10
votes
1answer
304 views

What exactly does the Hamiltonian operator tell us?

I'm confused about how energy and time are linked. On the one hand, the Hamiltonian seems to describe the time evolution of the system because in the time dependent Schrodinger equation, $$ \hat H ...
7
votes
4answers
252 views

Does Heisenberg equation of motion imply the Schrodinger equation for evolution operator?

Let us choose to postulate (e.g. considering the analogy of the Hamiltonian being a generator of time evolution in classical mechanics) $$ i\hbar \frac{d\hat{U}}{dt}=\hat{H}\hat{U}\tag{1} $$ where ...
0
votes
3answers
104 views

Solving the Schrödinger equation where the initial wave function is an energy eigenfunction

I was watching Allan Adams' lecture on energy eigenfunctions, and there's one part (around 43 minutes into the lecture) that confuses me. Suppose we have the initial wave function $\Psi (x,0)$ such ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

Time evolution of states - Is total energy constant or not?

Suppose the state of the particle is given as follows: $$ |\psi_{(t)}\rangle = \frac{1}{\sqrt2} \left( e^{-\frac{i\omega t}{2}} |0\rangle + e^{-\frac{3i\omega t}{2}} |1\rangle \right) $$ Where the ...
10
votes
2answers
252 views

The formal solution of the Schrodinger equation

Let's have Schrodinger equation (or some equation in Schrodinger form) $$ \tag 1 i \partial_{0} \Psi ~=~ \hat{H} \Psi . $$ One likes to write that it has formal solution $$ \tag 2 \Psi (t) ~=~ ...
7
votes
1answer
400 views

Is it possible to derive Schrodinger equation in this way?

Let's have wave-function $\lvert \psi \rangle$. The full probability is equal to one: $$\langle \Psi\lvert\Psi \rangle = 1.\tag{1}$$ We need to introduce time evolution of $\Psi $; we know it in ...
2
votes
4answers
198 views

Why do we consider the evolution (usually in time) of a wave function?

Why do we consider evolution of a wave function and why is the evolution parameter taken as time, in QM. If we look at a simple wave function $\psi(x,t) = e^{kx - \omega t}$, $x$ is a point in ...