Time is defined operationally to be that which is measured by clocks. The SI unit of time is the second, which is defined to be

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By what factor would you have to slow down time for water to feel like glass?

I have been told that though glass seems like a solid, it is somehow, in theory, a liquid -- but is just somehow a liquid that is so thick that it appears to be solid. (Of course --- if this premise ...
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1answer
160 views

How are the higher derivatives (jerk, jounce) of position with respect to time used in physics?

I don't see them much in any physics lesson or course, but that's probably because I'm not into physics as much. I can understand why velocity and acceleration are useful, but why would someone want ...
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1answer
45 views

Is it possible to travel forward and backward along with time? [closed]

Is it possible to travel along through time if we found a thing that is more speeder than light?
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23 views

What's the difference between cosmic time and conformal time? [duplicate]

When they say that the age of the Universe is about 13.7 billion years, they are giving the age in cosmic time, is that right?. There's this other thing called conformal time which I don't understand. ...
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2answers
89 views

Meaning of Proper time

Sorry for a bit of a basic question, but want to clarify things in my head. Is proper time quantified by the amount of physical process that an object, or physical system undergoes, for example the ...
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1answer
46 views

How can bubble collision happen if there is no space and time outside the universe?

The question is almost self-explanatory. What I am trying to say is that if there are no space-time outside our universe, how does collisions even happen. I am having a hard time explaining this ...
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1answer
55 views

Is gravitation time dilation simply c/v?

Recently, I've been very interested in forms of time dilation. I'm relatively new to relativity, so I apologize for any stupid mistake I may make. I was messing with the equation for gravitational ...
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0answers
33 views

How power spectral density in time domain can be understood?

I got some data which basically gives me the variation on the time of a PSD measured across specific frequency bands ranges, for instance [10Hz-30Hz]. However I have not found any good explanation ...
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2answers
54 views

What is the least count of the timer clocks used in RADAR?

I was checking out some videos in YouTube regarding the working principle of RADAR. To quote some HOW IT WORKS: World War II Radar (720p), part 1, How does RADAR work? | James May Q&A | Head ...
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1answer
65 views

Time dilation and space time [closed]

I know a little about space time, and I know that space time is adding the time component into the three- dimensional world and creating an abstract universe. But my question is that why time is ...
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0answers
49 views

What perpetuates change? [duplicate]

People say that our notion of "time" comes from entropy which in turn is just a large scale effect of the laws of physics, but what is it that perpetuates the laws of physics from one state into the ...
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0answers
57 views

If time somehow went backwards would this violate one of the laws of thermodynamics?

If time somehow went backwards and all the physical events that had occurred in a sequence , would some of the events occurring 'backwards' or in the reverse order violate the principle of entropy or ...
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1answer
47 views

Standardising shadow length on sundials

The sundial is fundamentally flawed in that the length of each hourly shadow changes with the seasons. If the base of the sundial was engineered to move cyclically on an anual basis however, the ...
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2answers
49 views

Can I sum-up time?

If a kinetic process takes 1 second to complete(reach a point), and that process is repeated $n$ number of times, is this formula correct $t_t$=$n\times 1$ = total time in seconds? It's similar to a ...
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1answer
43 views

Time dilation: reference frame [closed]

So I'm calculating how long it will take for half of some muons to decay for in a stationary observers frame of reference. They have a half life of 2.2 * 10^-6 and are moving at a speed of .98c ...
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3answers
24 views

How can we be sure that a new frequency standard is better than the old one?

Lets assume for this question that at one point in scientific history everyone was running along well with their cesium frequency standards, and someone has a brilliant idea and builds an active ...
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1answer
65 views

Understand the relation of time and the space dimensions of spacetime?

I assume the relation of the three spacial dimensions and the time dimension is handled purely in the mathematical domain, usually. But is there any intuitive description of this relationship, how ...
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2answers
535 views

Why does time exist? [closed]

So I have been thinking about some subjects and one of it involves time. And I tried writing a story/question on here to summarize the bigger picture but it's not going to happen it's too complicated ...
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1answer
63 views

How much is time slowed down inside a planet or star?

An answer to What would be the rate of acceleration from gravity in a hollow sphere? states "that according to General Relativity time passes more slowly inside a hollow massive sphere than it does ...
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1answer
56 views

Has the effect of magnetic fields on time ever been examined experimentally?

Relativity of time can be examined with satellites as gravitational or acceleration. Is there any similar experiment with intense magnetic fields?
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3answers
96 views

Does Time change over temperature? [duplicate]

I am not a physicist, I am just an engineer. But I dared to ask whether the temperature changes the perception of time. Let's consider a particle that "stops" at absolute zero. I was thinking as a ...
2
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1answer
284 views

How come the concept of an instant of time is such a controversial topic with relativity, but with entanglement it's completely acceptable?

When talking about relativity most people say that a universal instant of time doesn't exist, but when talking about entanglement most will say that the particles are both measured instantaneously. ...
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1answer
36 views

Observing from a black hole proximity

Suppose that you could get close enough to a black hole that time slowed down significantly for you, and you looked at a giant clock back on earth through a telescope. Would you see the earth clock go ...
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2answers
79 views

Can photons decay without interaction?

Can photons decay like other particles without interacting with other particles or fields, i.e. by just "being"? In case the answer is "no" - does this have anything to do with them travelling at c, ...
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1answer
124 views

Understanding gravitational time dilation / Schwarzschild metric

I've had a look at the answers to these sorts of questions already, but feel like I'm still missing something. Starting with this question, and this one and even this one here. I'm looking at this ...
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0answers
15 views

Is there a “framerate” for the universe? [duplicate]

I've been wondering this for quite some time. I just can't wrap my head around the idea of truly continuous time. If time is truly infinitely divisible, then how can any object in the universe move? ...
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1answer
156 views

Does time freeze at Absolute Zero? [closed]

Time has many definitions per se, but the basic idea being it's "the measurement of change" so as we know, all matter looses it's ability of changing with the loss of kinetic energy. and the where it ...
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3answers
105 views

Force and Acceleration, is there a delay?

Suppose we have a mass $m$. We can talk about two of its parameters : The net force applied on it $f(t)$ and its net acceleration $a(t)$. I want to know whether there is any delay between $f(t)$ and ...
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1answer
38 views

Symmetric Time Dilation in Uniform Relative Motion

I feel (and hope) this is an easily answerable question among physicists versed in GR. I promise that I searched for other answers on the forum. Here goes: Observer 1 starts at X distance from ...
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0answers
25 views

The speed of light sets a lower limit to the rate at which a reference frame can pass through time. Is there anything that sets an upper limit? [duplicate]

Is there any "slowest" velocity that sets a cap on how fast a reference frame passes through time, or can you pass through time infinitely fast given a "slow" enough velocity?
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4answers
112 views

What's the differences between time in Physics and time in everyday use?

OK. This question might sound as not a good question, but the word 'time' is so confusing to me. I mean thermodynamics says time is the product of entropy. Relativity says time is relative. Quantum ...
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3answers
1k views

Is there a constant/baseline for how fast time passes?

Say we have an object completely unaffected by the effects of gravity/velocity. Is there a way to measure the passing of time for this object? Since time moves slightly slower for us on or near ...
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2answers
103 views

Speed of light and perception

So I'm reading a book called "The Elegant Universe" and here is a part of it Imagine two countries that have been at war are sitting down to sign a treaty ending hostilities while traveling aboard a ...
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2answers
113 views

Is time dilation based on the formula for period of a pendulum?

The theory Albert Einstein put forward about special relativity mentions a possibility for time dilation, in which he states gravity has a considerable effect on time. And in high school physics we ...
2
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1answer
68 views

Does time really differs drastically?

As I heard/read time moves slower and slower for me as I speed up, but does it change drastically? Our current formulas say, If I go at a speed very close to light's, time almost stops. I've seen ...
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3answers
121 views

Time period related to acceleration due to gravity

The period of a pendulum is given by $$ T = 2\pi \sqrt{\frac{L}{g}}. $$ If we take a pendulum where there is no gravitational field, then $g=0$, therefore the period should become infinity. In such a ...
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1answer
126 views

Age of the universe [closed]

Does the fact that the edge of our observable Universe contains information from the beginning of the Universe give us an ability to determine its age? The edge of our observable universe surely has ...
89
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4answers
12k views

Why do electrons, according to my textbook, exist forever?

Does that mean that electrons are infinitely stable? The neutrinos of the three leptons are also listed as having a mean lifespan of infinity.
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2answers
414 views

Is the second defined arbitrarily? [duplicate]

According to the definition a second is defined as the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of ...
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1answer
94 views

Could time be considered a force

I think I understand the basic concept of spacetime, at least some of it. And when people talk about spacetime they don't call gravity a force, but rather the result of mass interacting with it. And ...
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2answers
134 views

Naked Time ( Is there such a thing ?) [closed]

I have lately been concerned with time and whether or not it is an illusion. For argument's sake let's assume it is. Then time should stand on its own. Can anyone describe, (or point me to a paper ...
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2answers
180 views

Does the universe have a different age to different observers?

Although I understand that the universe is approximately 12 billion light years wide, and that may mean that it took the light photons 12 billion years at 186,000 miles per second to reach the ...
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2answers
63 views

Movement of accelerating points with maximum speed (i.e. running away from tiger) [closed]

I'm walking through a forest and suddenly I see a tiger. And now I have a problem. I want to know how much time I have left but I don't know how to calculate it. Or more formally: Let's ...
9
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3answers
816 views

How do we know that the cesium-beam frequency used in atomic clocks is always the same?

Atomic clocks use cesium-beam frequency to determine the length of a second. This has shown that the period of orbit of the earth is decreasing. But what experiment showed that cesium-beam's period ...
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1answer
234 views

Is time an illusion? [closed]

IS time an illusion? I have tried thought experiment after TE and quite frankly I can't find any instance where time is defined wholly on its own. It is always a measurement of the interim between to ...
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2answers
177 views

are clocks always wrong? [closed]

So I was sitting thinking earlier and I remembered an experiment that I heard a couple days back about how scientists put a stop watch on a jet and it had a different time then one on earth because ...
4
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1answer
72 views

Can you use pulsar observations to determine absolute time? How long can you go without anything else?

In this old answer of Steve Allen's, he quotes this nice passage Imagine for a moment what would happen if, just as a practical joke, someone found a way to stop all atomic clocks, just for a ...
0
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1answer
69 views

Is our locally measured time actually conformal time?

The FRW metric at the origin $r=0$, with $c=1$, is given by: $$ds^2=-dt^2+a(t)^2dr^2$$ Now one can change variables so that near the origin the FRW metric is approximated by the Minkowski metric ...
0
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1answer
59 views

Time relativity / paradox [duplicate]

After watching the movie Interstellar, the theory of time relativity / paradox really mind-boggles me. If it is true that gravity controls everything even to the extent of time, then it might as well ...
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2answers
74 views

Theory of relativity. Relative to what? [duplicate]

If I properly understand relativity, time ticks faster for an object sitting still than for an object passing by. So, in a universe with only two objects which have the same "age", object A is ...