the force on parts of a extended body in a non-uniform gravitational field due to residual of the gravitational attraction between the overall effect on the body and the expected effect on the point in question. Tidal forces are most notably in large moons orbiting near their primaries.

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45
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Why do some location on Earth have only one tidal maximum per day instead of two?

Most places in the ocean have two high tides and two low tides per "day" (~25 hours). But I remember reading that some locations only have one of each per day. This answer has some great explanations ...
129
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7answers
18k views

Does Earth really have two high-tide bulges on opposite sides?

The bit that makes sense – tidal forces My physics teacher explained that most tidal effect is caused by the Moon rotating around the Earth, and some also by the Sun. They said that in the Earth and ...
1
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0answers
47 views

Does a ball bearing cause bigger tides than the moon?

As per the answer to this question it is suggested the relative tidal pull of objects of equal angular area is equal to their relative density. Which lead me to the click-baity question: Does a ball ...
4
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1answer
63 views

For gravitational wave from twin stars, how was the tidal effect counted?

As the primary indirect evidence, the work on calculating the rotational slow down earned the 1993 Nobel prize. However, I cannot find any where mention how the work deal with the tidal effect. Are ...
-1
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2answers
79 views

What factors will make Earth re-rotate again if it stopped? [closed]

"What will happen if Earth stopped rotating?" have been answered multiple times with a lot of informative and interesting answers. Continuing this hypothetical question, I have another one in mind. ...
1
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2answers
239 views

Sun's tidal force on Earth

My question is regarding effect of Sun's gravity on earth. I want to know that if Sun's gravity can change Earth's landscape in long duration (i.e. billion of years) or not? Means if earth is dead ...
1
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2answers
57 views

What does “transfer” of angular momentum mean?

The Moon’s gravity produces tidal deformations or “bulges” in the Earth. Because of the Earth’s rotation, the line that goes through the bulges is not aligned with the line between the Earth and the ...
11
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5answers
1k views
0
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1answer
22 views

Stress-Energy Content

I think that the Einstein Field Equation relates the pseudo metric to the the distribution of matter-energy as represented by the stress-energy tensor. Are the stress entries in the stress-energy ...
0
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0answers
10 views

Tidal effect on pressure at sea floor

The tidal movement of water is explained by the gravitational changes due to the movement of earth, sun and moon. So simply thought, sea water climbs higher in areas where the sum gravitation is ...
0
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0answers
14 views

Tidal heating of body

I am trying to make a plausible, though not necessarily accurate model of tidal heating of a body moving close by a gravitational attractor, not necessarily in orbit and not considering the spin of ...
0
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1answer
75 views

Could a black hole maintain a stable orbit around the Earth?

Could a rotating Black Hole of mass $1.24\times 10^{10}$ kg maintain a stable orbit around Earth, without significantly altering the path of the Earth or Moon? In addition to this, would the presence ...
4
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1answer
66 views

How far has Earth moved from its birth orbit?

It says earth is almost as old as 1/3 of the universe's age which would mean 4.5 billion years . So how far has earth moved towards or away from the sun in these 4.5 billion years? Now perfect ...
3
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1answer
28 views

Which force transfers angular momentum in tidal locking?

The moon is in tidal lock with the earth, but a long time ago it was not. As the moon became tidally locked with the earth, its angular momentum changed and the delta went into it's orbit and possibly ...
14
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2answers
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Is the length of the day increasing?

In Frontiers of Astronomy, Fred Hoyle advanced an idea from E.E.R.Holmberg that although the Earth's day was originally much shorter than it is now, and has lengthened owing to tidal friction, that ...
1
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1answer
84 views

How does acceleration feel compared to gravitational pull?

I was debating a variation of this Phys.SE question with a friend. The original question is: "If you had your eyes closed, could you distinguish between standing still on earth and being in a ...
11
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4answers
357 views

Is the lay explanation of the equivalence principle wrong?

The common explanation/trope for the equivalence principle always has something to do with you being inside an elevator or spaceship, and your supposed inability to differentiate, say, gravity from a ...
0
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2answers
50 views

What effect does the Moon and Sun have on gravity? [duplicate]

I know that every object has a gravitational pull regardless of how far or how small it is. It's just that generally this force is negligible. Does the force produced by the sun and moon have any ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Spaghettification on an atomic scale?

Spaghettification occurs when an object approaches a singularity. As one comes close enough to the singularity, the gravity at the feet (if this is a human) is greater than that at the head, ...
2
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1answer
60 views

Is it possible to tidally lock a neutron star?

As I know, neutron stars are almost perfect sphere and no net moments, does it mean it is not possible to tidally lock it?
0
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0answers
39 views

How far inside a white dwarf Roche limit does the Earth have to be to start losing large chunks of rocks?

I have calculated that for a one solar mass white dwarf orbited by the Earth, the Roche limit is about 600,000 kilometers. I understand that any loose mass on the surface of the Earth would start ...
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1answer
160 views

Would a non-rotating Earth collapse on the Sun?

If the earth stopped rotating on its axis, would this influence its revolution motion? In particular, could it collapse on the sun? I ask this because on the one hand I thought the two degrees of ...
1
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1answer
43 views

Will the Earth ever show synchronous rotation? Why and when?

In this answer to the question "why does the moon have the same rotation and revolution periods?", we read: The mass and speed of rotation of the Earth influence the moon in that some of its ...
3
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2answers
42 views

Would this be a practical way to convert tidal energy into electrical energy?

Imagine a structure that is held above the water by pylons that are grounded on the ocean floor. In between these pylons is a pontoon that, when tides are rising holds and lifts a heavy weight. When ...
3
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3answers
328 views

Can an observer know what is the source of gravity?

There's an observer in a closed room without windows under an influence of gravity force. Can he determine what is the source of gravity - whether it's a spinning motion, acceleration or huge mass ...
50
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8answers
14k views

Short of collision, can gravity itself kill you?

Imagine that you are falling into object with huge gravity (i.e. black hole) that does not have any atmosphere. The question is - before you hit the ground, can the gravity itself (which would be ...
4
votes
2answers
168 views

Orbit in the vacuum

As the space is a vacuum and there is no friction in space, Can we assume that, if we place an object in gravity in exactly the right distance from a planet with gravity and in the right acceleration, ...
0
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1answer
16 views

By which factors are tides and waves affected?

To my understanding, the tides and waves on Earth's oceans are caused by various factors such as the moon's gravity, the water cycle (rains, storms, evaporation), Earth's rotation, etc. Although the ...
3
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2answers
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How gravitation affects tides

I know that tide is caused by the gravitational pull of moon but what I don't know is how it affects water. I have actually these doubts. Why does gravity of the moon creates tides only in water? ...
2
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4answers
340 views

Will this rope break due to the tidal forces or not?

While I was thinking about how tidal forces can make objects float at the surface of a planet orbiting a massive object like a black hole, the fact that any material on the Earth isn't held together ...
4
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3answers
91 views

What influence has the distance of the moon on the height of the tides?

As the Moon recedes from the Earth, are the tides getting taller or shorter? If the Moon is, someday, twice as far from the Earth, how many high tides will be there be each day?
2
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1answer
53 views

Is the polarization of light changed by gravity?

The Gravitational_redshift shows, that the wavelength of light gets altered in a gravitational field. But what about polarization of light? I imagine that e.g. by tidal forces circular polarized light ...
3
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2answers
186 views

Gravitational waves, tides and the end of universe

Is tides proof of gravitational waves with low frequency? According to Wikipedia, In physics, gravitational waves are ripples in the curvature of space-time which propagate as waves, travelling ...
7
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3answers
3k views

How long was a day at the creation of Earth?

Since the earth is slowing its rotation, and as far as I know, each day is 1 second longer every about 1.5 years, how long was an earth day near the formation of earth (4.5 billion years ago)? I ...
1
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2answers
2k views

True or false: the Moon was touching the Earth 1.2 billion years ago

A creationist website makes this argument for the 6,000 year old earth. I'm embarrassed to say I don't know how to do the math to evaluate the claim myself. However, the time scales involved seems ...
11
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2answers
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Tidal Lock Radius in Habitable Zones

Much is made of finding exoplanets in habitable zones, locations with orbital semi-major axes permitting water in the liquid state. Habitability may be compromised if such bodies become tidally ...
2
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3answers
109 views

How big bang could produce later collisions

The Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxies are supposed to "collide" in 4 billion years (collide in the sense of overlapping space, but nothing is really supposed to contact anything else). Assuming: ...
2
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1answer
57 views

How much microgravity is there on ISS due to tidal forces? [closed]

I used the equation for the tidal force: $$ F = \frac{2GMd}{r^3} $$ where $M$ is the mass of the Earth ($5.972 \times 10^{24}$ kg), $d$ is half the length of ISS ($50$ m), $r$ distance from center ...
2
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2answers
1k views

How many hours will there be in a day 5,000,000,000 years from now?

It is known that the moon is moving away from Earth 2cm a year, and in doing so makes the days longer. I want to know how many hours will have one day, when our planet is near its end.
2
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1answer
58 views

Why do tidal forces not violate conservation of energy? [duplicate]

Europa is an example of a satellite which is heated by tidal forces. The orbit is constant, so how is energy conserved on Europa?
1
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1answer
63 views

Distortion of body in Schwarzschild black hole

Suppose I toss a cloud of matter into a Schwarzschild black hole; for the sake of argument, have it be timelike dust. As we know, the dust is "spaghettified" by tidal forces: simultaneously compressed ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Is there a point at which spaghettification is highest?

I've read anything getting close to a regular black hole would experience spaghettification but not when you get close to super-massive black hole. Is there a point of "peak spaghettification" where ...
1
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0answers
29 views

Atmospheric Tides effect on atmospheric pressure

Regarding the atmospheric tides effect on the pressure, this answer (and the referenced sources) seem to point that such effect is very small. However, this pressure prediction graph for my hometown ...
2
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1answer
69 views

If the Moon had a large piece blown out would it remain tidally locked?

I just saw this video on Sonic Adventure 2 trivia where it's mentioned that part of the Moon was blown up but in later games it's whole. It was explained away as the Moon simply rotating to show the ...
0
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0answers
62 views

Evidence of possible tidal effects close to a gravitational wave emitting system

Currently we are attempting to detect gravitational wave emissions using the LIGO gravitational wave detection system (and similiar systems), by attempting to detect very weak gravitational waves ...
1
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1answer
44 views

Can a natural satellite have a synchronous orbit?

I was thinking about space-elevators and large masses being put into geosynchronous orbit, when I considered the possibility of a natural satellite being in a synchronous orbit. I did a little digging ...
0
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2answers
54 views

Can tidal forces significantly alter the orbits of satellites?

I would assume that there are other larger, more significant, forces acting on artificial satellites, but can tidal forces drastically alter the orbit of a satellite over time? I was thinking this ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

Will the Earth's rotation someday be synchronized with its revolution around the Sun?

When will the earth act like the moon with regard to one side of the moon always facing the earth. Will the earth one day get locked in a rotational orbit that has one side of the planet facing the ...
42
votes
8answers
8k views

Are we slightly lighter during the day and slightly heavier at night, owing to the force of the Sun's gravity?

Using $g = \frac{Gm}{r^2}$, the force on a point mass located at 1 AU from the Sun ($m = 2 \cdot 10^{30} \text{ kg}$) is about ~0.006 N/kg. Does that mean that, e.g., a 70 kg person is ~42g lighter ...
19
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3answers
5k views

How quickly was the Earth rotating 250 million years ago?

The Earth is slowing at a rate of $4.7\times10^{-4}$ miles per second every 100 years due to tidal forces of the moon. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth%27s_rotation ...