5
votes
2answers
352 views

Speed of light in general relativity

My question has a few parts concerning the speed of light in general relativity. Firstly, time changes in response to gravity and speed. Therefore, as gravity effects time in an area of space, should ...
18
votes
3answers
2k views

Would computers accelerated to high speeds compute “faster” from our point of view?

I woke up to this thought yesterday: Lets say Computers A and B have exactly the same specifications and at time T both are set to process an algorith that would normally take exactly 1 year and ...
0
votes
1answer
133 views

Why doesn't light travel instantly? [duplicate]

I've read that the faster you travel in space, the slower you travel in time. And when you reach the speed of light (which we won't be able to) time will stand still. So when light travels at the ...
0
votes
0answers
116 views

Twin Paradox Without Acceleration

So I've been doing a lot of reading about the twin paradox and have encountered several different explanations that strive to resolve it. First off let me start by saying general relativity is not an ...
0
votes
4answers
95 views

Would infinite time elapse relative to an outside observer if an object was completely at rest?

Here's my reasoning... time dilation due to velocity: t'=t√(1-v^2) v expressed as a % of the speed of light. If you are moving through distance at the speed of light, to an observer at rest relative ...
3
votes
2answers
202 views

How is time not a constant?

I am a visual person, so it's hard to imagine the information I keep getting, but shouldn't time be a constant? If you were traveling at the speed of light and your able to cover $299{,}792{,}458$ ...
2
votes
3answers
120 views

Expansion of the Universe regarding Time and lightspeed

According to our current understanding, the universe is expanding... it is often said that every galaxy is moving away from us (I'm assuming that isn't true for galaxies in our local group), and it's ...
6
votes
2answers
499 views

How can photons interact with anything?

I read photons do not age because they move at the speed of light. So when a photon interacts with my eyes, aren't they apart in space-time by the difference of the time in the frame of reference of ...
1
vote
1answer
121 views

Does the light speed change in media? [duplicate]

Does the light speed change? The Theory of Relativity says that the speed of light in vacuum is the same and unchangeable, while I read that the speed of light in glass is lower than in air, and that ...
0
votes
2answers
115 views

Time Delays in General Relativity

If gravity propagates at, or less than, the speed of light, and is therefore not instantaneous, does that introduce time delays to gravity? For example: suppose that we, the observer, sit within the ...
0
votes
2answers
153 views

Paradox Regarding Time Dilation at the Speed of Light

Consider the following scenario: On earth, I pulse a laser focused at a far away mirror such that the time it takes for the light to reflect off the mirror and arrive back at me is at least a few ...
1
vote
3answers
290 views

Why Sun light can reach us if Time is dilating?

I understand that if something is moving with constant speed in respect to an observer, the time of the moving one runs slower, so the more your speed is, the more your time ticks slower. Which ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

Clocks tick steadily, so why is there no photon time? [duplicate]

Consider a photon bouncing left and right between two mirrors in a photon clock. Seen from inside the clock, the photon bounces at a constant frequency. Time ticks regularly. No matter whether the ...
2
votes
2answers
155 views

does light experience time? [closed]

If we positioned a mirror 1 light year away from earth and shot a particle of light at the mirror so that it would reflect and come back to earth, how long would it take for us to receive that ...
3
votes
1answer
188 views

Time dilation and the speed of light in the twin paradox

Suppose we look at the twin paradox where the twin traveling at high speed relative to an observer on earth has a clock which counts time by sending photons of light across a distance within the ...
3
votes
8answers
6k views

How does velocity cause time dilation?

I've been trying to learn about the speed of light and time dilation, but I'm at an impasse. The presented facts say that if I travel around the solar system at 50% the speed of light and then come ...
3
votes
2answers
978 views

If I travel close to the speed of light and come back, why is everyone else dead, and not me? [duplicate]

Consider the following scenario: I get in a spaceship, and travel really close to the speed of light for a while, and then come back. A lot of time has passed on the Earth, but since I was traveling ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

What happens with time at the speed of light? [duplicate]

Say that by some means you could become massless, and therefore travel at the speed of light. I understand that the closer you get to the speed of light, the slower time appears to the person ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Could it be a limit in our measuring the speed of photon, instead of photon having a speed?

Are we (not) limited by our own speed through time (1 sec / sec) to measure highest possible speeds(c)? I fire a laser which hits a mirror and comes back and I precisely measure the time, and knowing ...
-2
votes
1answer
165 views

Could time be changing without us knowing? [closed]

I've been wondering about relativity for a while now. We seem to measure time by using the speed of light. Light can be slowed down or stopped We assume light doesn't change in a vacuum - yet, how ...
1
vote
1answer
259 views

If time stops for an object, does that object feel gravity?

As far as I understand The GTR, it is said that Mass bends space-time which causes gravity. So every Mass in this universe is flowing through space-time example earth is moving along with space-time ...
-1
votes
1answer
70 views

Is the universe we know just shaped due to time? [closed]

Call me a daydreamer, but I could not stop myself for asking this question. I was idle when something ticked me and struck my head. I was thinking about universe, speed of light, and how time works. ...
4
votes
5answers
672 views

Does the expansion of the universe soon after the Big Bang affect the amount of time that light takes to reach us?

If faster than light travel is impossible, how is it that light emitted from matter so close together in the time soon after the Big Bang is only now just reaching us? I would assume that there would ...
2
votes
1answer
308 views

Life of a photon [duplicate]

I am a student of class 12th and as far as i know when anything reaches about 99.99% of the speed of light it starts traveling in time or time for it slows down so that it don't breaks the speed ...
0
votes
1answer
233 views

What is the maximum time dilation between two objects, if one is standing still and the other is moving at $c$?

What is the maximum ratio in the rate of change in time in reference to object $A$ which is standing still and object $B$ which is moving at the speed of light?
4
votes
1answer
98 views

The Effects of Moving Matter Across Light-Year distances

If I were to stand at one end of a light-year long metal pole, and another person were to stand one light-year away at the other end, and then I were to push on my end of the pole. How long would it ...
16
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the length of 1 second in meters

If time is treated as a fourth dimension of spacetime, what is relation between length and time units? Or in other words, how can I convert time units to length units, for instance seconds to meters? ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

Why are objects at rest in motion through spacetime at the speed of light?

I read that an object at rest has such a stupendous amount of energy, $E=mc^2$ because it's effectively in motion through space-time at the speed of light and it's traveling through the time dimension ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

How to calculate time dilation in approaching speed of light

If a spaceship travels close to the speed of light (say, at 0.9c), how do I calculate the time as the spaceship pilot experience it? I thought the formula was $$t = \frac{t_0}{\sqrt{1-v^2/c^2}}$$ ...