Time is defined operationally to be that which is measured by clocks. The SI unit of time is the second, which is defined to be

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Why does time dilation cause you to age slower? And is time considered relative to the observer?

I understand that the higher your velocity the slower light will move. But how does time itself slow down while you are moving faster?
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15 views

What does gravitational lensing equal in time diolation to gravity?

How close does a person need to get in a black hole in orbit to get 2x speed in time and what would that equal in g force?
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0answers
46 views

Twin paradox without gravity [on hold]

Suppose we have 3 people Person1 was already born on a spaceship that travels in the speed of 0.5c toward person2 Person2 was born in a point in point in the space also in the exact time of person1 ...
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0answers
32 views

How to find the Average Speed in this question? [on hold]

If the average speed of a spaceship is 32,000 km/h, how long would it take to travel the 80 million km from Earth to Mars? I applied the S = D / T Formula and got 0.0004 h Because this is a ...
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1answer
59 views

Is the age of the Universe relative to where you are within it? [duplicate]

The accepted age of the Universe is 13 billion years give or take. If you were a super space being and hypothetically had spent a large portion of this time sitting next to a black hole then your ...
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1answer
44 views

Is this possible to create a 1D or 2D thing in real? [on hold]

We are living in the fourth dimension(time).So we can now travel through the third dimension. Now just imagine to make a 1 dimension thing, A line in real world. If I draw a line in paper with a ...
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2answers
32 views

Lagrangian mechanics not relying on time or independent of time [on hold]

If neither the potential energy nor kinetic energy depends on time, then Lagrangian is explicitly independent of time I find this statement a little bit odd because velocity is distance over time or ...
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1answer
142 views

Hafele-Keating revisited with a gravity clock

Most modern clocks use electromagnetic phenomena to measure time. There are perhaps some older clocks that involve gravity to some degree (hour glass, pendulum), but I believe they still have a ...
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2answers
119 views

What is the least count of the timer clocks used in RADAR?

I was checking out some videos in YouTube regarding the working principle of RADAR. To quote some HOW IT WORKS: World War II Radar (720p), part 1, How does RADAR work? | James May Q&A | Head ...
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1answer
21 views

Water Boiling Time Calculator

Is there a way to calculate out how quickly a body of water will boil? My primary concern is to measure in relationship to different temperatures. For example, heat at 100 degrees Fahrenheit versus ...
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0answers
77 views

What would a universe with 2 time dimensions be like? [duplicate]

In a universe with 2 dimensions of time, and 3 spatial dimensions, the equation for finding the change in time is: $\Delta T= \sqrt{(\Delta \alpha_1)^2+(\Delta \alpha_2)^2} \geq 0$ Where $T$ is the ...
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1answer
105 views

What is the longitudinal difference between the sub­solar point and the magnetic poles at time $t$ (hours)?

I'm trying to convert geomagnetic coordinate to geographic, but there are some steps in the paper which I'm reading, that I don't understand. I have the geomagnetic latitude centered around the ...
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2answers
58 views

Infinitesimal time intervals use

I've a question, that maybe will sound obvious, on the use of infinitesimal quantities. Consider the expression for the acceleration in non inertial frames. $\frac{d\vec{v}}{dt}=\frac{d\vec{v'}}{dt}...
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1answer
86 views

Is there any Hamiltonian that contains time derivative? [duplicate]

Quantum mechanics is governed by Schrodinger's equation: $$\hat{H}\psi=i\hbar\partial_t \psi$$ It seems that Hamiltonian acts on wave functions like a time derivative. Just out of curiosity, is ...
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2answers
346 views

What time scale is used by the JPL HORIZONS system?

I'm confused by the ust of the term "UT" in the description of time scales used by the JPL HORIZONS system. Their manual states that UT is Universal Time This can mean one of two non-uniform ...
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2answers
253 views

Could time be considered a force

I think I understand the basic concept of spacetime, at least some of it. And when people talk about spacetime they don't call gravity a force, but rather the result of mass interacting with it. And ...
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0answers
37 views

Gravitational time distorting waves [duplicate]

I have got a very interesting question to ask: We receive not only a space distortion (what LIGO has measured) but also a time distortion. I can just imagine how would it look like a time distortion ...
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2answers
193 views

Presentism: doesn't everything exist at the same moment? [closed]

The Help Center recommends I 'fix' this question: (original question) "It seems self-evident that everything exist in the Now. Notwithstanding time-dilation and different rates of the passage of ...
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1answer
53 views

What is Hawking's, “No Boundary Conditions”? [closed]

In his "No Boundary Conditions", is Hawking stating that time is eternal? And what is the difference between Real Time and Imaginary Time? Is he saying there are two different arrows of time, and ...
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3answers
2k views

Is there an actual proof for the energy-time Uncertainty Principle?

As I understand, the energy-time uncertainty principle can't be derived from the generalized uncertainty relation. This is because time is a dynamical variable and not an observable in the same sense ...
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3answers
9k views

Why is a second equal to the duration of exactly 9,192,631,770 periods of radiations?

Why is a second equal to the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of radiation corresponding to the transition between two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium-133 atom? Why is the number ...
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3answers
81 views

How can time be a dimension when it is relative? [closed]

I understand that by definition dimension is defined by just another coordinate to pin-point something in space-time. Therefore we need to know not only where but when. At the same time, this somehow ...
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1answer
2k views

How to determine day/night based on latitude, longitude and a date/time?

Is there a simple method of determining, given a UTC date/time, whether it is day or night at a given lat/long coordinate? I am currently using a formula based on a Sunrise/Sunset Algorithm from the ...
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3answers
81 views

Is “time” a singular dimension or multiple dimensions? [closed]

We know of x, y, and z dimensions. We also know of "time"... Another dimension we are aware of, which is a "non-physical dimension" called a "temporal dimension". Now, we all look at "time" as a "...
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3answers
622 views

Proper time for an accelerating object

As far as I have read so far, proper time is the time measured on the clock of an inertial frame moving uniformly with respect to another inertial frame. The concept and the mathematical expression ...
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1answer
34 views

Is Entropy Maximized, or Just Increased?

Do different real processes involve different rates of change of entropy? (Is the rate of change of entropy constant with time throughout all regions of space, or perhaps in other words, constant with ...
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1answer
41 views

Reference for Reichenbach synchronisation and non-standard special relativity

My professor introduced in the last lesson a new method for clock synchronisation, which he called "Reichenbach synchronisation". In this new method, two clock A and B synchronise themself with the ...
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1answer
684 views

How do photons experience time? [duplicate]

I know that as velocity approaches the speed of light the time dilation shoots to infinity as shown below. 1)So I want to know how time is perceived from the point of view of the photon? 2)Since ...
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25 views

Does photon experience time? [duplicate]

According to the special theory of relativity, for all observers the speed of light is c. Any observer travelling at the speed of light c does not experience time. Hence even protons shouldn't ...
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1answer
264 views

Are we traveling through time at the speed of light? [duplicate]

In the image below the y axis represents time and x represent velocity. Point D represents velocity c, point E represents 1 second per stationary observers second. What this chart is showing is as you ...
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1answer
97 views

Calculating speed in four dimensions [closed]

If you are moving at $c$ in 3D space and $c$ in time axis too, What would be your total speed? Edit: Since question has been voted to be closed, I shall make an Edit. In 4D world all objects move ...
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7 views

Power scaling behavior in Detrended Fluctuation Analysis

I am trying to apply DFA in my time-series, however, remain the the determination linear relationship of the log fluctuation vs. log scale plot i.e. slope which indicates to the power scaling behavior ...
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2answers
384 views

What does $v=c$ in the Lorentz transformation for time tell us?

For the simpler cases as boost in the x-direction, the time dilation formula following the Lorentz transformation for time is $$\Delta t'=\gamma(\Delta t-v\frac{\Delta x}{c^2})$$Now, we observe that ...
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170 views

Is time an observable in Relativistic Quantum Mechanics?

Relativistic Quantum Mechanic is based, as far as I know, in the Dirac Equation. Now, the Schrödinger equation, in the abstract state space takes the form: $$i\hbar \dfrac{d|\psi(t)\rangle}{dt}=H|\...
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1answer
90 views

Period of a pendulum [closed]

In the book 'Calculus the Early Transcendetals' at page 776 (7th edition) they give that the period of a pendulum with length $\text{L}$ that makes a maximum angle $\theta_0$ with the vertical is: $$\...
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3answers
118 views

What does it mean that the laws of physics are time reversible?

The Universe, as far as we can tell, only operates according to laws of physics. And just about all of the laws of physics that we know are completely time-reversible, meaning that the things they ...
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1answer
27 views

Is the time for light to go a certain distance the same amount of time sped up through relativity?

If you were to stand on the tower of my Lemmon and had an atomic clock that was exactly synchronized with one at tucson, (6734 feet difference) for 24 hours, it was shown to be roughly a 20 nano ...
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25 views

Special Relativity and its relation to refractive index [duplicate]

As is known, light slows down (compared to vacuum) whenever it enters a medium. Also, Special Relativity effectively puts a limit on the max. speed of any body. So is it possible for a body (in a ...
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1answer
61 views

How does pressure change over time in an open box?

Imagine that you have a 1 cubic meter metal box with two 20 mm diameter holes. One of them is connected to an air-compressor that constantly pressurizes the inside of cube. Let's say 5 atm. The other ...
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3answers
313 views

Is time dilation based on the formula for period of a pendulum?

The theory Albert Einstein put forward about special relativity mentions a possibility for time dilation, in which he states gravity has a considerable effect on time. And in high school physics we ...
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1answer
43 views

Traveling slower by traveling in opposite direction as the Earth rotates

I know that if I were to travel fast, the time would pass by fast for me. But if I were to travel fast in the opposite direction of the earths rotation while I'm still on earth, would the time pass by ...
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1answer
101 views

How long is a 'sun year'?

I know that a 'sun day' is the time that a sun spot takes to orbit one time across the suns surface (25-30 days dependent on location I think) and what is actually defined as a 'sun year' is how long ...
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2answers
69 views

Is time a coordinate or a parameter in Newtonian mechanics?

In classical (Newtonian) mechanics we only ever seem to consider 3-dimensional space, with physical quantities being represented by 3-vectors. My understanding for this is because in classical (...
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2answers
106 views

Is acceleration relative in relativity?

Suppose a box A is moving relative to a Box B, then by time dilation equation if I take 1 sec passed for an observer in A then for an observer in B will be little longer. Now if I suppose that the box ...
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29 views

How much time a ball stays at rest when throw up?

You throw a ball straight up in the air. The ball attains its maximum height when it is momentarily at rest,(v=0). How mutch time is this moment? If we take time has continuous it is an infinitesimal ...
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21 views

Are there any specific examples of the application of Lewis-Riesenfeld procedure to time dependent Hamiltonians in QM?

Lewis-Riesenfeld invariant theory is a theory applicable to solve time-dependent Schrodinger equations. I have always encountered the theory related to the procedure, however never encountered any ...
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1answer
71 views

What is the best way to calculate impact time with collisions?

I've been teaching myself physics and I've been wondering about the impact time in collision calculations. The scenario I've been using to learn is an object with a mass of 4000 kilograms colliding ...
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1answer
108 views

How can Big Bang happen without time?

I had recently watched a video and he says big bang could have happen by the slow collision rather than a fast collision. But I know that there was no time before the big bang and fast and slow are ...
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2answers
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Why doesn't the existence of proper-time $\tau$ imply a preferred reference frame?

A proper time interval $\Delta\tau$ for a given observer is a relativistic invariant. However, the calculation of $\Delta\tau$ requires reference to some arbitrary coordinate time t: $$\Delta\tau = \...