Time is defined operationally to be that which is measured by clocks. The SI unit of time is the second, which is defined to be

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1answer
367 views

Is time the property of an object?

I don't know if the title makes much sense, but hopefully it will become clear with the text. Temperature is not a property of a point in the three dimensions, but actually of the object occupying ...
0
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2answers
470 views

Why does time exist? [closed]

So I have been thinking about some subjects and one of it involves time. And I tried writing a story/question on here to summarize the bigger picture but it's not going to happen it's too complicated ...
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9answers
1k views

Did relativity make Newtonian mechanics obsolete?

Did Einstein completely prove Newton wrong? If so, why we apply Newtonian mechanics even today? Because Newton said that time is absolute and Einstein suggested it relative? So, if fundamentals are ...
1
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1answer
60 views

How much is time slowed down inside a planet or star?

An answer to What would be the rate of acceleration from gravity in a hollow sphere? states "that according to General Relativity time passes more slowly inside a hollow massive sphere than it does ...
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1answer
55 views

Has the effect of magnetic fields on time ever been examined experimentally?

Relativity of time can be examined with satellites as gravitational or acceleration. Is there any similar experiment with intense magnetic fields?
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3answers
93 views

Does Time change over temperature? [duplicate]

I am not a physicist, I am just an engineer. But I dared to ask whether the temperature changes the perception of time. Let's consider a particle that "stops" at absolute zero. I was thinking as a ...
2
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1answer
135 views

Can two distinct events occur at precisely the same moment in time?

I am writing a simulation and am having difficulty resolving the order in which two distinct forces occur. The simulation will give different results if the forces are applied to the state in ...
2
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1answer
265 views

How come the concept of an instant of time is such a controversial topic with relativity, but with entanglement it's completely acceptable?

When talking about relativity most people say that a universal instant of time doesn't exist, but when talking about entanglement most will say that the particles are both measured instantaneously. ...
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1answer
94 views

Does time freeze at Absolute Zero? [closed]

Time has many definitions per se, but the basic idea being it's "the measurement of change" so as we know, all matter looses it's ability of changing with the loss of kinetic energy. and the where it ...
0
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1answer
32 views

Observing from a black hole proximity

Suppose that you could get close enough to a black hole that time slowed down significantly for you, and you looked at a giant clock back on earth through a telescope. Would you see the earth clock go ...
0
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1answer
103 views

Understanding gravitational time dilation / Schwarzschild metric

I've had a look at the answers to these sorts of questions already, but feel like I'm still missing something. Starting with this question, and this one and even this one here. I'm looking at this ...
2
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2answers
71 views

Can photons decay without interaction?

Can photons decay like other particles without interacting with other particles or fields, i.e. by just "being"? In case the answer is "no" - does this have anything to do with them travelling at c, ...
0
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0answers
15 views

Is there a “framerate” for the universe? [duplicate]

I've been wondering this for quite some time. I just can't wrap my head around the idea of truly continuous time. If time is truly infinitely divisible, then how can any object in the universe move? ...
3
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3answers
101 views

Force and Acceleration, is there a delay?

Suppose we have a mass $m$. We can talk about two of its parameters : The net force applied on it $f(t)$ and its net acceleration $a(t)$. I want to know whether there is any delay between $f(t)$ and ...
4
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5answers
156 views

How can we justify dropping the absolute time hypothesis?

In some approaches to Special Relativity the theory is motivated talking about the Michelson-Morley experiment and how this relates to the postulate that the speed of light is the same in every ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Symmetric Time Dilation in Uniform Relative Motion

I feel (and hope) this is an easily answerable question among physicists versed in GR. I promise that I searched for other answers on the forum. Here goes: Observer 1 starts at X distance from ...
1
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0answers
25 views

The speed of light sets a lower limit to the rate at which a reference frame can pass through time. Is there anything that sets an upper limit? [duplicate]

Is there any "slowest" velocity that sets a cap on how fast a reference frame passes through time, or can you pass through time infinitely fast given a "slow" enough velocity?
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4answers
107 views

What's the differences between time in Physics and time in everyday use?

OK. This question might sound as not a good question, but the word 'time' is so confusing to me. I mean thermodynamics says time is the product of entropy. Relativity says time is relative. Quantum ...
9
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3answers
1k views

Is there a constant/baseline for how fast time passes?

Say we have an object completely unaffected by the effects of gravity/velocity. Is there a way to measure the passing of time for this object? Since time moves slightly slower for us on or near ...
1
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2answers
92 views

Speed of light and perception

So I'm reading a book called "The Elegant Universe" and here is a part of it Imagine two countries that have been at war are sitting down to sign a treaty ending hostilities while traveling aboard a ...
2
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2answers
669 views

Time Reversal in a Black Hole

I had a lively discussion with a person about black holes recently, and was making the point about gravitational acceleration in GR being paralleled by speed in SR. One thing that I know people talk ...
88
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4answers
12k views

Why do electrons, according to my textbook, exist forever?

Does that mean that electrons are infinitely stable? The neutrinos of the three leptons are also listed as having a mean lifespan of infinity.
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2answers
90 views

Is time dilation based on the formula for period of a pendulum?

The theory Albert Einstein put forward about special relativity mentions a possibility for time dilation, in which he states gravity has a considerable effect on time. And in high school physics we ...
2
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5answers
363 views

What is the exact mechanism by which time dilates?

What is the exact mechanism by which time dilates for a fast moving object? Can the time dilation be explained by any theory other than relativity?
1
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1answer
124 views

Age of the universe [closed]

Does the fact that the edge of our observable Universe contains information from the beginning of the Universe give us an ability to determine its age? The edge of our observable universe surely has ...
2
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1answer
68 views

Does time really differs drastically?

As I heard/read time moves slower and slower for me as I speed up, but does it change drastically? Our current formulas say, If I go at a speed very close to light's, time almost stops. I've seen ...
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3answers
91 views

Time period related to acceleration due to gravity

The period of a pendulum is given by $$ T = 2\pi \sqrt{\frac{L}{g}}. $$ If we take a pendulum where there is no gravitational field, then $g=0$, therefore the period should become infinity. In such a ...
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2answers
380 views

Is the second defined arbitrarily? [duplicate]

According to the definition a second is defined as the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of ...
0
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2answers
160 views

Does the universe have a different age to different observers?

Although I understand that the universe is approximately 12 billion light years wide, and that may mean that it took the light photons 12 billion years at 186,000 miles per second to reach the ...
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1answer
77 views

Could time be considered a force

I think I understand the basic concept of spacetime, at least some of it. And when people talk about spacetime they don't call gravity a force, but rather the result of mass interacting with it. And ...
0
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2answers
57 views

Movement of accelerating points with maximum speed (i.e. running away from tiger) [closed]

I'm walking through a forest and suddenly I see a tiger. And now I have a problem. I want to know how much time I have left but I don't know how to calculate it. Or more formally: Let's ...
9
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3answers
798 views

How do we know that the cesium-beam frequency used in atomic clocks is always the same?

Atomic clocks use cesium-beam frequency to determine the length of a second. This has shown that the period of orbit of the earth is decreasing. But what experiment showed that cesium-beam's period ...
0
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2answers
133 views

Naked Time ( Is there such a thing ?) [closed]

I have lately been concerned with time and whether or not it is an illusion. For argument's sake let's assume it is. Then time should stand on its own. Can anyone describe, (or point me to a paper ...
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votes
1answer
161 views

Is time an illusion? [closed]

IS time an illusion? I have tried thought experiment after TE and quite frankly I can't find any instance where time is defined wholly on its own. It is always a measurement of the interim between to ...
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0answers
26 views

Calculating Time to reach a given velocity knowing force of thrust [closed]

so I am working on a physics problem for a class I am taking. The problem is as follows: -A rocket, weighing $4.36\times10^4 N$ has an engine that provides an upward force of $8.90*10^5 N$. It reaches ...
3
votes
2answers
370 views

Why time is considered a dimension?

Why is time considered to be a dimension? And the other 7 (except the 3 dimensions of space, and the dimension of time) dimensions that string theory suggests, why can't they be realized?
4
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1answer
68 views

Can you use pulsar observations to determine absolute time? How long can you go without anything else?

In this old answer of Steve Allen's, he quotes this nice passage Imagine for a moment what would happen if, just as a practical joke, someone found a way to stop all atomic clocks, just for a ...
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2answers
174 views

are clocks always wrong? [closed]

So I was sitting thinking earlier and I remembered an experiment that I heard a couple days back about how scientists put a stop watch on a jet and it had a different time then one on earth because ...
11
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3answers
506 views

If time standard clocks and any memories about the time standard are destroyed, can we recover the time standard again?

Assume the time standard clocks and any memories about the time standard are destroyed. Can we recover the time standard again exactly? Recovering the time standard again means we can determine the ...
0
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1answer
61 views

Is our locally measured time actually conformal time?

The FRW metric at the origin $r=0$, with $c=1$, is given by: $$ds^2=-dt^2+a(t)^2dr^2$$ Now one can change variables so that near the origin the FRW metric is approximated by the Minkowski metric ...
1
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1answer
103 views

What is the difference between a parameter, a variable, and an operator in QM?

On the question why time isn't an operator, people will usually say that time is a parameter in QM (Time as a Hermitian operator in QM?) and not a variable. Can someone please distinguish between a ...
0
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1answer
54 views

Time relativity / paradox [duplicate]

After watching the movie Interstellar, the theory of time relativity / paradox really mind-boggles me. If it is true that gravity controls everything even to the extent of time, then it might as well ...
3
votes
1answer
153 views

Regarding the possibility of Closed Timelike Curves

I've been looking a lot at Closed Timelike Curves, and how if a theory allows for these curves it doesn't respect causality. I understand that about the curves themselves (Grandfather Paradox), but ...
8
votes
2answers
374 views

Time crystals : fake or revolution?

This article about "crystals of time" just appeared on the PRL website. Viewpoint: Crystals of Time (http://physics.aps.org/articles/v5/116) The authors (including famous Frank Wilczek) claim that ...
0
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2answers
56 views

Eulerian mass conservation on a stream line to Lagrangian mass conservation

if the density of a fluid particle is conserved on a streamline, $$\frac{d\rho}{dt}=0.$$ Why does this mean $$\frac{\partial \rho}{\partial t}+(\mathbf{v}\cdot\nabla)\rho=0$$ is true everywhere? Why ...
1
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2answers
71 views

Theory of relativity. Relative to what? [duplicate]

If I properly understand relativity, time ticks faster for an object sitting still than for an object passing by. So, in a universe with only two objects which have the same "age", object A is ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Doesn't the Big Bang negate the law of conservation of matter? [duplicate]

I was watching Hawking (2004 film) and in the movie, Hawking has a sudden insight that all the matter and energy observed in the known universe may, in fact, have sprung out from nothing (singularity) ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

Would Special Relativity Predict Time Dilation of a Geostationary Satellite Compared to an Observer on Earth?

Consider a geostationary satellite at some arbitrary distance above the Earth's equator and consider a person directly below it, standing on the Earth's equator. Both satellite and person exist on the ...
0
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2answers
1k views

Does travelling light help us see past versions of an object?

I saw a passage in my son's homework book, constructing a scenario in which a person standing on a planet 65 million light years away from Earth, with an extremely powerful telescope pointed at Earth, ...
7
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4answers
908 views

Special Relativistic Time Dilation — A computer in a very fast centrifuge

Ok, I've stumbled onto what I think is a bit of a paradox. First off, say you had some computer in a very fast(near light speed) centrifuge. You provide power to this computer via a metal plate on ...