Time is defined operationally to be that which is measured by clocks. The SI unit of time is the second, which is defined to be

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How to make timelike entanglement in the laboratory?

http://io9.com/5744143/particles-can-be-quantum-entangled-through-time-as-well-as-space http://arxiv.org/abs/1101.2565 How to make timelike entanglement in the laboratory? How to test whether mixed ...
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3answers
280 views

In a very small static universe with only a particle, does it make sense to talk about time?

I am sorry if this question is silly; it′s just one of those things I wished I asked before leaving university. If there were a static universe only as big as the size of two particles, say ...
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0answers
559 views

Is large-scale “time reversal” (Poincaré recurrence) possible given infinite time?

The following are some assumptions I'm basing my question on, from what (little) I understand of physics. I list them so an expert can (kindly) tell me where I'm going wrong. There is a probability ...
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0answers
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What's the relationship between mass and time? [closed]

This question has arisen from a wish to understand an end-of-universe scenario: heat death. Are time and mass intrinsically linked? If so, does time "run slower" (whatever that may mean) in a ...
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5answers
294 views

Two clocks along different worldlines [duplicate]

I have been reading and watching videos about this subject for a while now. I just can not seem to grasp the idea. Let's say we have two clocks. I leave one at home and keep one in my pocket. Then, ...
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6answers
143 views

Wouldn't backwards time travel break the law of conservation of mass? [closed]

We know from the law of conservation of mass that the amount of mass in the universe is constant. Suppose there were a way for a person to travel backwards in time. Let's call this mass $m_t$ for some ...
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2answers
134 views

Does anti-matter increase or decrease in entropy over time?

Antimatter is matter going backwards through time. From a matter-based observer does antimatter: Increase in entropy (and therefore decrease in entropy in its own time) OR Decrease in entropy ...
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4answers
274 views

Time when talking on the phone…?

A few days ago I noticed (I'm sure we all know this) that when talking on the phone you receive the messages a few seconds after it is said by the sender. So person A says "hello" to person B. In ...
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3answers
172 views

How many seconds is a temporal meter?

Is there a proof that time is a 4th dimension? If it is, then why not measure it in units of the previous three? Logical right? How many seconds is a temporal meter?
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2answers
113 views

Is there an equivalent of the Planck length for time?

Is there an equivalent of the Planck length for time? I'd just like a term I may use (high-level) for a similar "unit of time"? I am not looking for a debate on how discrete time might be, but if ...
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1answer
3k views

In general relativity (GR), does time stop at the event horizon or in the central singularity of a black hole?

I was reading through this question on time and big bang, and @John Rennie's answer surprised me. In the immediate environment of a black hole, where does time stop ticking if one were to follow a ...
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2answers
572 views

Mistake in Briefer History of Time by Stephen Hawking [closed]

I was reading A Briefer History of Time by Stephen Hawking and Mlodinow. I found something silly. On page 36 at the bottom, it says the following : If, say, the sun suddenly disappeared, Maxwell's ...
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3answers
101 views

Observing a point 13.82b ly away, 1b years ago

I understand that we can observe far away galaxies to get an idea how the universe looked like in the past. Assuming the universe is 13.82b years old, would it be correct to say that if we looked at ...
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4answers
128 views

What's the differences between time in Physics and time in everyday use?

OK. This question might sound as not a good question, but the word 'time' is so confusing to me. I mean thermodynamics says time is the product of entropy. Relativity says time is relative. Quantum ...
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1answer
270 views

Is there a physical quantity which is the reciprocal/multiplicative inverse of time?

Is there a physical quantity which is the reciprocal/multiplicative inverse of time? If time =distance/speed what is speed/distance. Please forgive my ignorance if there is a really simple ...
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2answers
267 views

Twin Paradox in case of two twins that don't meet

If there are two twins. such that one of them goes on a space voyage maintaining a constant velocity, and that one never returns to earth, and the twins decide to never meet but send information about ...
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4answers
527 views

How can the big bang occur mathematically?

As we know time began with the big bang. Before that there was no time, no laws, nothing. Mathematically how can an event take place when no time passes by? How did the big bang took place when there ...
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4answers
179 views

Astronaut travels 16 lightyears and ages 15 years - am I misreading this question?

The astronaut is travelling to a star sixteen lightyears away. During this trip he ages fifteen years. What is the speed u at which the astronaut travels? It's obvious he can't be traveling at ...
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2answers
504 views

Is the second defined arbitrarily? [duplicate]

According to the definition a second is defined as the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of ...
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2answers
318 views

Is time subjective?

In Minkowski spacetime time is subjective [or more precisely: time is different for every particle/ reference frame]. It is the coordinate time of an observer whose reference frame travels up the ...
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1answer
152 views

Does a light cone only effect the time an object has lived?

I'm confused about light cones and I've driven a crazy scenario to try to represent it. Let's say I can move through my past light cone to the exact time of my birth. If I kept on moving back could ...
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2answers
213 views

Does our current notion of velocity/acceleration (based on calculus) require absolute time?

When people explain special relativity, they say that a velocity in one frame leads to time dilation in that frame relative to a stationary frame. When we say something like ...
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4answers
770 views

Why Sun light can reach us if Time is dilating?

I understand that if something is moving with constant speed in respect to an observer, the time of the moving one runs slower, so the more your speed is, the more your time ticks slower. Which ...
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2answers
668 views

Will Earth clock be slower than aeroplane clock when viewed from another planet?

I know that a clock placed on an aeroplane will have slowed with respect to a clock placed on earth because the more our velocities are, compared to the speed of light, the more the time slows down. ...
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5answers
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Why doesn't mass of bob affect time period?

The gravitation formula says $$F = \frac{G m_1 m_2}{r^2} \, ,$$ so if the mass of a bob increases then the torque on it should also increase because the force increased. So, it should go faster and ...
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320 views

Imaginary time and string theory

Is imaginary time an extra dimension? In other words, are time and imaginary time considered two separate dimensions? If so, does imaginary time appear (as a separate dimension) in string theory (thus ...
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3answers
226 views

Time slowing down problem

When someone moves, time slows down for him. Let, a man standing still and another moving very very very fast, this happens for an hour (as measured by the standing man). Time has moved slower for the ...
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2answers
93 views

Is a non-accelerating object far from a gravity source moving at the speed of light through time?

I'm trying to understand the Minkowski spacetime better. If an object is not undergoing acceleration, and is far from any large mass, does it travel maximally "fast" through time? Can we calculate a ...
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1answer
72 views

How have the duration of the martian day changed in the past?

There is a panspermia theory which claims that life might have begun on Mars and I currently read a post that the human circadian rhythm is closer to the martian day length (about 25h) than the day ...
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2answers
238 views

What makes us move in time? [duplicate]

Time is considered to be a dimension, and we are moving at certain rate in one direction in time. What force makes us move in time? I mean it must be ether time moving or us moving in time so there ...
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4answers
607 views

Relation between Force, Time, and Energy

Is energy involved independent of force applied over time? In other words, if I wish to apply a force for much more time would I require more energy?
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1answer
139 views

Does anything apart from gravity and relative velocity affect time?

I have been learning about time and the different dilation effects of gravity and relative velocity. I was wondering, are there any other factors that can affect time?
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1answer
132 views

Age-ing due to Time Dilation

Will a person on top of hill will age faster than one at sea level due to Time Dilation?
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What is “first order“ and “second order” in time?

What is the meaning of the text quoted below? In the physical world, if a system is described by an equation that is first order in time, the system is general dissipative (has energy loss). ...
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1answer
124 views

Looking backwards in time at yourself

If a person on Earth today is looking at a star, say, 10 billion light years away, is it possible that some of the atoms he is looking at will eventually go on to make him?
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1answer
2k views

What is the difference between UT0, UT1 and GMT time?

Every reference I find says that they are "essentially" the same, which we all know really means that they are not the same, but different only by a some small amount that someone else other than me ...
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2answers
290 views

Is there a “present state” of distant stars if simultaneity is relative?

Special relativity theory says simultaneity is relative, meaning that different observers will not agree on what happened first and what second. Does it then make sense to say that looking at distant ...
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1answer
221 views

How does the winter solstice relate to the “longest night”

The winter solstice just gone was on the 22nd at 11:12 UTC. Does that mean the longest night was the night before or the one after? Or more generally, given the time of the winter solstice of any ...
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1answer
115 views

Difference between $dM/dt = 0$ and $\partial M/\partial t=0$ [duplicate]

$\frac{dM}{dt} = 0$ represents a constant of motion $M.$ Why not $\frac{\partial M}{\partial t}$ represent a constant of motion $M$?
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2answers
50 views

What is time measured against? [duplicate]

Today I was observing a clock and its movement, every second is an exact second on every clock. I was making a comparison between a second and a meter. I know in France there is a metal stick one ...
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2answers
102 views

Oscillation of Atom

What exactly does it mean when one says 'one atom of Caesium 137 oscillates 9,192,631,770 times'? I do understand the general thing about oscillation but what exactly is the oscillation of atom, what ...
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2answers
82 views

Time Dilation: One observer at rest, two observers in motion

I am currently taking a course in Modern Physics mainly focused on Special Relativity and came up with the following problem: Let $O_1$ be an observer at rest. A second observer $O_2$ is moving to ...
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1answer
171 views

Are we comoving observers of space expansion?

In cosmology: A comoving observer is the only observer that will perceive the universe, including the cosmic microwave background radiation, to be isotropic. (Wikipedia) According to this ...
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2answers
696 views

If a photon is exists in 'timeless' state, how can objects around it move? [duplicate]

My understanding is that light does not experience time. In attempting to understand what the universe would be like from the perspective of a photon, the answer I get is that the universe would be ...
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3answers
106 views

Is the world we are living in discretized? [duplicate]

I do not know how to use professional words to ask my question, so I will try to use a layman language. Please bear with me for a moment. A ROUGH GUESS The world our eyes are seeing every moment is ...
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1answer
53 views

If an area remains at temperature 0 Kelvin would the area be frozen in time?

If an area is at 0 kelvin, I am guessing that there is no motion. Without motion in an area, will it not look as if time has stopped?
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5answers
436 views

A question about motion and time dilation

I was thinking that if you are in empty space with another person (with no other objects around), and from a distance you see that the other person is approaching you a constant speed, you wouldn't ...
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3answers
306 views

Is there a point in universe that is observable at present?

We know that we can see distant galaxies only billions years before now. We can observe the nearest stars just several years before the present. Something on the Moon can be observed only some seconds ...
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2answers
103 views

When do natural leap years occur, on years based on the northern winter solstice?

I'm designing a new calendar and I want the first day of the year to be the first day after the longest night of year in the northern hemisphere. Under this plan, "natural" leap years, where the first ...
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1answer
108 views

Time passing near a black hole

Given distance $d$ from a normal black hole with mass $m$, how much seconds will pass at that distance while in infinite distance from the black hole $t$ seconds has passed?