is how to calculate the tension T. please teach me how to solve the tension here ...
6
votes
2answers
152 views

Is there an equivalent of a scalar potential for torques?

For a given scalar potential $V$, it is known that the corresponding force field $\mathbf{F}$ can be computed from $$ \mathbf{F} = -\nabla V $$ Suppose a rigid body is placed inside this ...
-1
votes
3answers
847 views

How much torque does it take to turn a doorknob? [closed]

How much torque does it take to turn a doorknob? I'm not looking for an exact answer, just a ballpark for someone who doesn't have a sense of everyday amounts of torque. Here's a very ordinary ...
0
votes
0answers
185 views

Dose the gravitational force produces precession in the spinning top?

I'm new at classical mechanics but the text book says there is the torque in the spinning top which generated only by gravitation. It is hard to explain the situation, I've add the link. ...
2
votes
2answers
176 views

Deriving $T = F\ r = I\alpha$ for a rigid body

For a single point mass : $\tau=F_{t}r=ma_tr=(m r^2)\alpha = I\alpha$ For multiple point masses bound together : $\sum \tau_i = (m_ir_i^2)\alpha = I\alpha$ But how do we go from that to $I\alpha = ...
3
votes
1answer
369 views

Intuitive explanation for why same force applied farther from a hinge causes larger angular acceleration than if applied closer?

A standard example of a problem involving torque is opening a door - the same force F applied far from the hinge causes a larger angular acceleration than if applied close to the hinge. I always had ...
1
vote
0answers
216 views

Torque, lever and mass

The Force used in a catapult is exerted near its axis. If we double the length of the arm of the catapult, but still use the same Force at the same point as before near the same axis, does the ...
1
vote
2answers
96 views

What fraction of peak horsepower do typical 4 door passenger vehicles use?

I was surprised when I looked at the power rating of the engine used on a Humvee. It's only ~190 horsepower, which is exceeded by many sedan engines. So an obvious question is why doesn't my Camry SE ...
5
votes
5answers
2k views

Difference between torque and moment

What is the difference between torque and moment? I would like to see mathematical definitions for both quantities. I also do not prefer definitions like "It is the tendancy..../It is a measure of ...
0
votes
2answers
402 views

Is it reasonable for a heavy door to “open by itself” (ie from differences in air pressure) if it had already been slightly ajar?

If you consider a basically uniform massive door (say, 300 N) where there is some coefficient $\mu_{s,k}$ of static and kinetic friction between the thing on the inside of the door, and where the ...
0
votes
1answer
138 views

Horsepower achieved with multiple motors

Scenario I'm planning to build an electric motor for fun (not for any practical purpose). I recently purchased a shapeoko CNC mill kit and intend to manufacture most of the parts housing, stator etc. ...
2
votes
1answer
657 views

Normal force in a compound pendulum (physical pundulum) system?

Consider a compound pendulum pivoted about a fixed horizontal axis, illustrated by the force diagram on the right: # Okay, I can't figure out where the normal force on the pendlum should point ...
6
votes
4answers
1k views

How do levers amplify forces?

This is really bothering me for a long time, because the math is easy to do, but it's still unintuitive for me. I understand the "law of the lever" and I can do the math and use the torques, or ...
2
votes
0answers
221 views

Why do control moment gyroscopes exhibit “torque amplification”?

There are a number of articles that describe the benefits of using control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) over reaction wheels in inertial navigation applications. One of the primary benefits of using a CMG ...
4
votes
4answers
3k views

Torque vs Moment

I was wondering, why in Newtonian physics torque is called "torque" while in static mechanics they call it "moment"? I prefer by far the term "torque", for not only it sounds strong, but also ...
3
votes
2answers
936 views

Dynamics of moment of inertia

I'd like to be able to determine the angular acceleration of a system of two rotating masses, which are connected so as to have a variable mechanical advantage between the two. My background with ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Torque homework

We have learned that Torque is equal to a force that is perpendicular to a radius (displacement); however, I just cannot grasp one of the study questions we received: A hammer thrower accelerates ...